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Maxwell, Gregor
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Maxwell, G. R., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2018). Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion. Frontiers in Education, 3, Article ID 41.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the use and validity of the International Classification of Functioning disability and health (ICF) as a common language for describing inclusive educational settings. There is a specific focus on investigating participation through the ICF as one aspect of inclusion as an improved understanding of participation as a measure of inclusion will greatly benefit children with additional support needs. In addition there will be a better understanding of the operationalization of participation, in terms of both policy and practice, and improved applications of the ICF. The study uses a narrative summary to review to analyse the findings from a selection of studies where the ICF has been used as a methodological tool in the field of education. In the 16 included studies the ICF is either used to present a new theoretical position, synthesize a new research approach or tool, or is integrated into the framework of an existing research method. Findings also show that the ICF is used in a number of different ways and that when it is used directly, variation is found in the type of information that was linked to ICF codes or categories. In conclusion further clarity on defining and measuring participation with the ICF framework is required in order to create a more consistent tool for investigating inclusive education. One way to improve the construct of participation is to take a bi-dimensional approach. It is the authors’ belief that this newer approach to modelling participation will be considered in any future revisions of the ICF/ICF-CY – a so-called ‘ICF-2’. This would thus create a more accountable classification framework that succeeds in capturing the involvement experience of the individual and in doing so achieves a more effective and useful classification framework for the field of inclusive education.

Keywords
ICF-CY, methodology, education, participation, inclusion
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40637 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2018.00041 (DOI)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Moretti, M., Maxwell, G. & Alves, I. (2012). A Systematic Literature Review of the Situation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health–Children and Youth Version in Education: A Useful Tool or a Flight of Fancy?. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 91(13), S103-S117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Systematic Literature Review of the Situation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health–Children and Youth Version in Education: A Useful Tool or a Flight of Fancy?
2012 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 91, no 13, p. S103-S117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents the outcome of a systematic literature review exploring theapplicability of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health(ICF) and its Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) at various levels and in processeswithin the education systems in different countries. A systematic databasesearch using selected search terms has been used. The selection of studies wasthen refined further using four protocols: inclusion and exclusion protocols at abstractand full text and extraction levels along with a quality protocol. Studies exploring thedirect relationship between education and the ICF/ICF-CY were sought.As expected, the results show a strong presence of studies from Englishspeakingcountries, namely from Europe and North America. The articles weremainly published in noneducational journals. The most used ICF/ICF-CY componentsare activity and participation, participation, and environmental factors.From the analysis of the papers included, the results show that the ICF/ICF-CY iscurrently used as a research tool, theoretical framework, and tool for implementingeducational processes. The ICF/ICF-CY can provide a useful language to theeducation field where there is currently a lot of disparity in theoretical, praxis, andresearch issues. Although the systematic literature review does not report a highincidence of the use of the ICF/ICF-CY in education, the results show that the ICF/ICF-CYmodel and classification have potential to be applied in education systems.

Keywords
ICF, ICF-CY, Education, Special Education
National Category
Social Sciences Medical and Health Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17957 (URN)10.1097/PHM.0b013e31823d53b2 (DOI)000208868800014 ()HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Projects
MURINET
Available from: 2012-04-18 Created: 2012-04-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. (2012). Bringing more to participation: Participation in school activities of persons with disability within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY). (Doctoral dissertation). Jönköping: School of Education and Communication
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bringing more to participation: Participation in school activities of persons with disability within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As societies the world over move towards defining inclusive and effective education systems this presents the educator with the new challenge of providing an equal and democratic education environment for all students. With children the nature of functioning and environmental settings varies greatly in comparison with adults and assessing children’s involvement in activities is of particular importance to ensure effective and inclusive society building through education. Building on the existing and previous participation research this thesis specifically aims to provide a means to theorize participation from two perspectives (frequency of attending and intensity of involvement) and put in to operation using five dimensions of the environment: availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability. Contextually this has been done by investigating children in need of additional support (including children with disabilities) at school. Results indicate that while research and theory take a holistic and balanced approach by using participation based on two perspectives, this has yet to filter down to practice. A new approach to measuring inclusive education using social capital, the five environmental dimensions, and the ICF-CY is proposed and tested. However, while the ICF-CY provides a consistent descriptive framework, no clear connections between social capital and inclusive education policy could be drawn and the five environmental dimensions – especially the involvement-related ones – need further development. The final paper presents evidence from the individual perspective for a third ICF-CY activities and participation qualifier to represent the subjective experience of involvement. Participation can thus be regarded as a multi-dimensional phenomenon with two main conceptual roots: sociology and developmental psychology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: School of Education and Communication, 2012. p. 200
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar från Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, ISSN 1652-7933 ; 16
Series
Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 42
Keywords
Participation, involvement, frequency, child, ICF-CY, inclusive educa-tion, policy
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-18079 (URN)978-91-628-8484-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-15, Hb116, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan Jönköping, Jönköping, Jönköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
MURINET project (Multidisciplinary Research Network on Health and Disability in Europe, European Commission project funded within the Sixth Framework Programme, MRTN-CT-2006-035794).
Available from: 2012-05-24 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G., Augustine, L. & Granlund, M. (2012). Does thinking and doing the same thing amount to involved participation? Empirical explorations for finding a measure of intensity for a third ICF-CY qualifier. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 15(4), 274-283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does thinking and doing the same thing amount to involved participation? Empirical explorations for finding a measure of intensity for a third ICF-CY qualifier
2012 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 274-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Participation as involvement in a situation includes two dimensions; doing the activity and the experience of involvement.

Objectives: The ICF-CY only measures doing using the capacity and performance qualifiers, a dimension measuring the experience is needed; a third qualifier. Hypothesis: The experienced involvement of pupils in school activities is higher when thinking and doing coincided.

Methods: By comparing self-reported experiences of involvement of children, data about what children were thinking and doing during activities were gathered from 21 children with and 19 without disabilities in inclusive classrooms.

Results: A relationship exists between an index of the subjective experience of involvement and whether children were thinking and doing the same things.

Conclusion: This index can be constructed using measures of concentration, control, involvement, and motivation. Choice is influential, as knowledge about why an activity is undertaken affects involvement. Additionally, increased subjective experience of involvement gives better psychological health and well-being.

Keywords
ICF-CY, qualifiers, participation, involvement, disability, education
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20200 (URN)10.3109/17518423.2012.689780 (DOI)000305963900005 ()
Available from: 2013-01-08 Created: 2013-01-08 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Koutsogeorgou, E., Maxwell, G., Aluas, M., Moretti, M. & Quintas, R. (2012). Evaluating social capital indicators and national inclusive education policies in six European countries. International Journal of Inclusive Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating social capital indicators and national inclusive education policies in six European countries
Show others...
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates how measures of social capital correspond with inclusive education policies by linking both to the ICF-CY. The method employs cross-country comparative analyses of six European countries – Germany, Greece, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom – based on social capital indicators from the European Social Survey (Round 4-2008), along with comparison on the level of inclusive education policies within these countries by analyzing policies from a participation perspective. The results indicate that the ICF-CY is a useful tool for measuring both social capital and inclusive education policies, and although no connections could be drawn between social capital and inclusive education policy, the ICF-CY provided a consistent and common language for describing health and its related topics.

Keywords
special education, social context, educational policy, content analysis
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Law and Society Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-18078 (URN)
Projects
MURINET project (Multidisciplinary Research Network on Health and Disability in Europe, European Commission project funded within the Sixth Framework Programme, MRTN-CT-2006-035794).
Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G., Alves, I. & Granlund, M. (2012). Participation and environmental aspects in education and the ICF and the ICF-CY: findings from a systematic literature review. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 15(1), 63-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation and environmental aspects in education and the ICF and the ICF-CY: findings from a systematic literature review
2012 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 63-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This paper presents findings from a systematic review of the literature related to participation and the ICF/ICF-CY in educational research.

Objectives: To analyse how and investigate the application of participation in educational research. Specifically, how participation is related to the environmental dimensions availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability and acceptability.

Methods: A systematic literature review using database keyword searches and refinement protocols using inclusion and exclusion criteria at abstract, full-text and extraction.

Results: Four hundred and twenty-one initial works were found. Twenty-three met the inclusion criteria. Availability and accommodations are the most investigated dimensions. Operationalization of participation is not always consistent with definitions used.

Conclusion: Research is developing a holistic approach to investigating participation as, although all papers reference at least one environmental dimension, only four of the 11 empirical works reviewed present a fully balanced approach when theorizing and operationalizing participation; hopefully this balanced approach will continue and influence educational policy and school practice.

Keywords
Participation, environment, ICF, ICF-CY, disability, education
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17954 (URN)10.3109/17518423.2011.633108 (DOI)000299295400009 ()HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2012-04-18 Created: 2012-04-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. & Koutsogeorgou, E. (2012). Using Social Capital to Construct a Conceptual International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Children and Youth Version-Based Framework for Stronger Inclusive Education Policies in Europe. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 91(13), S118-S123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Social Capital to Construct a Conceptual International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Children and Youth Version-Based Framework for Stronger Inclusive Education Policies in Europe
2012 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 91, no 13, p. S118-S123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inclusive education is part of social inclusion; therefore, social capital can be linkedto an inclusive education policy and practice. This association is explored in thisarticle, and a practical measure is proposed. Specifically, the World Health Organization’sInternational Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Childrenand Youth Version (ICF-CY) is proposed as the link between social capital andinclusive education. By mapping participation and trust indicators of social capitalto the ICF-CY and by using the Matrix to Analyse Functioning in Education Systems(MAFES) to analyze the functioning of inclusive education policies and systems,a measure for stronger inclusive education policies is proposed. Such a toolcan be used for policy planning and monitoring to ensure better inclusive educationenvironments. In conclusion, combining enhanced social capital linked tostronger inclusive education policies, by using the ICF-CY, can lead to better healthand well-being for all.

Keywords
Mainstreaming (Education), Social Networks, World Health Organization, Public Policy
National Category
Sociology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17955 (URN)10.1097/PHM.0b013e31823d4b92 (DOI)000208868800015 ()HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Projects
MURINET
Available from: 2012-04-18 Created: 2012-04-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. & Augustine, L. (2011). Frequency and intensity ratings of school-related participation experiences. In: NNDR 2011 11th Research Conference: Abstracts. Paper presented at Nordic Network on Disability Research 2011, Reykjavík, Iceland May 27 – 28, 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequency and intensity ratings of school-related participation experiences
2011 (English)In: NNDR 2011 11th Research Conference: Abstracts, 2011Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper compares the self-reported experience of pupils with an additional support need(including children with disabilities) of being involved with what they were thinking or doing with aview to creating a measure of intensity by using these research questions:When thinking and doing descriptions are positively correlated is a child involved in an activity?Does this correlate with whether the child thinks he or she was focused on the activity?How does the frequency and intensity of participation of school-aged children with additional needsin an educational setting manifest itself within the International Classification of Functioning,Disability & Health, Child & Youth version (ICF-CY) framework?MethodsData were gathered from an existing study of participation in school environments of students withdisabilities in Sweden carried out by the second author. The data-set consists of data collected fromschools which contain both frequency and intensity data. The frequency data are in the form ofquestionnaires and the intensity data came from self-reports. The data came from self-reportingquestionnaires gathered a random points during the course of a normal school week by prompting22 children with additional needs and 22 controls with pagers. Data about what each child wasthinking about and doing will be analysed along with data on the child’s rating of being focused.Additional data were gathered relating to the child’s mood, interpretation of the importance andcomplexity of the situation, and with whom they were doing the activity. All items have been codedwith ICF-CY values using the Cieza et al. (2005) coding rules and will be analysed using factoranalysis and multi-variant methods to identify if a measure of the intensity of participation can bemade and whether this could be an additional qualifier within the ICF-CY framework.

Cieza, A., et al. (2005). ICF linking rules: an update based on lessons learned. J. Rehab Med, 37,212-218.

Keywords
ICF, ICF-CY, activity, participation, qualifiers
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17958 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Network on Disability Research 2011, Reykjavík, Iceland May 27 – 28, 2011
Projects
CHILD
Available from: 2012-04-18 Created: 2012-04-18 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. & Granlund, M. (2011). How are conditions for participation expressed in education policy documents?: A review of documents in Scotland and Sweden. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 26(2), 251-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are conditions for participation expressed in education policy documents?: A review of documents in Scotland and Sweden
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 251-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study approaches inclusive schools by looking at how conditions for participation are expressed for pupils with additional support needs in education policy documents in Sweden and Scotland. By using five dimensions of the environment – availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability – expressions of conditions for participation are explored in 41 documents. This is done in a vertical manner by analysing national laws, regional policy documents, and local-level documents which directly influence classroom practices. A deductive content analysis approach using a protocol based on the five environmental dimensions is used to extract information and identify meaning units. In the meaning units meaningful concepts are identified and linked to ICF-CY categories. These are used as reference points. It is suggested, from the documents analysed, that conditions for participation are easy to express as available, accessible opportunities, or affordability issues, but not as involvement experiences linked to accommodations made and acceptability issues within a context. Documents in Scotland and Sweden also have different foci in terms of conditions for participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2011
Keywords
education policy, document analysis, ICF-CY, environmental conditions, participation
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13878 (URN)10.1080/08856257.2011.563610 (DOI)
Projects
MURINET
Funder
EU, European Research Council, MRTN-CT-2006-035794
Available from: 2010-12-07 Created: 2010-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. & Koutsogeorgou, E. (2011). Inclusive Education in Europe: A practical Application of an ICF-CY-based Framework as a Tool for Inclusive Education Policies. In: ECER 2011, Urban Education. Paper presented at ECER 2011, Urban Education.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive Education in Europe: A practical Application of an ICF-CY-based Framework as a Tool for Inclusive Education Policies
2011 (English)In: ECER 2011, Urban Education, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Based on previous theoretical work which proposes the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Children and Youth Version (the ICF-CY) (WHO, 2007) as a bridge to link social capital and inclusive education (Maxwell & Koutsogeorgou, in press 2011), this paper presents the findings from the practical application of the ICF-CY as a framework for building stronger and healthier societies by improving inclusion through social change.

Policy reviews, reports and approaches to inclusive education demonstrate various differences between countries. The aim of this article is not only to provide an insight on the issue of inclusion in education from a sociological perspective, but also to identify the influence or connection of social capital with the decision-making and design of policies which ensure participation by creating inclusive education environments based on published resources for the following six European countries: Germany, Greece Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.. This could be performed through an overview of the level of social capital – for each of the countries in question – in relation to an overview of the level of the quality of the inclusive education policies for children with disabilities within these countries. The level of quality was considered in terms of five core themes: availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability (Maxwell & Granlund, in press 2011) based on the countries’ official documentation for inclusive education policies for children with disability. Are there any similar tendencies between the level of social capital and the level of quality of inclusive education policies in these European countries?

Inclusion, social capital, and the ICF-CY framework as a tool for inclusive education policies

Social capital - consisting of formal and informal social networks, trust and civic norms - is known to be a social determinant of health (CSDH, 2008). Similarly, it is known that inclusion - the integration, valuing and involvement of all in society - is a social determinant of health and also an outcome of social capital as a measure of social inclusion (CSDH, 2008). This paper takes this argument a step further by focusing on the correlation between social capital and inclusive education towards the further development of inclusive environments for children with disabilities within a European context. Social capital potential indicators are mapped to the ICF-CY, in combination with the use of the MAFES (Hollenweger, 2010) matrix as an instrument for analyzing the functioning of inclusive education policies and systems, as well as a tool for policy-planning and monitoring of issues of inclusive education environments in Europe.

Method

Social capital indicators: comparative analysis Social capital indicators have been identified for the six European countries using data from the European Social Survey (ESS) 2008 ed.3.0. Online Analysis provided by the official online source of the ESS, was used and appropriate weights were applied. The following list of variables/questions were identified as social capital indicators: Non-face-to-face communication: personal use of internet Personal use of internet, World Wide Web, e-mail Social trust Participation in politics (voter participation) Social inclusion: meeting socially Social support: having someone to discuss personal matters with Subjective well-being: feeling of safety in neighbourhood after dark Participation in public religious practices. Comparative analysis of these indicators between the six countries was performed, plus, the indicators were mapped to the ICF-CY (e.g. the indicator: Participation in politics can be mapped to the ICF-CY code: d950) interpreting each question’s meaning from a solely sociological perspective. The results of the mapping process of social capital indicators to ICF-CY can provide a guide for the practical measurement of the level of social capital by using the ICF-CY which could be potentially considered as a tool for policy-making in inclusive education settings.

Expected Outcomes

The preliminary phase of the comparative analysis included ESS data for Sweden and United Kingdom. From this phase, social capital appeared to operate in the intermediate level – between the micro and macro level. Although Sweden appeared as having overall higher rates on the selected social capital indicators compared to United Kingdom, none of the amount of differences of the response rates exceeded the 20 percent. Therefore, one could conclude that since no ample difference was observed on the rates of social capital indicators, then the two countries’ social capital levels were similar. However, previous studies have identified differences on aspects of social capital between European regions (Adam 2008; Knack & Keefer 1997), and accordingly differences are expected to emerge within the present study too since the comparative analysis has been based on data from countries of different European regions. Evident differences between Sweden and United Kingdom have been already identified on inclusive education policies on five core themes: availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability (Maxwell & Granlund, in press 2011). Further analysis including other European countries will expand on these findings and allow comparison on the levels of social capital and inclusive education policies within these countries.

References

Adam F. Mapping social capital across Europe: findings, trends and methodological shortcomings of cross-national surveys. Social Science Information. June 1, 2008 2008;47(2):159-186. CSDH. (2008). Closing the gap in a generation : health equity through action on the social determinants of health : final report of the commission on social determinants of health. Geneva: World Health Organization. Hollenweger, J. (2010). MHADIE's matrix to analyse the functioning of education systems. [Article]. Disability & Rehabilitation, 32, S116-S124. Doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.520809 Knack S, Keefer P. Does Social Capital Have An Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation*. Quarterly Journal of Economics. 1997;112(4):1251-1288. Maxwell, G., & Granlund, M. (in press 2011). How are conditions for participation expressed in education policy documents? A review of documents in Scotland and Sweden. European Journal of Special Needs Education. Maxwell, G., & Koutsogeorgou, E. (in press 2011). Inclusive education in Europe for children with disabilities: A conceptual ICF-CY-based framework as a tool for social-based inclusive education policies. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. McGonigal, J., Doherty, R., Allan, J., Mills, S., Catts, R., Redford, M., et al. (2007). Social Capital, Social Inclusion and Changing School Contexts: A Scottish Perspective. British Journal of Educational Studies, 55(1), 77-94. WHO. (2007). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Version for Children & Youth (ICF-CY). Geneva: World Health Organization.

National Category
Social Sciences Sociology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17959 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2011, Urban Education
Available from: 2012-04-18 Created: 2012-04-18 Last updated: 2012-05-24
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