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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Achtenhagen, L., Ekberg, S. & Melander, A. (2017). Fostering growth through business development: Core activities and challenges for micro-firm entrepreneurs. Journal of Management and Organization, 23(2), 167-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering growth through business development: Core activities and challenges for micro-firm entrepreneurs
2017 (English)In: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 167-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a concept stemming from practice, business development has received scarce academic attention. In this paper, we explore core business development activities of micro-firms and the challenges they perceive in conducting them. Based on interviews with 30 micro-firms, we identify three core business development activities that leverage the firm's resource base, complemented by three support activities that secure and organize the firm's resources. We find the business development activities to be tightly related to the three practices of leveraging, securing and organizing resources. We also identify three important contextual influences on business development in micro-firms: industry, age and if the firm is in an incubator. Our findings contribute to developing a conceptualization and theorization of business development for micro-firms, which is relevant as the vast majority of companies worldwide are micro-firms, but many never embark on a growth path. Based on our results, we outline practical implications, for example, how companies could overcome their perceived lack of time and an agenda for future research encouraging further studies comprising micro-firms with different qualities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
growth, micro-firms, Penrose, resource practices, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35192 (URN)10.1017/jmo.2016.58 (DOI)000395506300002 ()2-s2.0-85013665842 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Ekberg, S. (2017). The role of organizational integrity in responses to pressures: A case study of Australian newspapers. (Doctoral dissertation). Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of organizational integrity in responses to pressures: A case study of Australian newspapers
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the dissertation is to explore the role of organizational integrity in responses to pressures. Organizational integrity is a concept from old institutional theory; its definition is the fidelity to the organization’s core values, distinctive competence, guiding principles, and mission. Studying this concept empirically will answer calls in institutional theory to focus more on the internal dynamics in terms of the responses to pressures, especially how the people in the organization balance the act to conform or resist pressures while striving for legitimacy. These calls have remained largely unanswered, and the question of how organizations adapt while remaining true to core values and competences remains something of a mystery. Joining the recent resurgence of Selznick’s research, the aim of this dissertation is to contribute to the calls to focus on change and inertia together, and the role of values as the organization responds to pressures. Thus, change can be a threat to the organizational integrity and prompts members of the organization to preserve their familiar environment. However, this behavior creates a dilemma, since the maintenance of organizational integrity can be taken too far, to the point that the organization becomes rigid and unable to survive. Thus, it includes the organization finding a balance of staying true to its proclaimed mission and values without being too rigid and losing track of the changes in its environment. Therefore, by giving emphasis to the role of values, organizational integrity adds a new perspective and extends the understanding of how organizations respond to pressures.

To fulfil this aim, this dissertation followed two newspaper organizations, an industry that is marked by a state of flux and disruptive change. The two organizations are The Courier-Mail and The West Australian. By using methods such as interviews, documentation, and observations, I got a first-hand understanding of the perceived pressures the organizational members are facing, the issues that were perceived in the organization, and how the organizational members worked to resolve them. Through these cases, the organizations either conformed and/or resisted pressures, thus allowing this study to explore the role of organizational integrity in this process. The findings suggest that the organization’s values, distinctiveness, and mission were used to evaluate experiments to solve issues rather than solely guiding the strategies to overcome the pressures. Thus, the study highlights the perceived pressures, how organizational members construct issues based on these pressures, and how the organizational members work to resolve them.

This dissertation extends the understanding of organizational behavior in terms of balancing change and inertia. Organizational integrity works as a normative rationality, and to uphold legitimacy the role of organizational integrity is either to maintain, defend, or repair the character of the organization. More specifically, this adds to the scholarly discussion of the importance of values in organizational behavior, and this dissertation expands the understanding of responses to pressures by explicating the role of organizational integrity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, 2017. p. 294
Series
JIBS Dissertation Series, ISSN 1403-0470 ; 116
National Category
Business Administration Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37292 (URN)978-91-86345-76-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-06, B1014, Internationella Handelshögskolan, Jönköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2017-09-13Bibliographically approved
Almgren, S. & Ekberg, S. (2013). User-Generated Content: Organizational Routines and Participatory Practices. In: : . Paper presented at Digital Transformations and Transactions in Media Industries, 13-15 June 2013, Bournemouth University UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User-Generated Content: Organizational Routines and Participatory Practices
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This review focuses user-generated content (UGC) in the mainstream media context. The review illuminates different facets of the notion of UGC, as it follows the interlocked and subsequent links in a chain from the mainstream media organizations, the professional journalistic practices, the generated content, the users, and finally the views on the generated content and the users generating it. The contribution of the review is twofold; 1) mapping the field’s current state and its counterpoints from a cohesive and interdisciplinary perspective and, 2) letting the review fall into the construction of ideal type sets that can be used for further theoretical development of the field.

Keywords
UGC, user-generated content, participatory journalism, citizen journalism
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21247 (URN)
Conference
Digital Transformations and Transactions in Media Industries, 13-15 June 2013, Bournemouth University UK
Available from: 2013-06-17 Created: 2013-05-28 Last updated: 2014-02-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5650-3342

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