Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Johansson, Inez
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Enskär, K., Johansson, I., Ljusegren, G. & Widäng, I. (2011). Lecturers' experiences of participation in an international exchange. Nurse Education Today, 31(6), 541-546
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lecturers' experiences of participation in an international exchange
2011 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 541-546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Globalization is a trend in higher education and is judged to be essential to quality; however, there is a lack of publications on the outcome of lecturers' exchange. The aim of this study was to describe lecturers' experiences of participating in an international exchange. Twenty-six lecturers who had taken part in an exchange were invited to participate through writing a narrative. Data was analyzed with a qualitative method, and five categories emerged: Preparation and timing, challenges in teaching, demanding but worthwhile, broadening perspective and expanding network. The overall result showed that participating lecturers judged their international exchange to be a positive experience that had resulted in personal as well as professional development. However, a successful exchange requires planning, support and an open mind from all involved lecturers and institutions.

Keywords
Lecturers' experience, International exchange, Nursing education, Sweden–Africa
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14159 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.018 (DOI)21056919 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-12-29 Created: 2010-12-29 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Green, B., Johansson, I., Rosser, M., Tengnah, C. & Segrott, J. (2008). Studying abroad: A multiple case study of nursing students' international experiences. Nurse Education Today, 28(8), 982-993
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying abroad: A multiple case study of nursing students' international experiences
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 982-993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the experiences of nursing students undertaking an international placement during their pre-registration education. The study took place in two schools – one in the United Kingdom, and one in Sweden. The move of nursing education into higher education enabled students to participate in international exchange programmes. Previous research demonstrates that students participating in such programmes may gain enhanced cultural awareness and experience personal and professional growth. The study comprised a multiple case study, utilising semi-structured individual and group interviews and documentary analysis. Eighteen students from the UK and 14 from Sweden participated. Participants described an increase in confidence, self-reliance and professional knowledge and skills resulting from their international placement. There was an awareness of how healthcare roles differ between countries and a change in attitudes to others from different backgrounds and cultures. The differences between the two cases were marginal. Whilst there was support from both home and host universities this varied between the international placement providers. The international placements were beneficial; however, there is a need for change in the preparation, support and monitoring of students, greater engagement with the partner institutions, and more effective mentoring of staff.

Keywords
International exchange; Nursing students; Case study
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6738 (URN)
Available from: 2008-11-07 Created: 2008-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Button, L., Green, B., Tengnah, C., Johansson, I. & Baker, C. (2005). The impact of international placements on nurses´personal and professional lives: literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 50(3), 315-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of international placements on nurses´personal and professional lives: literature review
Show others...
2005 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 315-324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. This paper presents a critical review of research literature on the impact of international placements on the lives and practice of nurses.

Background. Health care institutions are progressively more aware of the need to respond to diverse patient populations and cultivate leaders to enrich the nursing profession, both locally and globally. One response has been to establish international exchange programmes for nursing students to give them experience of different cultures and health care systems.

Methods. A search of the literature from 1980 to 2003 using electronic databases was undertaken using the databases CINAHL, ERIC, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, the BIDS Social Science Citation Index and Medline. The keywords used were 'international exchange experience', 'international studies', 'international education', 'international placement(s)', 'exchange programme(s)', combined with 'nurses/nursing', combined with 'evaluation', 'practice', 'education' and/or 'policy'. The papers retrieved used both qualitative and quantitative approaches and were scrutinized for recurring themes.

Findings. Nurses reported significant changes in their personal development, perspectives on nursing practice and critical appraisal of health care systems. They also indicated an increased appreciation and sensitivity towards cultural issues and cross-cultural care. Moreover, differences in placement programmes, such as duration, preparation and debriefing were found to have affected the reported overall international placement experience. However, the primary effects of international placements were identified as personal development and transcultural adaptation.

Conclusion. Students should be exposed to a variety of nursing experiences within the host country. This would give them a broad spectrum for comparisons between cultures, nursing practice and health care delivery in those cultures. Therefore, educational institutions are strongly encouraged to provide opportunities for students to participate in nursing care and education in another

Keywords
international placement, literature review, nursing, culture, practice, impact
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4797 (URN)
Available from: 2008-07-08 Created: 2008-07-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Bendz, M., Widäng, I., Johansson, I. & Paulsson, Å. (2004). Student nurses' views of a learning model: a multi-method research study. Nurse Education in Practice, 4(4), 279-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student nurses' views of a learning model: a multi-method research study
2004 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 279-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to describe students´ perceptions of various assignments within a specific learning model. In particular the study focuses on how the students perceived and reacted to the assessment processes used. A learning model was developed in which the learning of nursing theory and practice was integrated with the overall aim of motivating students to integrate their cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills.

A multi-methods design was applied using a questionnaire and qualitative interviews. Two hundred and eighty four students were asked to complete the questionnaire. Fifteen of the 252 students who returned the questionnaire were interviewed. The main findings were that the students constructed their own learning depending on how they understood the specific assignment and there was diversity and the students´ interpretation of f the assignments.

They focused on the assignments in accordance to the demands they expected to face as registered nurses and their interpretations on the demands differed between them.

The way the individual student understands the paradigm of nursing must therefore be challenged; what does the student intend to achieve and why. Dialogues in which students and teachers share their understandings of the meaning of various aspects of nursing must be emphasized in nursing education.

Keywords
Nursing education, learning strategies, assessment, student nurse.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4886 (URN)doi:10.1016 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-07-08 Created: 2008-07-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I. & Berterö, C. (2003). Getting no respect: Barriers to mammography for a group of Swedish women. Health Care for Women International, 24(1), 8-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Getting no respect: Barriers to mammography for a group of Swedish women
2003 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mammography screening is a highly sensitive and specific method to detect breast cancer at an early stage. If screening campaigns are to be cost effective, compliance is valuable. However, many women do not attend when called for mammography screening.

Our aim in this study is to understand and explain why women become nonattenders. A sample of 16 nonattending women, aged between 43 and 73 years, participated in this qualitative study, by interviews or written comments. The core category discovered in the data was "getting no respect." The informants did not feel respected from either the society or the health care system. Below this core category, two categories were identified: the mammography examination and affecting circumstances. The performance and its effects comprised the content of the category of mammography examination. The category affecting circimstances included knowledge about risk factors, prevention, and practical or emotional arguments.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4798 (URN)doi:10.1080/07399330390169990 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-07-08 Created: 2008-07-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I. & Berterö, C. (2003). Social support and self-esteem in patients afflicted with cancer in the reproductive organs, including breasts. Australian-Asian Journal of Cancer, 2(2), 116-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social support and self-esteem in patients afflicted with cancer in the reproductive organs, including breasts
2003 (English)In: Australian-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social support is generally considered as having positive effects on cancer patients´ health and well being by supporting the patient to manage the crisis. But, a cancer diagnosis and its treatment do often have negative effects on self-esteem and the cancer patients´ life-concepts. The relation between perceived social support and self-esteem among cancer patients were identified and explored in present study. Two hundred and sixteen respondents, living in the south of Sweden, completed the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The sample consisted of 116 females and 100 males, ranged in the age from 26-82. The majority of the sample was married, had children and grandchildren. The average duration of illness was 5 years. The average number of people in each network was 8.0, and relatives and friends were most frequently listed. The majority of the sample scored high self-esteem and statistical significance was shown in relation to age. No statistical significance was shown with respect to self-esteem and social support, but moderate correlations were found. Strongest correlations were found between emotional support and self-esteem. Increased knowledge about cancer patients´ long-term experiences is needed in order to perceive them as patients with a chronic disease.

National Category
Nursing Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4884 (URN)
Available from: 2008-07-08 Created: 2008-07-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I. & Berterö, C. (2002). Types and sources of social support among cancer patients: are there differences with respect to gender.. Australian-Asian Journal of Cancer, 2(1), 3-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Types and sources of social support among cancer patients: are there differences with respect to gender.
2002 (English)In: Australian-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The uncertainties and fears experienced by an individual diagnosed with cancer are likely to result in an enhanced need for social support. Social support is beneficial to cancer patients in adjusting to the stress of the disease, but those who have cancer may be especially likely to experience difficulties in obtaining adequate support. Types and sources of social support available to people afflicted with cancer related to reproductive organs and breast were assessed in this study, focusing on gender differences wit respect to social support. Two hundred and eighteen respondents completed the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire. Significant differences were found with respect to gender and being married, age, having grandchildren and being employed. Statistically significant differences were also found with respect to emotional support and frequency of contact with network members. Female scored higher emotional support, as well as higher total function support than males, even though the females were more likely to be single, divorced or widowed. This contests the statements about the marital relationship as the most powerful life support source and the significant factor for cancer survival. It seems that there might be other affecting factors that make the cancer patient perceive and experience social support, perhaps a gender factor.

Health care providers must take into consideration that there are differences in how human beings act and perceive things with respect to gender.

Keywords
cancer patients, gender, social support, sources of social support.
National Category
Nursing Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4885 (URN)
Available from: 2007-12-18 Created: 2007-12-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications