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Jenkins, Anna
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Jenkins, A., Wiklund, J. & Brundin, E. (2014). Individual responses to firm failure: Appraisals, grief, and the influence of prior failure experience. Journal of Business Venturing, 29(1), 17-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual responses to firm failure: Appraisals, grief, and the influence of prior failure experience
2014 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper provides a systematic assessment of how entrepreneurs react to firmfailure. We use appraisal theory as an overarching theoretical framework andhypothesize that the more the failure experience is appraised as stressful interms of its implications for harm or loss, the greater the feelings of grief. Totest this hypothesis we developed a unique database of entrepreneurs whorecently filed for firm bankruptcy. Our results support that there is greatvariation in responses to firm failure, and we provide theoretically validexplanations to why this is the case. These findings have substantialimplications for how scholars conceive and theorize about entrepreneurialfailure.

Keywords
Firm failure, Grief; Appraisals, Psychological capital, Prior failure experience
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19685 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2012.10.006 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-24 Created: 2012-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A., Hunter, E., Hellerstedt, K. & Davidsson, P. (2014). Stigmatization of failed entrepreneurs: prevalence and solutions. In: : . Paper presented at 2014 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, 4 – 7 June, Ontario, Canada..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stigmatization of failed entrepreneurs: prevalence and solutions
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25380 (URN)IHHÖvrigtIS (Local ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Archive number)IHHÖvrigtIS (OAI)
Conference
2014 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, 4 – 7 June, Ontario, Canada.
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2015-12-22
Jenkins, A. (2012). After Firm Failure: Emotions, learning and re-entry. (Doctoral dissertation). Jönköping: Jönköping International Business School
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After Firm Failure: Emotions, learning and re-entry
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Uncertainty is inherent to the entrepreneurship process. As such, the outcomes of entrepreneurial endeavors are unknown and unknowable a priori– some will be successful and others will fail. Entrepreneurship research, however, often focuses on new ventures and the entrepreneurs who own and run them in the start-up and growth phases. As a consequence, little is known about the failure experiences of entrepreneurs.

In this dissertation I investigate how entrepreneurs interpret and respond to the failure of their firms. I focus on learning, re-entry into self-employment, and emotional recovery as important adaptive outcomes. To do this, I draw on cognitive-emotional theories of adaptation and motivation to capture the interplay between the interpretations of the failure, emotions, financial loss, coping behaviors, and adaptive outcomes. I employ a longitudinal quantitative design and survey owner-managers of firms that had recently gone bankrupt.

The results are presented in four empirical papers that each focus on a specific aspect of the failure experience. The findings highlight that there is substantial variance in how entrepreneurs interpret firm failure and this has important implications for how they respond. Specifically, I show that loss of self-esteem is one mechanism which transfers failure of the firm to a personal failure for the entrepreneur and this help can explain why firm failure is emotionally devastating from some entrepreneurs and not others. I also found that coping can play a mediating role between the emotional and financial costs of failure and adaptive outcomes, providing empirical support for studying firm failure as part of an on-going entrepreneurial process rather than a single isolated event.

Focusing on learning as an outcome from failure, I found that attributions for the failure influence what an entrepreneur learns from failure and through their influence on learning, motivation to re-enter self-employment. Hence, I tease out the relationship between learning from firm failure and motivation to apply what has been learned. Lastly, I consider how failure provides feedback information to entrepreneurs regarding their return to human capital in self-employment and that entrepreneurs factor this information into their decision making when deciding whether or not they re-enter self-employment.

Taken together the dissertation provides a comprehensive picture of the implications of firm failure for entrepreneurs. The dissertation contributes to understanding why failure can be devastating for some entrepreneurs and not others and why some entrepreneurs learn from failure experiences and apply their new knowledge while others do not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping International Business School, 2012. p. 269
Series
JIBS Dissertation Series, ISSN 1403-0470 ; 084
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19692 (URN)978-91-86345-37-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-11-23, B1014 at JIBS, University Campus Gjuterigatan 5, Jönköping, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-10-25 Last updated: 2012-11-08Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. (2012). It is not what is felt but how it is managed: The implications of coping for grief and re-entry after firm failure. Paper presented at Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It is not what is felt but how it is managed: The implications of coping for grief and re-entry after firm failure
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Using coping theory as an overarching theoretical framework, this paper investigates the effects of emotional and financial loss on re-entry into self-employment after firm failure and subsequent feelings of grief. I hypothesize that how firm failure is experienced influences the choice of coping strategies. In turn, the choice of coping strategies influences re-entry and feelings of grief. To test these hypotheses I developed a unique, longitudinal database of entrepreneurs who recently filed for firm bankruptcy. The findings largely support the hypothesized relationships. This paper shows that how entrepreneurs manage and cope with firm failure has implications for how they feel and whether they re-enter self-employment. Future research could investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial motivation and the use of adaptive coping strategies.

Keywords
firm failure, coping, emotions, re-entry, financial costs
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20035 (URN)
Conference
Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2012-12-03 Last updated: 2013-01-07Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. (2012). Managing Grief: a key to re-entry after firm failure. In: : . Paper presented at SGM report - Advances in the Psychology of Entrepreneurship, 29 June – 1 July, 2012, Sheffield, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Grief: a key to re-entry after firm failure
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20037 (URN)
Conference
SGM report - Advances in the Psychology of Entrepreneurship, 29 June – 1 July, 2012, Sheffield, UK
Available from: 2012-12-03 Created: 2012-12-03 Last updated: 2013-11-14Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A., Brundin, E. & Wiklund, J. (2010). Grief or Relief: Emotional responses to firm failure. In: Zacharakis et.al. (Ed.), Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2010: proceedings of the thirtieth annual entrepreneurship research conference. Paper presented at Babson Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Lausanne, 10-12th June.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grief or Relief: Emotional responses to firm failure
2010 (English)In: Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2010: proceedings of the thirtieth annual entrepreneurship research conference / [ed] Zacharakis et.al., 2010, p. -15Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper provides a first systematic assessment of how entrepreneurs react to firm failure. As hypothesized, we find that these reactions are complex and multifaceted, involving grief as well as relief. We use appraisal theory as an overarching theoretical framework. To test the hypotheses we develop a unique, hand collected, database of entrepreneurs who recently filed for firm bankruptcy. 310 telephone interviews were conducted (response rate 65%) directly followed by a mail questionnaire. After a three-wave mailing (i.e. two reminders) 147 valid mail questionnaires were returned (response rate 31.2%). This paper constitutes an important step in advancing empirically valid theory of emotional responses to entrepreneurial failure.

Series
Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research ; 30
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-12157 (URN)9780910897327 (ISBN)
Conference
Babson Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Lausanne, 10-12th June
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-17 Last updated: 2012-10-24Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. (2010). Who learns from firm failure and who fails again and again: Attributions, learning and motivation to re-enter. In: : . Paper presented at Advanced Seminar in Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Chamonix, France, March 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who learns from firm failure and who fails again and again: Attributions, learning and motivation to re-enter
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-12156 (URN)
Conference
Advanced Seminar in Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Chamonix, France, March 2010
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-17 Last updated: 2013-11-06Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. & Brundin, E. (2009). Anger, Guilt or Shame: A Study of Emotional Responses to Firm Failure. In: : . Paper presented at Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 3-6, 2009, Babson, Ma., USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anger, Guilt or Shame: A Study of Emotional Responses to Firm Failure
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-9011 (URN)
Conference
Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 3-6, 2009, Babson, Ma., USA
Available from: 2008-06-13 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2016-09-07Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. (2009). Who fails over and over again and who learns from firm failure?. In: : . Paper presented at Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 3-6, 2009, Babson College, Wellesley, Ma., USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who fails over and over again and who learns from firm failure?
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-12151 (URN)
Conference
Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 3-6, 2009, Babson College, Wellesley, Ma., USA
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-17 Last updated: 2013-11-06Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, A. S. & Markowska, M. (2008). The Changing Role of Different Learning Methods During The Entrepreneurship Process: A Conceptual Framework. In: Andrew Zacharakis et al. (Ed.), Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research: Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference. Paper presented at The Twenty-Eight Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 5-7, 2008, the Kenan-Flagler Business School, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Babson College
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Changing Role of Different Learning Methods During The Entrepreneurship Process: A Conceptual Framework
2008 (English)In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research: Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Andrew Zacharakis et al., Babson College , 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Babson College, 2008
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5789 (URN)9780910897297 (ISBN)
Conference
The Twenty-Eight Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, June 5-7, 2008, the Kenan-Flagler Business School, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Available from: 2008-06-13 Created: 2008-06-13 Last updated: 2015-02-05Bibliographically approved
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