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Gunnarsson, N. V. (2023). “Stop acting like a child – you're immature”: The reversed ageism of practicing self-injury as adult women and the reclaiming of our bodies. Journal of Aging Studies, 67, Article ID 101187.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Stop acting like a child – you're immature”: The reversed ageism of practicing self-injury as adult women and the reclaiming of our bodies
2023 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 67, article id 101187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The practice of self-injury is considered deviant and pathological, and the stereotype of a self-injuring individual is a young, white, middle-class woman. By using an autoethnographic approach, I elucidate how four women and I, aged 35–51, with experiences of self-injury in adulthood, use, internalize, and speak through dominant discourses of self-injury. The practice of self-injury is an embodied one, and self-injury is stereotypically associated with immature, irresponsible, and emotionally unstable young women. As adult women who self-injure, we use and speak through this representation, which, to some extent, affects our self-image and identity as we are often “misrecognized” as full partners in everyday social interaction or when we represent our professions. Still, we resist the idea of self-injury as stemming from immaturity, and we work to reclaim our bodies and agency from the medicalized, ageist assumptions of the practice of self-injury. By doing this, we can also rewrite and transform the meaning of this practice. Our self-inflicted wounds or scars do not define who we are nor our level of maturity, intelligence, and attractiveness. Thus, we acknowledge that we have the right to our own bodies and what we do to that body.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Adult women, Ageism, Autoethnography, Gender, Self-injury, Social stigma, The body
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62698 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2023.101187 (DOI)001098760700001 ()38012939 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173651491 (Scopus ID)HOA;;911269 (Local ID)HOA;;911269 (Archive number)HOA;;911269 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-10-20 Created: 2023-10-20 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Golding, M. A., Batac, A. L. R., Gunnarsson, N. V., Ahlstedt, S., Middelveld, R. & Protudjer, J. L. P. (2022). The burden of food allergy on children and teens: A systematic review. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 33(3), Article ID e13743.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The burden of food allergy on children and teens: A systematic review
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2022 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 33, no 3, article id e13743Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Over the last two decades, researchers have placed increasing attention on understanding how food allergy affects the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and psychosocial well-being of children and teens. In response, a number of reviews have been published that aim at synthesizing the literature. However, many of these papers focus narrowly on HRQL or suffer from methodological limitations.

Method

The current review aims to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive overview of the burden of pediatric food allergy by synthesizing the quantitative and qualitative literature.

Results

Findings from the present review provide evidence of reduced HRQL among children and teens with food allergy, particularly older children and those with more severe manifestations of the condition. In comparison to HRQL, the link between food allergy and psychosocial functioning is less clear; however, some evidence can be cited linking food allergy to greater levels of psychological distress. Qualitative evidence suggests that the burden of pediatric food allergy largely stems from worries surrounding exposures outside of the home and the social consequences of the condition. The current review also highlights several gaps in the literature, including a paucity of longitudinal research, research focused on predictors of psychological distress among children and teens with food allergy as well as a dearth of studies comparing rates of bullying in food-allergic and non-food-allergic samples.

Conclusion

More emphasis should be placed on not only alleviating the social and psychological consequences of food allergy, but also on identifying and assisting those most acutely burdened by the condition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
bullying, burden, food allergy, food hypersensitivity, mixed methods, psychosocial functioning, quality of life
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-56007 (URN)10.1111/pai.13743 (DOI)000773304100003 ()35338731 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127268080 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;1642730 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;1642730 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;1642730 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-03-07 Created: 2022-03-07 Last updated: 2022-04-11Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. & Lönnberg, M. (2022). The “good” and the “bad” subject position in self-injury autobiographies. Qualitative Social Work, 21(5), 974-994
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The “good” and the “bad” subject position in self-injury autobiographies
2022 (English)In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 974-994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Utilizing published autobiographies, we explore how individuals who self-injure discursively construct their experiences of the self and self-injury. The authors construct their selves into two seemingly opposite subject positions, here named the "bad girl" and the "good girl." For the most part, the authors identify themselves with the "bad girl" position. Although there is a struggle to uphold normalcy in front of others, they regard evidence of the "good girl" position as fake. We demonstrate how they, to a large extent, accept the dominant discourse of self-injury as an individual and pathological problem for which they tend to blame themselves. However, they also challenge the negative subject position by separating themselves discursively from the bad "side of the self." Acts of self-injury are described as a way to cope with the negative perception of themselves and at the same time being what causes feelings of self-loathing. Thus, understanding how the psychomedical discourse affects individuals who self-injure as well as the consequences of the medicalization of self-injury are of importance. Furthermore, social workers may be in a legitime position to work with the self-representations and the social factors that may underlie an individual's need to cut or in other ways physically hurt oneself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Self-injury, firsthand accounts, construction of self, subject position, autobiographies
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54373 (URN)10.1177/14733250211043933 (DOI)000692214600001 ()2-s2.0-85114042849 (Scopus ID)HOA;;761603 (Local ID)HOA;;761603 (Archive number)HOA;;761603 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2022-12-18Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2022). The scarred body: A personal reflection of self-injury scars. Qualitative Social Work, 21(1), 37-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The scarred body: A personal reflection of self-injury scars
2022 (English)In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-injury is deemed a pathology and a deviant practice that is not socially sanctioned and culturally accepted as soothing and healing the self. The marked female body is also pathologized and perceived as deviant; hence, having self-inflicted scars may easily lead to social stigma, shame, and the need to hide the scars. In this personal reflection I explore how self-inflicted scars can have the same meaning as self-injury to control the self and act as self-expression, and how the marked female body can be a resistance to the cultural idea of femininity. I draw upon my own personal experiences of self-inflicted scars and how these scars have become intertwined with my identity. I have carved or burnt my body in different situations and from different moods in the past, but they are all with me at the present and will be with me in the future. Without the scars, I am not the person that others see me as or I see myself as. I sometimes feel that I would be nothing without my scars. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Identity, personal reflection, reflection, scars, self-injury
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-51828 (URN)10.1177/1473325021990868 (DOI)000618521200001 ()2-s2.0-85100041891 (Scopus ID)HOA;;1526423 (Local ID)HOA;;1526423 (Archive number)HOA;;1526423 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-02-08 Created: 2021-02-08 Last updated: 2022-04-08Bibliographically approved
Golding, M. A., Gunnarsson, N. V., Middelveld, R., Ahlstedt, S. & Protudjer, J. L. P. (2021). A scoping review of the caregiver burden of pediatric food allergy. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 127(5), 536
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A scoping review of the caregiver burden of pediatric food allergy
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2021 (English)In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 127, no 5, p. 536-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

While a number of papers have described the psychosocial impact of raising a child with a food allergy, recent attempts at synthesizing this literature have been narrow in focus and/or methodologically limited. Consequently, the current study aimed to synthesize both the quantitative and qualitative literature in order to achieve a better understanding of the psychosocial and financial burdens faced by families raising children with food allergy.

Data Sources

Searches were performed on PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo and CINAHL for articles related to the psychosocial and financial burden experienced by individuals caring for a child with food allergy.

Study Selections

English language, original research articles were included in the current review.

Results

A total of 53 articles were deemed eligible for review. Results from the quantitative literature revealed that parents of children with food allergy (i.e., food allergy and food protein-induced enterocolitis, proctocolitis, and enteropathy) consistently reported lower QoL relative to their comparison groups. Within-group analyses suggest that this burden is increased for parents managing multiple food allergies, severe food allergy, and comorbid allergic conditions. Thematic synthesis of the qualitative literature suggests that the psychosocial burden shouldered by parents of children with food allergy stems, in part, from the unpredictable threat of exposure as well as the practical and social burdens of managing a food allergy. In addition to psychosocial burdens, a small but growing body of literature suggests that families with food allergy also incur greater financial costs.

Conclusion

Findings suggest that pediatric food allergy imposes considerable burdens on parents both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
food allergy, caregiver burden, cost of illness, mixed-methods
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-52440 (URN)10.1016/j.anai.2021.04.034 (DOI)000710892800007 ()33971359 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85108210076 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-11 Created: 2021-05-11 Last updated: 2021-11-18Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2021). The activation and restoration of shame in an intimate relationship: A first-hand account of self-injury. Qualitative Sociology Review, XVII(2), 104-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The activation and restoration of shame in an intimate relationship: A first-hand account of self-injury
2021 (English)In: Qualitative Sociology Review, ISSN 1733-8077, E-ISSN 1733-8077, Vol. XVII, no 2, p. 104-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is grounded in a first-hand account of my own experiences with self-injury and shame. By using my personal diary entries as support for this account and a sociological framework of shame, I explore the process of shame and shame reactions in an intimate relationship. I illustrate how shame was activated by my internalized critical other, how the shame cycle de-stabilized my relationship, and, finally, how shame was restored through the other’s validation and acceptance, or how it led to more shame managed by self-injury. However, this account is not simply about self-analysis, or a need to indulge in my pain; rather, it is an inner dialogue that rests on the commitment to develop a richer understanding of the personal and interpersonal experiences of self-injury and shame. Today, I finally understand how shame works and this has helped me to not get caught up in my emotions. So, although shame may take a hold of me at times, I am no longer, like before, controlled by my shame. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lodz University Press, 2021
Keywords
Self-Injury; Shame; Social Bonds; Critical Other; First-Person Account
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-52339 (URN)10.18778/1733-8077.17.2.06 (DOI)2-s2.0-85108239923 (Scopus ID)POA;;52339 (Local ID)POA;;52339 (Archive number)POA;;52339 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-04-29 Created: 2021-04-29 Last updated: 2021-07-14Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, N. V. (2021). The Self-perpetuating Cycle of Shame and Self-injury. Humanity and Society, 45(3), 313-333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Self-perpetuating Cycle of Shame and Self-injury
2021 (English)In: Humanity and Society, ISSN 0160-5976, E-ISSN 2372-9708, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although previous studies have considered shame to be a significant emotion in making sense of self-injury, the connection is still not fully understood. Drawing on sociological ideas on shame, this communication contributes to a theoretical understanding of actions of self-injury by demonstrating how shame operates and unfolds in social interaction. It argues for how shame and self-injury may reproduce and amplify each other, hence turning into a self-perpetuating cycle of shame and self-injury. It shows how shame is triggered in social interaction, how shame leads to self-injury, and how self-injury may turn into more shame. Self-injury is used to fend off shame by upholding social and cultural commitments and maintaining social bonds with others. However, self-injury may also threaten social order and social bonds and, consequently, trigger more shame. The most important reason that self-injury does not fully work as emotion work, and internalized social control, lies in the interactive cycle of shame, that is, you feel shame and cut, you cut again and are (a)shamed, you are shamed and cut, and so on. It is proposed that people who self-injure do not necessarily lack the ability to self-soothe or regulate emotions or that they suffer from a clinical psychopathology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
self-injury, shame, social interaction, the role taking process, social bonds
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47890 (URN)10.1177/0160597620904475 (DOI)HOA;;1396455 (Local ID)HOA;;1396455 (Archive number)HOA;;1396455 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2024-01-19Bibliographically approved
Middelveld, R., Gunnarsson, N. V., Ahlstedt, S. & Protudjer, J. L. (2020). Associations between food allergy and perceived life status [Letter to the editor]. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 125(6), P703-P705.E1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between food allergy and perceived life status
2020 (English)In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 125, no 6, p. P703-P705.E1Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50328 (URN)10.1016/j.anai.2020.07.021 (DOI)000600963600019 ()32717299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089193185 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Available from: 2020-08-20 Created: 2020-08-20 Last updated: 2021-12-13Bibliographically approved
Middelveld, R., Gunnarsson, N. V., Ahlstedt, S. & Protudjer, J. L. (2020). Establishing perceived life status of children with food allergy, and their families by use of a visual analogue scale. Paper presented at European-Academy-of-Allergology-and-Clinical-Immunology Digital Congress (EAACI), JUN 06-08, 2020, London, ENGLAND. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 75(Supplement 109), 511-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishing perceived life status of children with food allergy, and their families by use of a visual analogue scale
2020 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 75, no Supplement 109, p. 511-511Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50763 (URN)000566847301404 ()
Conference
European-Academy-of-Allergology-and-Clinical-Immunology Digital Congress (EAACI), JUN 06-08, 2020, London, ENGLAND
Available from: 2020-10-02 Created: 2020-10-02 Last updated: 2021-12-13Bibliographically approved
Lindmark, U., Bülow, P. H., Mårtensson, J., Rönning, H., Ahlstrand, I., Broström, A., . . . Sandgren, A. (2019). The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review. Nursing Open, 6(3), 664-675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review
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2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and to explore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health and social work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between 2003–2013.

Design

An integrative literature review.

Methods

PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Index and AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles including the concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articles are in accordance to Meleis' typologies of transition by experts in each discipline. Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Results

Meleis' four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except development in oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored, whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
literature review, nursing theory, occupational therapy, oral health, social welfare, social work, theory–practice gap, transition
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43307 (URN)10.1002/nop2.249 (DOI)000476917700002 ()31367388 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069778425 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2021-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8948-1055

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