Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Arnarsson, A., Nygren, J., Nyholm, M., Torsheim, T., Augustine, L., Bjereld, Y., . . . Bendtsen, P. (2019). Cyberbullying and traditional bullying among Nordic adolescents and their impact on life satisfaction. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cyberbullying and traditional bullying among Nordic adolescents and their impact on life satisfaction
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cybervictimization in the six Nordic countries and to assess its overlap with traditional bullying. A further aim was to examine potential associations between life satisfaction, on the one hand, and traditional bullying and cyberbullying on the other.

METHODS: Analyses were based on data from the 2013⁄2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. It included 32,210 boys and girls, aged 11, 13, and 15, living in the six Nordic countries.

RESULTS: The prevalence of cyberbullying by both pictures and by messages was around 2% in all the Nordic countries except Greenland. There it was considerably higher. The prevalence of being bullied in a traditional manner varied widely by country. For boys, this type of bullying was most frequent in the youngest age group and then decreased steadily in the older age groups. Girls were on average more likely to be cyberbullied. Cyberbullying was more common among 13- and 15-year-olds than 11-year-olds. Higher family affluence was unrelated to the risk of cyberbullying. However, it was related to traditional bullying and combined forms of bullying. Compared with intact families, cybervictimization was commoner among single-parent families and stepfamilies. Adjusting for age, gender, family affluence, and family structure, those subjected to cyberbullying had lower life satisfaction than those who were not bullied.

CONCLUSIONS: We found relatively little overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, indicating that the two may be separate phenomena stemming from different mechanisms, at least in the Nordic context.

Keywords
Bullying, Nordic, adolescents, cyberbullying, family affluence, family structure, life satisfaction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43206 (URN)10.1177/1403494818817411 (DOI)30672390 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060714783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-02-27
Carney, J., Fisher, R., Augutis, M., Charlifue, S., Biering-Sørensen, F., Höfers, W., . . . Mulcahey, M. J. (2019). Development of the International Spinal Cord Injury/Dysfunction Education Basic Data Set. Spinal cord series and cases, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of the International Spinal Cord Injury/Dysfunction Education Basic Data Set
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Spinal cord series and cases, ISSN 2058-6124, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design:Consensus among international experts.

Objectives: The objective of this project was to develop the International Spinal Cord Injury/Dysfunction (SCI/D) Education Basic Data Set. Setting: International expert working group.

Methods: The published guidelines for developing the International SCI Basic Data Sets were used to develop the International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set. Existing measures and literature on education and disability were reviewed to develop a preliminary draft of the basic education data set through iterative modifications via biweekly conference calls and email communication. The draft was disseminated to the larger International Workgroup for Development of Pediatric SCI/D Basic Data Sets and then to the members of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS), American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), and relevant expert groups and interested individuals for comments. All feedback received was taken into consideration before the final data set was approved by ISCoS and ASIA.

Results: The finalized version of the International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set Version 1.0 contains 16 items divided into three domains: school setting/therapeutic services, school participation/academic success, and barriers/attitudes. Most of the variables have been adapted from established measures. This data set is intended for children and youth up to and including high school, but not for emerging adults in higher education or postsecondary vocational training or trade schools.

Conclusion: The International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set has been developed for collection of a minimal amount of highly relevant information on the education experience in children and youth with SCI/D. Further validation work is needed.

Sponsorship: This project was funded by the Rick Hansen Institute, Research Award #G2015-27 (Mulcahey, PI). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
Keywords
Health care, Neurological disorders
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46903 (URN)10.1038/s41394-019-0229-1 (DOI)31700685 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074710227 (Scopus ID)HOA HLK 2019;HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HOA HLK 2019;HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HOA HLK 2019;HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Bertills, K., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2019). Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education. Frontiers in Education, 4(74)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, no 74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
student engagement, teaching skills, physical education, disability, inclusion, participation, secondary school
National Category
Pedagogy Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45587 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2019.00074 (DOI)GOA HHJ 2019,GOA HLK 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019,GOA HLK 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019,GOA HLK 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-18 Created: 2019-08-18 Last updated: 2020-01-21Bibliographically approved
Green, D., Trejo, K., Augustine, L., Granlund, M. & Björk, E. (2019). Participatory profiles of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: With and without mental health issues. In: : . Paper presented at IAACD 2nd Triannual Meeting, Anaheim, California, September 18-21, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory profiles of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: With and without mental health issues
Show others...
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47129 (URN)
Conference
IAACD 2nd Triannual Meeting, Anaheim, California, September 18-21, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Lygnegård, F., Augustine, L., Granlund, M., Kåreholt, I. & Huus, K. (2018). Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study. Frontiers in Education, 3, 1-13, Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, p. 1-13, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though participation in everyday events is a vital part in the fulfilment of human rights, adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders often face participation restrictions in every-day activities. Few studies have investigated the predictors for participation in different contexts, over time and in relation to the same outcome variables. The objective of the current study was therefore to investigate predictors of change in participation operationalized as frequency of attendance and perceived importance in domestic life activities, peer related activities, and school activities as experienced by adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Associations with participation, both in terms of frequency and perceived importance, in domestic life, peer relations, and the school setting were investigated using six independent variables measuring experience of time and self, sex, age, stress, support from siblings, and atmosphere in family at two-time (with approximately 2 years in between). The sample consisted of adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders (n= 916). Adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders were n=154 and adolescents without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders was n= 762. Data was collected via self-reported questionnaires administered in schools. Results: Three key findings are presented. 1) more factors were associated with participation outcomes at time1 for adolescents without NDD than for adolescents with NDD, but this difference in the number of factors decreases with time; 2) few associations were related to time for both adolescents with and without NDD; and 3) patterns of predicting variables were different for adolescents with and without NDD. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the factors related to participation in and outside school differs between groups, when the impairment or disability is not considered as a predictor for participation. This study supports the need for using a multidimensional developmental and contextual perspective in addressing enhanced participation for adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39341 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2018.00028 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Maxwell, G. R., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2018). Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion. Frontiers in Education, 3, Article ID 41.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the use and validity of the International Classification of Functioning disability and health (ICF) as a common language for describing inclusive educational settings. There is a specific focus on investigating participation through the ICF as one aspect of inclusion as an improved understanding of participation as a measure of inclusion will greatly benefit children with additional support needs. In addition there will be a better understanding of the operationalization of participation, in terms of both policy and practice, and improved applications of the ICF. The study uses a narrative summary to review to analyse the findings from a selection of studies where the ICF has been used as a methodological tool in the field of education. In the 16 included studies the ICF is either used to present a new theoretical position, synthesize a new research approach or tool, or is integrated into the framework of an existing research method. Findings also show that the ICF is used in a number of different ways and that when it is used directly, variation is found in the type of information that was linked to ICF codes or categories. In conclusion further clarity on defining and measuring participation with the ICF framework is required in order to create a more consistent tool for investigating inclusive education. One way to improve the construct of participation is to take a bi-dimensional approach. It is the authors’ belief that this newer approach to modelling participation will be considered in any future revisions of the ICF/ICF-CY – a so-called ‘ICF-2’. This would thus create a more accountable classification framework that succeeds in capturing the involvement experience of the individual and in doing so achieves a more effective and useful classification framework for the field of inclusive education.

Keywords
ICF-CY, methodology, education, participation, inclusion
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40637 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2018.00041 (DOI)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Augustine, L., Lygnegård, F., Granlund, M. & Adolfsson, M. (2018). Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(19), 2293-2299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 19, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

  • Implications for rehabilitation
  • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

  • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

  • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

  • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Mental health, participation, linking rules, adolescents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35864 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1334238 (DOI)000440026500010 ()28573885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020216652 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Bertills, K., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2018). Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 33(4), 572-583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
disability, functioning, participation, physical education, Self-efficacy
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37797 (URN)10.1080/08856257.2017.1386316 (DOI)000438115400009 ()2-s2.0-85030869144 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-27 Created: 2017-10-27 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Bertills, K., Granlund, M., Dahlström, Ö. & Augustine, L. (2018). Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 23(4), 387-401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities
2018 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Teaching skills, self-efficacy, disability, participation, physical education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38906 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2018.1441394 (DOI)000430866600004 ()2-s2.0-85042385865 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Bertills, K., Granlund, M. & Augustine, L. (2018). Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE. In: : . Paper presented at AIESEP Specialist Seminar: Future Directions in PE Assessment, October 18-20, 2018, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43428 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP Specialist Seminar: Future Directions in PE Assessment, October 18-20, 2018, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4079-8902

Search in DiVA

Show all publications