Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Larsson, Anna
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Larsson, A. (2011). Strategists in business society? (1ed.). In: Teresa García-Merino; Valle Santos-Álarez (Ed.), Managerial Cognition and Strategic Management: Rethinking internationalization strategies (pp. 3-24). New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategists in business society?
2011 (English)In: Managerial Cognition and Strategic Management: Rethinking internationalization strategies / [ed] Teresa García-Merino; Valle Santos-Álarez, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2011, 1, p. 3-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14968 (URN)978-1-61668-929-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-05-09 Created: 2011-05-09 Last updated: 2011-08-30Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A. & Melin, L. (2010). Exploring the separation of ownership and management: Changes in governance and owner managed firms. Paper presented at 6th EIASM workshop on Family Firms Management Research.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the separation of ownership and management: Changes in governance and owner managed firms
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The main concern in this paper is to explore the literature of governance regarding both the large corporation and the family business to further our understanding of the separation of ownership and management in family business in general and in the owner managed family firm in particular. Drawing on our review of these two separate approaches to governance in the literature we argue that by combining them we can further our understanding of governance changes in family firms. We conceptualize a governance change where an external CEO is introduced in the owner managed family firm as the untangling of ownership and management. This change takes place both in a complex context of the family controlled business and in an institutionalized context where practices of the large corporations influence the notions of general management and governance. We conclude that qualitative and interpretive approaches to the study of changes in governance would contribute to our understanding of these complex social processes that implies (re-)constructing the meaning and practice of ownership and management in family firms.

Keyword
separation ownership and management, owner/managed family firms
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13285 (URN)
Conference
6th EIASM workshop on Family Firms Management Research
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28
Larsson, A. (2009). As CEOs become strategists?: Interpretations of encounters with strategic management discourse. Paper presented at 6th International Critical Management Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>As CEOs become strategists?: Interpretations of encounters with strategic management discourse
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Keyword
strategic management discourse, strategists, methodology
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13282 (URN)
Conference
6th International Critical Management Conference
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28
Bjursell, C. & Larsson, A. (2009). Bridging Types and Frames in the Organizational (Inter)Act: Type Casting of Female Researchers in Academia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging Types and Frames in the Organizational (Inter)Act: Type Casting of Female Researchers in Academia
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we bridge the concepts type (Schutz) and frame (Goffman) to conceptualize misfits in the social intercourse of the academic everyday experiences. We see the combination of type and frame as a way to further elaborate the role concept. This was done by developing an interactional model that illustrates a combination of type and frame in relation to an organizational setting where the (inter)act takes place. The concept (inter)act is used to stress that although people may participate in the same act; this is not necessarily the same thing as role agreement during interaction. Rather, the lack of agreement is the starting point for this paper; we work with the empirical question “Why were we, and our fellow colleagues, treated as women when we were acting as researchers?”

The problem we address is how some people in an academic organization confused the idea of woman as a type with the female body, and what consequences this had for everyday social practices. This paper is based on an at-home ethnography (Alvesson, forthcoming), which in our version include both introspection and dialogue around emerging ideas and involves a strong component of re-interpretation.  We suggest that individuals may embrace or reject role-types, connected to a role-frame of expected behavior, in the organizational socialization process. Research as an activity is characterized by both masculine and feminine attributes, but in line with previous writings we see the research organization as gendered; the researcher-type is a man. We have called this type-role the wizard-man, a type that engage in intellectual activity. An alternative type-role is the mother-woman, whose role-frame is in line with key words such as body and caring. In the academic organization studied, there was a blurring between people as abstract (ideal) types and as individuals. In the organizational context, gendering by type casting seemed to be an important aspect of the socialization process. A negative consequence came when doctoral students were equaled to the mother-woman role, since these doctoral students were assumed to take on a role that was not in line with their professional development.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-10291 (URN)
Available from: 2009-09-04 Created: 2009-09-04 Last updated: 2010-04-14
Larsson, A. & Anderson, H. (2009). Everyday Strategic Environments - On similarities among strategists in different industries. Paper presented at 20th Nordic Academy of Management Conference (NFF).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday Strategic Environments - On similarities among strategists in different industries
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 

In this paper we pursue the research question: “What is it like inside a strategist’s world?” which originally was suggested by Smircich & Stubbart (1985). We elaborate on strategic environments through the everyday practices as described by CEOs (Schutz, 1967, 1973) and suggest that strategic environments can be characterized as specific, generic and institutionalized. Our findings emanate from an interview study with six general managers (CEOs) of medium sized listed companies from different industries in Sweden. The individual CEOs elaborate on the context/environment not only in terms of industry; instead they all contextualize their companies differently in terms of a specific environment. Based in these findings we argue that the notion of strategic environments should be widened beyond discussions on the competitive situation. Although, we also find that both the competitive situation and the ownership situation are elaborated on by all CEOs. Thus both “environments” occupy extensive time in their everyday situation but they are described differently by the CEOs. How can we understand the similarities among the CEOs? Is the everyday life of a CEO similarly determined by others? In addition to the interpretive framework advocated by Smircich & Stubbart (1985) we suggest a framing of strategists as members of an objectified and institutionalized business society which is inspired by Berger & Luckmann (1966).

Keyword
strategists, strategic environments, biographically situated typical subjects
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13281 (URN)
Conference
20th Nordic Academy of Management Conference (NFF)
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28 Last updated: 2010-09-28
Larsson, A. & Bjursell, C. (2009). Reflexivity through Introspection and Dialogue: A methodology for re-searching the familiarity of lived academic reality. Paper presented at 4th Annual International Ethnography Symposium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflexivity through Introspection and Dialogue: A methodology for re-searching the familiarity of lived academic reality
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Alvesson (2003a) encourages us to engage in close-up studies of the well known and familiar territories of our own organizations in academia, as academic organizations are less frequently made the subject/object of research. But as the title of his article suggests the endeavour to engage in close-up studies involves a struggle with the somewhat contradictory practices of closeness and closure. In this paper, inspired by the reflexive turn in social science in general, we suggest a methodological approach to deal with the struggles of closeness and closure but even more importantly to re-search (re-interpret, re-present and re-embody) the familiarity of lived everyday professional life. The methodology we advocate builds on a combination of inner and outer conversations conceptualised as introspection and dialogue. A trigger point and also a result of these conversations are experiences of bodily unease or the unpleasantly dirty experience of non consenting body over mind Inter-Acts in the academic context. Our specific concern is the process of learning how to become a researcher and we focus on what could be conceptualized as and the consequences of the people processing devices during socialization within a specific academic organization during the years leading up to dissertation but also more broadly into academia in general and the role of the researcher (van Maanen & Schein 1979, Berger & Luckmann 1966). We suggest that body over mind discourse in the academic workplace contributes to the disembodied researcher – whereas the result of the methodology suggested in this paper could contribute to explore its consequences and possibly encourage re-embodiment. Instead of treating body as a problematic feature of research we suggest that at-home ethnography involving strong auto-ethnographic dimensions can place bodily experiences of unease at the centre of attention, where the body serves as a tool informing the reflexive research process.

Keyword
methodology, ethnography, introspection, dialogue
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13284 (URN)
Conference
4th Annual International Ethnography Symposium
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28 Last updated: 2015-11-06
Larsson, A. (2008). Shifting Light onto the Background: Taking a more reflexive approach to interviews. Paper presented at Workshop on creative research methods, Lund.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shifting Light onto the Background: Taking a more reflexive approach to interviews
2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keyword
reflexivity, interviews, methodology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13287 (URN)
Conference
Workshop on creative research methods, Lund
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28
Bjursell, C. & Larsson, A. (2008). The yin and yang of organization: Applying Jung's terminology to take a closer look at management of shadows. In: : .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The yin and yang of organization: Applying Jung's terminology to take a closer look at management of shadows
2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

In management and organization research the positive, upward-seeking, producing side (yang) is often described as some kind of best practice that we can get inspired by but as an individual within an organization you also encounter another side that is passive, dark and negative (yin).

“The yang face of managing, the drama of MSF and the corresponding style of its leader, would seem more representative of how management is practiced today. [ ] The drama, not the daily routine, is what attracts and sells. But most managing is about the daily routine—about trying to establish and sustain excellence. In that respect, we need to pay more attention to the mysteries of yin. If there really are two faces of managing, then we have been neglecting one of them.” (Mintzberg 2001, page 312)

In this working paper we would like to explore the yin and yang of organization using Jung’s terminology as a metaphor for different aspects of organization. In a modern world where the yang is related to constructs of masculinity and the yin to constructs of femininity, how can Jungs terminology of the subconscious inhabited by shadows and Anima be included in a notion of management – as managing shadows of the organisations? In 1943 Jung e.g. wrote:

“As a consequence of his identification with the collective psyche he will try to force the demands of his subconscious onto others, because the identification with the collective psyche is followed by a sense of universality (godlikeness) which totally ignores all differences in the personal psyches of fellowmen.” (Jung 1967:42)

Can the dualism in either yang or yin be rephrased as the collective projection of both yang and of yin on others, creating positive yang at the expense of the negative yin? Is positive yang only the rejection of yin and in that case where does yin go? Of particular interest is a situation where the divide between conscious/subconscious is exceptionally large or grandiose fronts take over the managerial role. What would happen if these collective projections are challenged? What kind of implications can this have for the organization and the people within them? What would it take for yang and yin to meet – possibly in consciousness? Empirical examples in the text are based on a field study of a merger together with the authors’ experience of working in an academic organization.

Mintzberg, H. (2001): The Yin and the Yang of Managing, Organizational Dynamics, 29(4): 306-312.

Jung, C. G. (1967): Jaget och det omedvetna (The self and the subconscious), Wahlström & Widstrand, Stockholm.

Keyword
Jung, archetypes, gender, academia
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5731 (URN)
Available from: 2008-06-13 Created: 2008-06-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications