Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Lindmark, U., Bülow, P. H., Mårtensson, J., Rönning, H., Ahlstrand, I., Broström, A., . . . Sandgren, A. (2019). The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review. Nursing Open, 6(3), 664-675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and to explore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health and social work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between 2003–2013.

Design

An integrative literature review.

Methods

PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Index and AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles including the concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articles are in accordance to Meleis' typologies of transition by experts in each discipline. Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Results

Meleis' four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except development in oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored, whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
literature review, nursing theory, occupational therapy, oral health, social welfare, social work, theory–practice gap, transition
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43307 (URN)10.1002/nop2.249 (DOI)000476917700002 ()31367388 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069778425 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V., Hemmingsson, H., Hydén, L.-C. & Borell, L. (2013). Managing Family Relations and Controlling Information While Supporting an Allergic Child. Qualitative Sociology Review, 4(3), 204-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Family Relations and Controlling Information While Supporting an Allergic Child
2013 (English)In: Qualitative Sociology Review, ISSN 1733-8077, E-ISSN 1733-8077, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 204-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores parental (particularly mothers’) support in the daily lives of children with allergies in a Swedish context. An ordinary life is established by making comparisons to what other children without allergies presumably can do (and eat). Although the parents’ goal is to support their child in managing allergies, neither their practical nor their interactional strategies work in a clear-cut direction to promote the child’s ordinary life and identity. On the contrary, parents’ accounts convey that they function just as much against an everyday life and the child’s identity. When managing family relations, parents expect immediate family members (specifically grandparents) to understand and accommodate the child’s needs. However, claims of family responsibility are made through moral tales about lack of support from “generalized others.” Family responsibility is also downplayed in parents’ accounts as demands of support may put parents’ moral self at risk. The strategy of information control in certain situations and (non-family) relations used to keep the child safe may risk stigmatizing the child, alternatively, making the child into a social threat. One of the conclusions that could be drawn from this study is that claims of family support may be contradictory to other cultural principles that ascribe responsibilities between families and individuals, as the principles of individual freedom and autonomy.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21704 (URN)2-s2.0-84880936227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-07-31 Created: 2013-07-31 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V., Hemmingsson, H. & Hydén, L.-C. (2013). Mothers' accounts of healthcare encounters: Negotiating culpability and fulfilling the active mother role. Discourse & Society, 24(4), 446-460
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers' accounts of healthcare encounters: Negotiating culpability and fulfilling the active mother role
2013 (English)In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 446-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores mothers’ accounts of initial interactions and encounters with healthcare professionals and the outcomes where questions about their children’s problems are concerned. A case-based storyline was reconstructed as part of the analysis, focusing on when and how mothers claimed to be responsible parents. The outcomes of these encounters were presented by the mothers in this study as a drawn-out process, with disagreement between mothers and healthcare providers, resulting in different performances of moral agency. Some mothers portrayed themselves as dependent on healthcare expertise and made moral claims by attributing and deflecting blame, negotiating back and forth about their own and the healthcare professionals’ culpability, restoring moral agency. Other mothers did not generally defend or justify their actions or place blame, but appealed instead to fulfilment of the active mother role where they controlled the interaction and claimed full responsibility for their child’s care, hence presenting their moral agency as indisputable.                 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21120 (URN)10.1177/0957926513482069 (DOI)000321190200003 ()2-s2.0-84879528141 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-05-02 Created: 2013-05-02 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2011). Parenting Children with Allergy. (Doctoral dissertation). Solna: Reproprint
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parenting Children with Allergy
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Solna: Reproprint, 2011. p. 60
Series
Karolinska Institutet Dissertation
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21104 (URN)ISBN 978‐91‐7457‐593‐4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-05-13 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2013-05-13Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. & Hydén, L.-C. (2009). Organizing allergy and being a “good” parent: Parents’ narratives about their children’s emerging problems. Health, 13(2), 157-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing allergy and being a “good” parent: Parents’ narratives about their children’s emerging problems
2009 (English)In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article focuses on the early and problem-solving phases of the child's illness trajectory and on how child allergies are constructed and organized by the parents in a moral everyday context. The parents' narratives were reconstructed as narratives, describing the pathways parents take before they decide to seek professional medical aid as well as showing how they construct themselves as responsible parents. Before consulting health professionals the parents have often tried a range of different ways to define, control and manage their children's various problems. Allergy problems were interpreted and responded to differently, depending on the way they emerged in everyday life. Acute reactions quickly led to an illness definition and a diagnosis. Gradual and diffuse problems were not so easily defined. They were at first interpreted and responded to as normal infant problems, but, through the parents' readiness and various situational and temporal clues, they were organized as symptoms of illness. Parents seek medical aid when their own strategies fail or do not fully work, but their decisions are also formed within a pre-problem context of their moral accountability as parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2009
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21075 (URN)10.1177/1363459308099682 (DOI)000264284600002 ()19228826 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-60749114187 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-04-30 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2007). Allergins tillblivelse: Föräldrars berättelser om hur barnetskroppsliga besvär identifieras som allergi. In: Sonja Olin Lauritzen (Ed.), Att leva med allergi: Samhällsvetenskapliga och humanistiska perspektiv. Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allergins tillblivelse: Föräldrars berättelser om hur barnetskroppsliga besvär identifieras som allergi
2007 (Swedish)In: Att leva med allergi: Samhällsvetenskapliga och humanistiska perspektiv / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2007
National Category
Social Sciences Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21107 (URN)9789173311113 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-04-30 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2013-08-20
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2007). Discovery and Management of Child Allergy from the Parent Perspective. (Licentiate dissertation). Solna: ReproPrint
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovery and Management of Child Allergy from the Parent Perspective
2007 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Solna: ReproPrint, 2007. p. 46
Series
Karolinska Institutet Licentiat thesis
National Category
Social Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21105 (URN)
Available from: 2013-05-13 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2013-05-13Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V., Marklund, B., Ahlstedt, S., Borell, L. & Nordström, G. (2005). Allergy-like conditions and health-care contacts among children with exclusion diets at school.. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 19(1), 46-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allergy-like conditions and health-care contacts among children with exclusion diets at school.
Show others...
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  To find out whether children with exclusion diet at school had allergy-like conditions that could explain their food avoidance, the objective of this study was to describe health-care contacts and diagnostic testing among schoolchildren with exclusion diet and compare the magnitude of allergy-like conditions between those children who had vs. had not consulted health-care professionals. Telephone interviews were conducted with the parents of 230 schoolchildren, aged 6–18 years, with certificates for exclusion diets at school.

Results:  The majority of the schoolchildren (85%) had consulted health-care professionals for food-related problems, and 68% were doctor-diagnosed as having food hypersensitivity. Those who had consulted health-care professionals specifically for their food-related problems had more complex and severe problems compared with those who had not consulted health-care professionals. Breathing difficulties (27/196) and anaphylaxis (9/196) related to intake of food were reported only for those who had sought health-care professionals (n = 196). Regardless of whether the children had consulted the health-care professionals, their food-related problems were consistent with food hypersensitivity. Schoolchildren avoided food items known to be associated with food hypersensitivity such as tree nuts, fruit, egg, peanut, lactose and fish. Furthermore, 83% of the 230 children also had allergic diseases (i.e. asthma, eczema or hay fever) or were hypersensitive to other substances besides food, and 83% had at least one sibling or parent with hypersensitivity to foods or other substances.

Conclusions and implications for the school nurse:  Schoolchildren with food certificates for exclusion diets, based on parents’ statements, have food-related and allergy-like problems that may well motivate exclusion diets at school. The school nurses can rely on the parents’ information as to what foods their children should avoid, even when doctor diagnoses have not been made or health-care consultations have not been carried out.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21106 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2004.00309.x (DOI)15737165 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-04-30 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications