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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Filipovic, Z. (2018). Black and Ashamed: Deconstructing Race in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. In: Barry Sheils & Julie Walsh (Ed.), Shame and Modern Writing: (pp. 112-132). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black and Ashamed: Deconstructing Race in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man
2018 (English)In: Shame and Modern Writing / [ed] Barry Sheils & Julie Walsh, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 112-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper will consider the significance of racial shame for the constitution of the black subject and determine its implications for our reading of invisibility in Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man. I will argue that the primary expression of black American experience and its determination within the narrow orbit of white narrative is the affective experience of shame. Implicated in the racialized metaphysics of power relations that dominates Ellison’s world, shame both foments the violence of internalized oppression and the violence of self-valorizing racial orthodoxy in black nationalisms. Departing from Foucault’s notion of subjectivization whereby agency is determined by the individualizing strategies of power, the paper, however, plots a different narrative of invisibility in Ellison’s novel that harbors emancipatory possibilities. The totalizing regimes of identification that articulate and structure our social existence will be shown to be effectively undermined by Ellison’s intervention in the racial imaginary, testifying to his ability to look beyond the blockages of his present and anticipate alternate forms of subjectivity that are yet to be realized in the constituencies of our history.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Literature
Keywords
Critical race theory, Affect theory, race, shame, Deconstruction, différance, Foucalut, Agamben, Fanon, Du Bois
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37486 (URN)2-s2.0-85049164452 (Scopus ID)978-1-138-06727-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-15875-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2017). Mimicry and Shame in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men and Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss. Comparative Critical Studies, 14(2-3), 205-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mimicry and Shame in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men and Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss
2017 (English)In: Comparative Critical Studies, ISSN 1744-1854, E-ISSN 1750-0109, Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. 205-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reflecting on the affective nature of diasporic experience, the essay begins by developing Arendt's understanding of displacement as a temporal disjunction of being caught between the claims of the past and the exigencies of the present. The impossibility of salvaging the past against the often stifling imperatives of the present that she accounts for in her essay 'We Refugees' is, however, also what produces affective economies in the diasporic subject that I argue are crucial to diasporic identity formation. In this respect, I focus on shame, which I see as an affective residue of the unsalvageable past in the experience of displacement. In order to determine and further develop the significance of shame for diasporic subject formation, this essay will consider its impact on subjectivity in a comparative close reading of two contemporary novels, V. S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men and Kiran Desai's The Inheritance of Loss, both of which manifest the elision of the past in diasporized subjects and the movement towards strategies of identification articulated in mimicry. Mimicry, seen in Fanon's rather than Bhabha's terms, as a disavowal of the past, fails, however, to provide a viable strategy of identification for a diasporic subject in the novels that testify rather to the affective cost of our incumbent efforts to start anew. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh University Press, 2017
Keywords
salvage, maintain, preserve, reconstitute, holding on, vestige, residue, loss, unsalvageable, letting go, disavowal, effacement, disarticulate, Affect theory, shame, diasporic idenity, Postcolonial studies, Bhabha, Fanon
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37485 (URN)10.3366/ccs.2017.0236 (DOI)000432024900006 ()2-s2.0-85046886049 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2017). “The Ethics of Comopolitan Memory”. In: : . Paper presented at American Comparative Literature Association (Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht, 6-9 July, 2017).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The Ethics of Comopolitan Memory”
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Cosmpolitanism, memory, archive Trauma studies, Derrida, Agamben
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37493 (URN)
Conference
American Comparative Literature Association (Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht, 6-9 July, 2017)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2017-10-05
Filipovic, Z. (2017). Towards an ethics of shame. Angelaki, 22(4), 99-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards an ethics of shame
2017 (English)In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Departing from Levinas, this paper will address the significance of shame in contemporary discourse in order to approach what could be called its ethical intrigue. Focusing on its political, social and phenomenological implications, I intend to reconsider the experience of shame as it has been appropriated within the politics of affect and account for its relation to ethics, which alone can reveal its transformative possibilities. Shame will emerge as an affect of proximity whose basic structure of being exposed is an attestation of our constitutive openness to others that towers above the politics of interest and the structures of economy that advance the drama of the Ego.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
continental philosophy, shame, politics, normativity, Levinas, ethics, sincerity
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37484 (URN)10.1080/0969725X.2017.1406050 (DOI)000417571500007 ()2-s2.0-85038081170 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2016). Black and Ashamed: Racial Shame in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, 30 Sept-1 Oct, 2016).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black and Ashamed: Racial Shame in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper will argue that the primary expression of the traumatic experience that constitutes black American identity and its determination within the narrow orbit of white narrative is the affective experience of shame. Implicated in the racialized metaphysics of power relations that dominates Ellison’s world, shame foments the violence of internalized oppression and sets in motion contradictory desires that either move towards identification and mimicry or the self-valorizing practices of racial orthodoxy in nationalist movements. Both reproduce violence and reinforce the structures of invisibility that force black subjectivity underground. Shame, as the exposure of blackness under the white gaze, will here emerge as the contorted cry of history forced out of the violated, lashed, black body that haunts and conditions any perception of the present that would stabilize black identity. Using a range of discursive structures within which shame has been theorized, the paper will show its significance for our reading of invisibility in Ellison’s novel and its implications for the fact that race legislates for identity.

Keywords
Crtical Race Theory, Affect theory, shame, race, Deconstruction, différance, Foucault, Fanon, Du Bois
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37492 (URN)
Conference
Ninth Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, 30 Sept-1 Oct, 2016)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2016). “The Immigrant and Me: Letting Go or Holding On”. In: : . Paper presented at Salvage, British Comparative Literature Association (University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, July 12-15, 2016).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The Immigrant and Me: Letting Go or Holding On”
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Arendt, diasporic idenity, shame, Affect theory, Postcolonial theory, Bhabha, Fanon
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37491 (URN)
Conference
Salvage, British Comparative Literature Association (University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, July 12-15, 2016)
Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2017-10-05
Filipovic, Z. (2013). Not Human Enough: Levinas and a Call for New (Old) Humanism. In: Roberto Cantú, Cal State University, LA (Ed.), An Insatiable Dialectic: Essays on Critique, Modernity, and Humanism (pp. 104-120). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not Human Enough: Levinas and a Call for New (Old) Humanism
2013 (English)In: An Insatiable Dialectic: Essays on Critique, Modernity, and Humanism / [ed] Roberto Cantú, Cal State University, LA, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 104-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The humanity of man, Levinas argues in Humanism of the Other, is not defined by rationality or subjectivism of freedom, it is found instead in absolute humility and subjection of my freedom to the vulnerability of others. Indeed, for Levinas, the subject itself is constituted as singular or unique by an assignation of responsibility it cannot escape. The fact that no one can respond to the distress of others in my stead is what so imperially consigns me to my idenitity.

 

The critique of humanism that is implicit in Levinas does not testify so much to its failure as to the hypocrisy of the humanist projects based on reason, integrity, autonomy and the dignity of the subject, its naive rights of freedom and self-assertion often appropriated by the discourses of exploitation and used as a shameless pretext for virile imperialism and colonial aggression. Instead, for Levians, humanism has not risen to the true height of its ideals, of what it means to be human. It is the status and the menaing of this ideal that this paper will question. For to be human is to be called to goodness such that the other counts more than myself. Freedom of the subject, ‘is not the source of all right and meaning,’ as Levians writes in Ethics and Infinity. It is rather the possibility of self-sacrifice and being for the other. Being called to goodness is being sobered up to a responsibility that for Levians is manifested as the-one-for-the-other, even as ‘substitution unto death.’ To be human is to call into question the prejudice of my freedom and my self-righteousness. It is to discover onself in passivity. The other person’s vulnerability, his mortality, comes as the effraction of my being, of my rights, and exposes the injustice of my selfish will. True humanness seems, in fact, to demand more than my capacity. I am thus never responsible enough, I am never human enough. The presence of the other person, the unabated pathos of his need and vulnerability, revelas me to my own shame, to a kind of self-effacement and absolute discretion of my own presence. There is a supplication to a freedom that precedes mine and to respond to it is to be human.

 

This paper will point towards a certain insufficiency of humanism and the inheritance of its concept in the context of Levinas’s writing as an expression a post-Enlightenment critique both of the notions of freedom and autonomy that are put in question in the responsibility for the other but also in terms of its pre-critical naivité about ‘the human nature’ and the metaphysics of the unified subject. Self-relation is broken in Levinas by infinite incumbent responsibilities that devolve on the subject like an insolvent debt one can never settle in good conscience. The self with all its resources is in a permanent deficit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013
Keywords
Humanism, Levinas, ethics, responsibility, the other, Humanism, Levinas, etik, ansvar, den andre
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20293 (URN)9781443852920 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2011). Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas: ‘After you, sir!’. Moderna Språk, 105(1), 58-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas: ‘After you, sir!’
2011 (English)In: Moderna Språk, ISSN 0026-8577, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 58-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2011
Keywords
Levinas, ethics, responsibility, the other, Levinas, etik, ansvar, den andre
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20291 (URN)000298039200004 ()
Available from: 2013-01-21 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Filipovic, Z. (2011). (Mis)reading Proust: Style, Rhetoric, Allegory. In: Eva Ahlstedt (Ed.), Theorising textuality. Theorising reading: om vetenskaplig teoribildning inom kultur- och litteraturforskning (pp. 105-117). Göteborgs: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för språk och litteraturer, 3(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(Mis)reading Proust: Style, Rhetoric, Allegory
2011 (English)In: Theorising textuality. Theorising reading: om vetenskaplig teoribildning inom kultur- och litteraturforskning / [ed] Eva Ahlstedt, Göteborgs: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för språk och litteraturer , 2011, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 105-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The incursion of style upon our ability to read, indeed of stylus, of a pointed object that “might be used in a vicious attack against what philosophy appeals to in the name of matter,” as Derrida writes in Spurs, will here take the form of specific tropological concerns that will be given in terms of Paul de Man’s understanding of allegory and reading. Style, inescapably tied to rhetoric and figurativity as a mode of expression, would be a syncope of cognition present in every text. A disruptive possibility of the text that outmatches its potential to be read. Style, seen in these terms, is a certain excess/lack of text that opens to a jouissance of reading, the pain of having read always too much or too little, of always having read otherwise. What the rhetorical structure of reading points to, as we shall see in de Man’s reading of Proust, is the radical impossibility of its closure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborgs: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för språk och litteraturer, 2011
Series
Studia interdisciplinaria linguistica et litteraria = SILL ; 3
Keywords
Proust, de Man, Derrida, Style, Rhetoric, Allegory
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20292 (URN)978-91-633-9417-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-21 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3264-9173

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