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Allwood, Jens
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Allwood, J., Regmi, B. N. & Dhakhwa, S. (2013). An activity based spoken language corpus of Lohorung. In: : . Paper presented at 2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An activity based spoken language corpus of Lohorung
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social activities are an important part of the context of language use and provide many keys to understanding linguistic and communicative features. Such features can be well understood only if they are observed in their natural setting which to some extent is possible using a multimodal corpus as linguistic communication itself is multimodal. In order to study naturalistic multimodal communication using a corpus, the corpus should contain a combination of recordings, documentation, and transcription of multimodal communication from different social activities in naturalistic settings, preserving unedited conversation. This paper presents a brief account of the principles, methodology, current status, and further issues, based on an incrementally growing and multimodal activity based spoken language corpus of Lohorung.

National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24921 (URN)10.1109/ICSDA.2013.6709895 (DOI)2-s2.0-84894147186 (Scopus ID)978-147992378-6 (ISBN)
Conference
2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Salomonson, N., Allwood, J., Lind, M. & Alm, H. (2013). Comparing Human-to-Human and Human-to-AEA Communication in Service Encounters. Journal of Business Communication, 50(1), 87-116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing Human-to-Human and Human-to-AEA Communication in Service Encounters
2013 (English)In: Journal of Business Communication, ISSN 0021-9436, E-ISSN 1552-4582, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 87-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of companies are introducing artificial agents as self-service tools on their websites, often motivated by the need to provide cost-efficient interaction solutions. These agents are designed to help customers and clients to conduct their business on the website. Their role on commercial websites is often to act as online sales/shopping assistants with the hope of replacing some of the interactions between customers and sales staff, thus supplementing or replacing human-to-human communication. However, research on artificial agents and comparisons with human-to-human communication, in particular, is still scarce. The purpose of this article is to explore the similarities and differences in communication between an artificial agent and customers compared with face-to-face communication between human service providers and customers. The method employed is a qualitative comparison of face-to-face human service provision in a travel agency setting and logs of interactions between customers and an artificial agent on an airline company website. The analysis is based on the theory of "activity-based communication analysis" and makes use of a framework of specific communication features provided by this theory. The article demonstrates a number of deficiencies in communication between artificial embodied agents and humans, suggesting that artificial embodied agents still lack many of the desirable communicative aspects of human-to-human service encounters. ©2013 by the Association for Business Communication.

Keywords
activity-based communication analysis; artificial embodied agents; computer-mediated communication; interpersonal communication; service encounters
National Category
Business Administration Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24922 (URN)10.1177/0021943612465180 (DOI)2-s2.0-84870404069 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Regmi, B. N. & Allwood, J. (2013). Own communication management in Nepali. In: : . Paper presented at 2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Own communication management in Nepali
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper studies multimodality in Own Communication Management (OCM) focusing on how linguistic communication involves gestures in order to manage communication. OCM is a basic function in face-to-face communication and concerns how a speaker, on the basis of feedback needs to be able to plan his or her contributions and to modify earlier content or expressions. Thus OCM has two major functions namely ’choice’ and ’change’ both of which are realized with OCM related expressions and operations. This paper reports on studies of the expressions, and operations in both of the OCM functions and their distribution patterns. It also reports on interaction between OCM expressions, and between OCM operation and other communicative functions (Interactive Communication Management (ICM) and main message (MM)). Some of the main findings from the study are that about 66% of all OCM expressions involve gestures, and that the distribution of choice and change function of OCM is about 90% to 10%. The OCM expressions have multiple functions and interact with other communicative functions including ICM and the main message resulting in a complex system. ©2013 IEEE.

National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24920 (URN)10.1109/ICSDA.2013.6709896 (DOI)2-s2.0-84894151668 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Allwood, J., Regmi, B. N., Dhakhwa, S. & Uranw, R. K. (2012). An activity based spoken language corpus of Nepali. In: 2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013: . Paper presented at 2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013; Gurgaon; India; 25 November 2013 through 27 November 2013 (pp. 24-29).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An activity based spoken language corpus of Nepali
2012 (English)In: 2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013, 2012, p. 24-29Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Language is used for communication and communication facilitates social activities. If we want to capture this, linguistic investigation has to be carried out within a wider context. Examination of linguistic communication in a wider context shows that it is multimodal. In order to study naturalistic multimodal communication using a corpus, the corpus should contain a combination of recordings, documentation, and transcription of multimodal communication from different social activities in naturalistic settings, preserving unedited conversation. This paper presents a brief account of the principles, methodology, current status, and preliminary findings, based on an incrementally growing and multimodal activity based spoken language corpus of Nepali. ©2012 IEEE.

Keywords
Activity-based; Multi-modal; Nepali language; NSC; Spoken languages, Communication; Linguistics, Speech recognition
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24924 (URN)10.1109/ICSDA.2012.6422472 (DOI)2-s2.0-84874262171 (Scopus ID)978-147992378-6 (ISBN)
Conference
2013 International Conference Oriental COCOSDA Held Jointly with 2013 Conference on Asian Spoken Language Research and Evaluation, O-COCOSDA/CASLRE 2013; Gurgaon; India; 25 November 2013 through 27 November 2013
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Allwood, J. (2012). Cognition, communication, and readiness for language. Pragmatics & Cognition, 20(2), 334-355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition, communication, and readiness for language
2012 (English)In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, E-ISSN 1569-9943, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 334-355Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This review article discusses some problems and needs for clarification that are connected with the use of the concepts culture, language, tool, and communication in Daniel Everett’s recently published book, Language: The Cultural Tool. It also discusses whether the idea of biological readiness and preparedness for language (rather than grammar) can really be disposed of as a result of Everett’s very convincing arguments against a specific genetic predisposition for the syntactic component of a grammar. Finally, it calls into question whether Everett really is true to his professed ideology of scientific ideographical pragmatism. ©2012 John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Keywords
Cognition; Communication; Comparing languages and cultures; Evolution; Readiness for language; Tool metaphor
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24926 (URN)10.1075/pc.20.2.08all (DOI)2-s2.0-84874135855 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Salomonson, N., Åberg, A. & Allwood, J. (2012). Communicative skills that support value creation: A study of B2B interactions between customers and customer service representatives. Industrial Marketing Management, 41(1), 145-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicative skills that support value creation: A study of B2B interactions between customers and customer service representatives
2012 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although interaction has been acknowledged as central in value creation there is still a lack of empirical studies on how value creation is accomplished in practice, and in particular how communicative skills support customers’ value creation. The purpose of this paper is therefore to generate a deeper understanding of how customer service representatives’ communicative skills in conversations with customers support customers’ value creation. We argue that value creating processes correspond to customers’ roles as "feelers", "thinkers" and "doers". Accordingly, value creation involves three interdependent elements, an emotional, a cognitive and a behavioral. Based on a qualitative research design, drawing on an empirical study of 80 telephone conversations between customers and customer service representatives in a business-to-business context, the paper demonstrates three communicative skills that are essential in supporting customers’ value creation: attentiveness, perceptiveness and responsiveness. The findings show how employees, by means of these communicative skills support customers’ value creation. Attentiveness supports cognitive elements of the customers’ value creating processes, whereas perceptiveness supports value creation in terms of cognitive, behavioral and emotional aspects. Finally, responsiveness supports the customer’s cognitive as well as behavioral value creation. ©2011 Elsevier Inc.

National Category
Communication Studies Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24928 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2011.11.021 (DOI)2-s2.0-84856805206 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Navarretta, C., Ahlsen, E., Allwood, J., Jokinen, K. & Paggio, P. (2012). Feedback in Nordic First-Encounters: a Comparative Study. In: Calzolari, N; Choukri, K; Declerck, T; et al. (Ed.), Lrec 2012 - Eighth International Conference On Language Resources And Evaluation: . Paper presented at 8th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC) Location: Istanbul, TURKEY Date: MAY 21-27, 2012 (pp. 2494-2499).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feedback in Nordic First-Encounters: a Comparative Study
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2012 (English)In: Lrec 2012 - Eighth International Conference On Language Resources And Evaluation / [ed] Calzolari, N; Choukri, K; Declerck, T; et al., 2012, p. 2494-2499Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper compares how feedback is expressed via speech and head movements in comparable corpora of first encounters in three Nordic languages: Danish, Finnish and Swedish. The three corpora have been collected following common guidelines, and they have been annotated according to the same scheme in the NOMCO project. The results of the comparison show that in this data the most frequent feedback-related head movement is Nod in all three languages. Two types of Nods were distinguished in all corpora: Down-nods and Up-nods; the participants from the three countries use Down- and Up-nods with different frequency. In particular, Danes use Down-nods more frequently than Finns and Swedes, while Swedes use Up-nods more frequently than Finns and Danes. Finally, Finns use more often single Nods than repeated Nods, differing from the Swedish and Danish participants. The differences in the frequency of both Down-nods and Up-nods in the Danish, Finnish and Swedish interactions are interesting given that Nordic countries are not only geographically near, but are also considered to be very similar culturally. Finally, a comparison of feedback related words in the Danish and Swedish corpora shows that Swedes and Danes use common feedback words corresponding to yes and no with similar frequency.

Keywords
comparable multimodal corpora; feedback-related head movements; multimodal annotation
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24979 (URN)978-2-9517408-7-7 (ISBN)
Conference
8th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC) Location: Istanbul, TURKEY Date: MAY 21-27, 2012
Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-13 Last updated: 2014-10-14Bibliographically approved
Allwood, J., Chindamo, M. & Ahlsen, E. (2012). On identifying conflict related stances in political debates. In: Proceedings - 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom/PASSAT 2012: . Paper presented at 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2012 and the 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2012; Amsterdam; Netherlands; 3 September 2012 through 5 September 2012 (pp. 918-925).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On identifying conflict related stances in political debates
2012 (English)In: Proceedings - 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom/PASSAT 2012, 2012, p. 918-925Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to discuss some problems in identifying stances and the features that express these stances in televised political debates where there is conflict escalation. The study is based on an analysis of video-recorded political debates in different European languages (Italian (1), German (2) and US-American English (1)) and consists of a qualitative analysis of the videos in order to understand the similarities and differences in the use of social signals for stances in conflict situations in a similar setting (televised political debate) in three western cultures. ©2012 IEEE.

Keywords
conflict; Conflict situation; European languages; Multimodal communications; Political debates; Qualitative analysis; Social signals; stance
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24925 (URN)10.1109/SocialCom-PASSAT.2012.90 (DOI)2-s2.0-84873648910 (Scopus ID)978-076954848-7 (ISBN)
Conference
2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2012 and the 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2012; Amsterdam; Netherlands; 3 September 2012 through 5 September 2012
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Dhakhwa, S. & Allwood, J. (2012). Self documentation of endangered languages. In: 2012 8th International Symposium on Chinese Spoken Language Processing, ISCSLP 2012; Hong Kong; China; 5 December 2012 through 8 December 2012: . Paper presented at 2012 8th International Symposium on Chinese Spoken Language Processing, ISCSLP 2012 (pp. 392-395).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self documentation of endangered languages
2012 (English)In: 2012 8th International Symposium on Chinese Spoken Language Processing, ISCSLP 2012; Hong Kong; China; 5 December 2012 through 8 December 2012, 2012, p. 392-395Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Several minority languages are on the verge of extinction in Nepal, especially when they don’t have a generally accepted writing system and occur in an area where Nepali (the official language) is predominantly used. Lohorung is an example, which is spoken among the Lohroung Rai communities of Sankhuwasabha, a hilly district of eastern Nepal. Older generations of Lohorung are experts in Lohorung but they have limitations in reading and writing English or Nepali. The documentation of Lohorung and other similar endangered languages is important. If the right tools and techniques are used, we believe that self documentation is one of the best ways, to document a language. We have developed an online platform which community members can use to collaboratively self document their language. The platform is a multimodal dictionary authoring and browsing tool and it has been developed with a focus on usability, ease of use and productivity. ©2012 IEEE.

Keywords
Browsing tools; crowd-sourcing; Ease-of-use; Endangered languages; Lohorung; Minority languages; Multi-modal; Official languages; Online platforms; Self documentation; Tools and techniques; Writing systems
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24927 (URN)10.1109/ISCSLP.2012.6423541 (DOI)2-s2.0-84874476785 (Scopus ID)978-146732505-9 (ISBN)
Conference
2012 8th International Symposium on Chinese Spoken Language Processing, ISCSLP 2012
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Chindamo, M., Allwood, J. & Ahlsen, E. (2012). Some suggestions for the study of stance in communication. In: Proceedings - 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom/PASSAT 2012: . Paper presented at 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2012 and the 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2012; Amsterdam; Netherlands; 3 September 2012 through 5 September 2012 (pp. 617-622).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Some suggestions for the study of stance in communication
2012 (English)In: Proceedings - 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom/PASSAT 2012, 2012, p. 617-622Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interlocutors, express not only information in the form of spoken words but also their feelings and commitments with regard to what is being said. In face-to-face communication participants interact in such a way that they react to one another’s multimodal positioning in the conversation. Often this means that they take a ’stance’. The goal of this paper is to explore the notion of stance through a review and discussion of some of the relevant literature and then relate this to research on social signal processing (SSP). The main focus of the review is on the notion of stance in linguistics, as the point of departure for exploring other fields. Consideration of the relation between gestural communication and expression of emotions will give a more complete view of how a stance is taken and upheld. ©2012 IEEE.

Keywords
affective; epistemic; Face-to-face communications; Gestural communication; Multi-modal; Multimodal communications; Point of departures; Social signal processing; Spoken words; stance, Signal processing, Communication
National Category
Communication Studies General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24923 (URN)10.1109/SocialCom-PASSAT.2012.89 (DOI)2-s2.0-84873652279 (Scopus ID)978-076954848-7 (ISBN)
Conference
2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2012 and the 2012 ASE/IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2012; Amsterdam; Netherlands; 3 September 2012 through 5 September 2012
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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