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Cederfeldt, Mikael
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Wlazlak, P., Johansson, G. & Cederfeldt, M. (2012). A study of the R&D-Manufacturing interface in distributed settings: Experiences from a Chinese manufacturing site.. Paper presented at 5th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS12).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study of the R&D-Manufacturing interface in distributed settings: Experiences from a Chinese manufacturing site.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19304 (URN)
Conference
5th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS12)
Available from: 2012-08-31 Created: 2012-08-31 Last updated: 2012-09-03Bibliographically approved
Johansson, J. & Cederfeldt, M. (2012). Interactive Case Based Reasoning through Visual Representation: Supporting the Reuse of Components in variant-rich products. In: D. Marjanovic, M. Storga, N. Pavkovic & N. Bojcetic (Ed.), Proceedings of DESIGN 2012, the 12th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia: . Paper presented at Design2012, May 21-24, 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia (pp. 1477-1485). The Design Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactive Case Based Reasoning through Visual Representation: Supporting the Reuse of Components in variant-rich products
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of DESIGN 2012, the 12th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] D. Marjanovic, M. Storga, N. Pavkovic & N. Bojcetic, The Design Society, 2012, p. 1477-1485Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Design Society, 2012
Keywords
case based reasoning, design automation
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-18177 (URN)978-953-7738-17-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Design2012, May 21-24, 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia
Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, G. & Cederfeldt, M. (2011). The role of decentralized purchasing to ensure supplier involvement in geographically dispersed new product projects. In: Jan-Eric Ståhl (Ed.), Proceedings of The 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS11. Paper presented at The 4th Swedish Production Symposium 2011, 3rd – 5th of May 2011. Lund University, Sweden (pp. 322-328). The Swedish Production Academy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of decentralized purchasing to ensure supplier involvement in geographically dispersed new product projects
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of The 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS11 / [ed] Jan-Eric Ståhl, The Swedish Production Academy , 2011, p. 322-328Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Swedish Production Academy, 2011
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17027 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Swedish Production Symposium 2011, 3rd – 5th of May 2011. Lund University, Sweden
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2012-07-25Bibliographically approved
Elgh, F. & Cederfeldt, M. (2010). Documentation and Management of Product Knowledge in Systems for Automated Variant Design: A Case Study. In: New World Situation - New Directions in Concurrent Engineering: Proceedings of the 17th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering, 6 - 10 September, 2010, Cracow, Poland, 2010 (pp. 213-220).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Documentation and Management of Product Knowledge in Systems for Automated Variant Design: A Case Study
2010 (English)In: New World Situation - New Directions in Concurrent Engineering: Proceedings of the 17th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering, 6 - 10 September, 2010, Cracow, Poland, 2010, 2010, p. 213-220Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A business strategy based on customized products with a high level of variety requires systems for efficient generation of product variants. The development of a system for automated variant design is a significant investment in time and money. To maintain the system’s usefulness over time, frequent updating of design rules and execution control will normally become a necessity. Significant efforts are required for maintenance and adapting an established system to changes in product technology, new product knowledge, production practices, new customers and so forth. Another important aspect that has been identified, is the reuse of the system encapsulated generic product family descriptions, for example design rules, when developing a new product family. In this paper a case study is presented with the objectives to provide an understanding and an insight into a real industrial case. A focus is put on the documentation and management of product related knowledge for the purpose of revealing problems related to the current state of practice at the company to identify areas for improvements. The results are based on the experiences from a case study at a company with long experience of systems for automated variant design.

Keywords
Design automation, documentation, traceability, case study
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-11645 (URN)10.1007/978-0-85729-024-3_23 (DOI)978-0-85729-023-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2010-02-22 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2010-10-07Bibliographically approved
Elgh, F. & Cederfeldt, M. (2008). Cost-based Producibility Assessment: Analysis and Synthesis Approaches through Design Automation. Journal of engineering design (Print), 19(2), 113-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-based Producibility Assessment: Analysis and Synthesis Approaches through Design Automation
2008 (English)In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 113-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The demand on high levels of reliability and accuracy of cost estimation increases in a competitive environment and as the products are getting more optimised. When different courses of action are to be evaluated, changes in customer requirements, design features and parameters, and production properties have to be handled with caution. Even small changes can imply: low level of conformability with the production system, highly increased cost, and extended manufacturing lead-time. It is of paramount importance for the product success and the company’s profit that a system for automated producibility assessment is sensitive and can reflect these effects. Two central tasks in the development of such a system are the definition of a cost model and the modelling of producibility rules. Each organisation is very different and therefore has to define their individual cost model and set of producibility rules. This work presents an approach that provides a framework for the development of company specific automated producibility estimation systems. Further, the concepts of analysis driven and synthesis driven producibility estimations are described and some examples of their use are given.

Keywords
Cost Estimation, Design Automation Development, Producibility Evaluation, Variant Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5597 (URN)doi:10.1080/09544820701802923 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-19 Created: 2008-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. & Cederfeldt, M. (2008). Product development-Production interface in a geographically dispersed setting. In: The 17th International Conference on Management of Technology, IAMOT 2008, Dubai. UAE: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product development-Production interface in a geographically dispersed setting
2008 (English)In: The 17th International Conference on Management of Technology, IAMOT 2008, Dubai. UAE, 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It has become more and more common for companies to move part of their production to low cost countries and/or closer to important markets. However, quite often the product development is not moved. The result is an increased distance between product development and production. The interface between the two departments is important to lead time, cost and quality and therefore the cooperation must work smoothly. To achieve this, most literature recommends early and tight cooperation. However this can be complicated by expensive and time consuming travels and/or usage of less rich communication such as emails and phone calls.

It is difficult to make the transition in general from product development to production and the possible problems increase with the distance. The PD-P interface consists of several components and how a problem in one component is affected by problems in other components is not explicitly discussed in literature. The purpose in this paper is to explore if there are such connections i.e. connections between an observable problem and other components in the PD-P interface in a geographically dispersed setting. The paper does so by merging the distributed work literature and the PD-P interface literature.

The analysis is based on four PD-P interface components; technological, organizational, scope and task. The analysis indicates that observable problems as e.g. low frequency of communication can be the symptom of one or a combination of problems. Connections between the components in the PD-P interface are exemplified in a geographically dispersed setting. Furthermore the underlying causes to the problems connected to the geographically dispersed setting in the PD-P interface are elucidated. In the case of low frequency of communication, it could be the technical system hindering communication and the different time zones disrupt it even more. Hence one symptom could be caused by different underlying problems. Each problem needs to be broken down to find the cause and the solution could be found in any of the four interface components.

The results indicate that the actual distance is not the biggest problem but uncertainties (e.g. new collaborations) and differences (culture and work methods) which increase lead time. We have also seen that single underling problems can cause problem in several of the PD-P interface components. This indicates that if these underlying problems can be solved the project results can be vastly improved. For example, trust issues occur in the scope component (affects the willingness to share information) and in the organizational interface component (both competence trust and goodwill trust affects involvement and commitment to the project). Consequently, if problems like this can be solved many other problems will become minor problems and project objectives will be more likely to be obtained. However trust is difficult to achieve with a geographical distance between product development and production. The analysis also indicates that due to the distance more attention is paid to the PD-P interface, e.g. more experienced team members are appointed. This can be contributing to a smoother PD-P interface than expected.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5585 (URN)
Available from: 2008-05-15 Created: 2008-05-15 Last updated: 2016-11-25Bibliographically approved
Berglund, E., Birgersson, J. & Cederfeldt, M. (2008). Ten+ Years of Successful Workplace Learning through Host Company Collaboration. In: : . Paper presented at 4th International CDIO Conference, Hogeschool Gent, Gent, Belgium, June 16-19, 2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ten+ Years of Successful Workplace Learning through Host Company Collaboration
2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

For a period of more than ten years a very successful Host Company Program has been running at the School of Engineering at Jönköping University (JTH), Sweden. This program enables close collaboration between the university and its staff and the 500 regional host companies (HCs) who support the quality assurance of the engineering education given at the School of Engineering.

With the introduction of the principles of CDIO at JTH, the host company program and the engineering methodology course was seen as a pre-existing building block of CDIO. This paper will explain in more detail how the HCP is orchestrated at JTH as well as how it is perceived by university staff, the engineering students, and the HCs. Also, how the HCP fits the principles of CDIO will be discussed further together with what is needed to be refined within the HCP.

Keywords
Host company program, Industry collaboration, Engineering Curriculum
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6636 (URN)
Conference
4th International CDIO Conference, Hogeschool Gent, Gent, Belgium, June 16-19, 2008
Available from: 2008-10-27 Created: 2008-10-27 Last updated: 2014-07-09Bibliographically approved
Elgh, F. & Cederfeldt, M. (2007). Concurrent Cost Estimation as a Tool for Enhanced Producibility: System Development and Applicability for Producibility Studies. International Journal of Production Economics, 109(1-2), 12-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concurrent Cost Estimation as a Tool for Enhanced Producibility: System Development and Applicability for Producibility Studies
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 109, no 1-2, p. 12-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper aims at presenting the thoughts behind concurrent cost estimation as a tool for engineering companies to obtain enhanced producibility for their products by the possibility of performing producibility studies. The two main parts of the paper are: the presentation of a method for system development, focusing on a number of general criteria of system development; and how such a system can act as a support in the product development process by providing the possibility of performing different types of producibility studies.

Keywords
Design for Producibility, Cost Estimation, Design Automation, System Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-3401 (URN)doi:10.1016/j.ijpe.2006.11.007 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-09-21 Created: 2007-09-21 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Cederfeldt, M. (2007). Planning Design Automation: A Structured Method and Supporting Tools. (Doctoral dissertation). Göteborg: Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Planning Design Automation: A Structured Method and Supporting Tools
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The demand for customised products that meet different markets and different customers is steadily increasing. Also, the demand for shorter lead times for the delivery of these customised products puts strains on design departments whose work tends to become increasingly repetitive. At the same time, designing variants takes time from innovative, original design, and/or problem-solving tasks. A powerful tool in the endeavour to cut lead times, workloads, and ultimately costs in order to become more competitive in an increasingly globalised market is Design Automation. Automating tedious and repetitive design tasks will free the designers to focus on the tasks that require skill, creativity, intuition, and cooperation to be solved. Consequently, seeing a need for design automation systems is not difficult. What becomes a lot more difficult is identifying the type, scope, and format of the system implementation, as well as the actual design tasks and activities to support or automate. Therefore, there is a need for structured and systematic approaches for the realisation and implementation of design automation systems. This research work is aimed at presenting such approaches, methods, and aids. It also addresses the importance of identifying the exact tasks to be automated. This has to be done in order to find the method and implementations best suited for solving the tasks, something that is especially important for companies whose human and financial resources might not allow them to invest in a system with functionality that vastly exceeds their actual needs.

The contribution of this work is a structured method for planning for design automation implementation. First, the design process is discussed from an automation perspective. Following this is a presentation of a framework of design automation. This framework has the purpose of serving as a common base for consensual discussions about design automation. In addition, it supports the setting-up of system specifications. The framework is followed by the introduction of a set of identifiers of system needs and potentials, focusing on the existing processes that need to be broken down and identified in order to specify the tasks to be automated. Following this is a set of criteria of system characteristics, focusing on properties of the intended system implementation. Finally, some realisation and implementation issues are addressed and exemplified through a number of pilot system implementations.

The presented method for planning design automation, together with the presented framework of design automation, provides implementers with issues to address regarding potential, need, scope, and format of system implementations. Further, it supports the weighing of desired system characteristics in order to find the right balance between system complexity and functionality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, 2007. p. 111 + apendix
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar vid Chalmers tekniska högskola, ISSN 0346-718X ; 2593
Keywords
Design automation, Planning, Evaluation, Process, Knowledge, Methods, Potential, Need
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-2501 (URN)978-91-7291-912-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
(English)
Available from: 2010-03-19 Created: 2007-06-13 Last updated: 2010-03-19Bibliographically approved
Cederfeldt, M. (2007). Towards a Strategy for Mapping of Design Problems to Suitable Solutions: A Case of Design Automation using CBR. Strojarstvo, 49(1), 17-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Strategy for Mapping of Design Problems to Suitable Solutions: A Case of Design Automation using CBR
2007 (English)In: Strojarstvo, ISSN 0562-1887, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to make the designing of product variants more efficient and effective there often exists the possibility of automating the process, or at least implementing some form of computer support to aid the designers. Designing though, is often not a simple and single task. Instead, it often consists of several interlinked sub-tasks that have to be performed either in some previously known order, iteratively, or perhaps even by inference. Furthermore, the levels of knowledge and task formalisation and process maturity may vary from known and clearly documented tasks (explicit), to known but undocumented tasks (implicit), or even unclear and unstructured tasks (ad-hoc).

In doing so a clearer picture of the actual design process will emerge and a problem definition and/or system specification can be outlined [Cederfeldt 2005]. This will in turn give rise to new questions that needs to be answered in parallel with setting up of a final system specification. Some of these questions address the choice of solution approach related to the design process and its inherent knowledge. This paper presents one such attempt at breaking down a design problem, defining its process character and capturing its inherent domain knowledge. This is then mapped to suitable tools, and computer implementations. One of the tools chosen in this work, Cased Based Reasoning (CBR), will be addressed further and some implementation issues of CBR as well as the advantages of a variant design approach to setting up of CBR indexing templates are discussed in more detail.

Keywords
Design automation, Solution strategy, Case based reasoning, Variant design
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6505 (URN)
Available from: 2008-10-03 Created: 2008-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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