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Johansson, Sverker
Publications (10 of 86) Show all publications
Johansson, S. (2014). How can a social theory of language evolution be grounded in evidence?. In: Daniel Dor, Chris Knight, Jeremy Lewis (Ed.), The Social Origins of Language: (pp. 56-65). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can a social theory of language evolution be grounded in evidence?
2014 (English)In: The Social Origins of Language / [ed] Daniel Dor, Chris Knight, Jeremy Lewis, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 56-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014
Series
Oxford studies in the evolution of language ; 19
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20277 (URN)9780199665334 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2013). Biolinguistics or Physicolinguistics? Is The Third Factor Helpful Or Harmful In Explaining Language?. Biolinguistics, 7, 249-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biolinguistics or Physicolinguistics? Is The Third Factor Helpful Or Harmful In Explaining Language?
2013 (English)In: Biolinguistics, ISSN 1450-3417, Vol. 7, p. 249-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Noam Chomsky (2005) proposed that a ‘third factor’, consisting of general principles and natural laws, may explain core properties of language in a principled manner, minimizing the need for either genetic endowment or experience. But the focus on third-factor patterns in much recent bio-linguistic work is misguided for several reasons: First, ‘the’ third factor is a vague and disparate collection of unrelated components, useless as an analytical tool. Second, the vagueness of the third factor, together with the desire for principled explanations, too often leads to sweeping claims, such as syntax “coming for free, directly from physics”, that are unwarranted without a case-by-case causal analysis. Third, attention is diverted away from a proper causal analysis of language as a biological feature. The point with biolinguistics is to acknowledge the language faculty as a biological feature. The best way forward towards an understanding of language is to take the biology connection seriously, instead of dabbling with physics.

Keyword
Third factor; natural law; physics; Fibonacci; causal analysis
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22990 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2013). I-language is not what evolved biologically, and E-language is not what evolved culturally.. Paper presented at 19th Congrès International des Linguistes, August 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I-language is not what evolved biologically, and E-language is not what evolved culturally.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20281 (URN)
Conference
19th Congrès International des Linguistes, August 2013
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Johansson, S. (2013). Neanderthals between Man and Beast: A Comment on the Comments of Barceló-Coblijn & Benítez-Burraco (2013). Biolinguistics, 7, 217-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neanderthals between Man and Beast: A Comment on the Comments of Barceló-Coblijn & Benítez-Burraco (2013)
2013 (English)In: Biolinguistics, ISSN 1450-3417, Vol. 7, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22995 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2013). The Talking Neanderthals: What do Fossils, Genetics and Archeology Say?. Biolinguistics, 7, 035-074
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Talking Neanderthals: What do Fossils, Genetics and Archeology Say?
2013 (English)In: Biolinguistics, ISSN 1450-3417, Vol. 7, p. 035-074Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Did Neanderthals have language? This issue has been debated back and forth for decades, without resolution. But in recent years new evidence has become available. New fossils and archeological finds cast light on relevant Neanderthal anatomy and behavior. New DNA evidence, both fossil and modern, provides clues both to the relationship between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens, and to the genetics of language. In this paper, I review and evaluate the available evidence. My conclusion is that the preponderance of the evidence supports the presence of some form of language in Neanderthals.

National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20279 (URN)
Available from: 2013-03-13 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2013). What, if anything, can Chomsky's Third Factor contribute to the understanding of language?. Paper presented at 19th Congrès International des Linguistes, August 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What, if anything, can Chomsky's Third Factor contribute to the understanding of language?
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20282 (URN)
Conference
19th Congrès International des Linguistes, August 2013
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Östklint, O., Johansson, S. & Anderberg, E. (2012). Fysik för lärare (1ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fysik för lärare
2012 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012. p. 311 Edition: 1
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19723 (URN)97889144076652 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-10-31 Created: 2012-10-31 Last updated: 2015-07-03Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2012). The case for Neanderthal language. How strong is it?. In: Thomas C Scott-Phillips, Mónica Tamariz, Erica A Cartmill & James R Hurford (Ed.), The evolution of language : proceedings of the 9th international conference (EVOLANG9), Kyoto, Japan, 13 - 16 March 2012: . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on the Evolution of Language, March 13-16 2012, Kyoto, Japan (pp. 173-180). Hackensack, N.J.: World Scientific
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The case for Neanderthal language. How strong is it?
2012 (English)In: The evolution of language : proceedings of the 9th international conference (EVOLANG9), Kyoto, Japan, 13 - 16 March 2012 / [ed] Thomas C Scott-Phillips, Mónica Tamariz, Erica A Cartmill & James R Hurford, Hackensack, N.J.: World Scientific, 2012, p. 173-180Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Did Neanderthals have language? This issue has been debated back and forth for decades,without resolution. But in recent years new evidence has become available. New fossils andarchaeological finds cast light on relevant Neanderthal anatomy and behaviour. New DNA evidence,both fossil and modern, provides clues both to the relationship between Neanderthals andHomo sapiens, and to the genetics of language. In this paper, I review and evaluate the availableevidence. My conclusion is that the preponderance of the evidence supports the presenceof some form of language in Neanderthals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hackensack, N.J.: World Scientific, 2012
Keyword
language evolution, neanderthals
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16721 (URN)9789814401494 (ISBN)
Conference
9th International Conference on the Evolution of Language, March 13-16 2012, Kyoto, Japan
Available from: 2011-11-15 Created: 2011-11-15 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2012). The Third Factor does not come for free. In: : . Paper presented at Presented at Language, Culture & Mind V, June 27-29, 2012, Lisbon, Portugal.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Third Factor does not come for free
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20278 (URN)
Conference
Presented at Language, Culture & Mind V, June 27-29, 2012, Lisbon, Portugal
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, S. (2011). Constraining the time when language evolved. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, 10, 45-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraining the time when language evolved
2011 (English)In: Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, ISSN 1841-2394, Vol. 10, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The precise timing of the emergence of language in human prehistory cannot be resolved. But the available evidence is sufficient to constrain it to some degree. This is a review and synthesis of the available evidence, leading to the conclusion that the time when speech in some form became important for our ancestors can be constrained to be not less than 400,000 years ago, thus excluding several popular theories involving a late transition to speech.

Keyword
language evolution, emergence of language, human prehistory, speech, ancestors
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16617 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-04 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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