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Tang, J. S. Y., Chen, N. T. M., Falkmer, M., Bӧlte, S. & Girdler, S. (2019). A systematic review and meta-analysis of social emotional computer based interventions for autistic individuals using the serious game framework. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 66, Article ID 101412.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review and meta-analysis of social emotional computer based interventions for autistic individuals using the serious game framework
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2019 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 66, article id 101412Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aim: Adopting the elements of the Serious Game framework has been hypothesised as a strategy to promote the efficacy of social emotional computer-based interventions (CBI) for autistic individuals. This systematic review aimed to review the application of Serious Game principles in current social emotional CBI targeting autistic individuals and evaluate the effect of these principles in remediating social emotional outcomes via meta-analysis.

Methods: Database searches identified 34 studies evaluating social emotional CBI with 17 controlled efficacy studies included in meta-regressions analyses. Narrative synthesis summarised the attributes of each CBI based on the five Serious Game principles; motivating storyline, goal directed learning, rewards and feedback, increasing levels of difficulty and individualisation.

Results: Based on the scores of the Serious Game assessment tool we developed, findings revealed on average a limited (45%) integration of Serious Game design principles in social emotional CBI for autistic individuals. Main findings from the meta-regressions of 17 controlled efficacy studies revealed a moderating effect of Serious Game design principles on the distant generalisation of social emotional skills and transferability of outcomes among autistic individuals. No significant moderating effects of Serious Game was found for close generalisation and maintenance outcomes.

Conclusion: Overall, findings suggest that the Serious Game design framework has utility in guiding the development of social emotional CBI which improve the social emotional skills of autistic individuals. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Autism, Innovative technology, Serious games, Social skills
National Category
Psychology Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45476 (URN)10.1016/j.rasd.2019.101412 (DOI)000480668200011 ()2-s2.0-85068220128 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Arnold, S. R. C., Foley, K.-R., Hwang, Y. I., Richdale, A. L., Uljarevic, M., Lawson, L. P., . . . Trollor, J. N. (2019). Cohort profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism. BMJ Open
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cohort profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46763 (URN);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-04
Tang, J. S., Falkmer, M., Chen, N. T., Bölte, S. & Girdler, S. (2019). Designing a Serious Game for Youth with ASD: Perspectives from End-Users and Professionals.. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 49(3), 978-995
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing a Serious Game for Youth with ASD: Perspectives from End-Users and Professionals.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 978-995Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent years have seen an emergence of social emotional computer games for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These games are heterogeneous in design with few underpinned by theoretically informed approaches to computer-based interventions. Guided by the serious game framework outlined by Whyte et al. (Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 45(12):1-12, 2014), this study aimed to identify the key motivating and learning features for serious games targeting emotion recognition skills from the perspectives of 11 youth with ASD and 11 experienced professionals. Results demonstrated that youth emphasised the motivating aspects of game design, while the professionals stressed embedding elements facilitating the generalisation of acquired skills. Both complementary and differing views provide suggestions for the application of serious game principles in a potential serious game.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent, Autism spectrum disorder, Computer, Educational game, Technology
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42023 (URN)10.1007/s10803-018-3801-9 (DOI)000459794700013 ()30377883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055981758 (Scopus ID)HLKCHLDIS (Local ID)HLKCHLDIS (Archive number)HLKCHLDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Black, M. H., Vaz, S., Parsons, R., Falkmer, T., Tang, J. S. Y., Morris, S., . . . Falkmer, M. (2019). Disembedding performance and eye gaze behavior of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 66, Article ID 101417.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disembedding performance and eye gaze behavior of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
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2019 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 66, article id 101417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Atypical visual perception in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks. Gaze behavior has provided some insights in to mechanisms underlying this purported superiority in children, however evidence is limited and requires additional investigation.

Method: The performance and gaze behavior of 27 adolescents with ASD and 27 matched typically developing (TD) peers were examined during the Figure Ground Subtest of the Test of Visual Perception Skills-third edition (TVPS-3).

Results: Compared to their TD counterparts, adolescents with ASD were no different in accuracy, however, had a longer response time. Differences in gaze behavior were also observed, characterized by adolescents with ASD spending less time viewing the incorrect and target figures, and spending a greater proportion of time viewing irrelevant areas of the stimuli compared to TD adolescents.

Conclusions: Results suggest that while altered visual perception was observed, this did not contribute to superiority in disembedding tasks in adolescents with ASD. Future research is required to elucidate conditions under which altered visual perception may contribute to behavioral superiority. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Enhanced perceptual functioning, Eye tracking, Local bias, Weak central coherence
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45475 (URN)10.1016/j.rasd.2019.101417 (DOI)000480668200008 ()2-s2.0-85068396586 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Scott, M., Milbourn, B. T., Falkmer, M., Black, M. H., Bölte, S., Halladay, A. K., . . . Girdler, S. J. (2019). Factors impacting employment for people with autism spectrum disorder: A scoping review. Autism, 23(4), 869-901
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors impacting employment for people with autism spectrum disorder: A scoping review
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2019 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 869-901Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to holistically synthesise the extent and range of literature relating to the employment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Database searches of Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Scopus, ERIC, Web of Science and EMBASE were conducted. Studies describing adults with autism spectrum disorder employed in competitive, supported or sheltered employment were included. Content analysis was used to identify the strengths and abilities in the workplace of employees with autism spectrum disorder. Finally, meaningful concepts relating to employment interventions were extracted and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Sets for autism spectrum disorder. The search identified 134 studies for inclusion with methodological quality ranging from limited to strong. Of these studies, only 36 evaluated employment interventions that were coded and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, primarily focusing on modifying autism spectrum disorder characteristics for improved job performance, with little consideration of the impact of contextual factors on work participation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Sets for autism spectrum disorder are a useful tool in holistically examining the employment literature for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. This review highlighted the key role that environmental factors play as barriers and facilitators in the employment of people with autism spectrum disorder and the critical need for interventions which target contextual factors if employment outcomes are to be improved. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
adult, intervention, strengths-based, vocational rehabilitation, work environment
National Category
Work Sciences Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41511 (URN)10.1177/1362361318787789 (DOI)000470858200007 ()30073870 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052370363 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Kuzminski, R., Netto, J., Wilson, J., Falkmer, T., Chamberlain, A. & Falkmer, M. (2019). Linking knowledge and attitudes: Determining neurotypical knowledge about and attitudes towards autism. PLoS ONE, 14(7), Article ID e0220197.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking knowledge and attitudes: Determining neurotypical knowledge about and attitudes towards autism
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, article id e0220197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

"Why are neurotypicals so pig-ignorant about autism?" an autistic person wrote on the Curtin Autism Research Group's on-line portal as a response to a call for research questions. Coproduced with an autistic researcher, knowledge about and attitudes towards autism were analysed from 1,054 completed surveys, representing the Australian neurotypical adult population. The majority, 81.5% of participants had a high level of knowledge and 81.3% of participants had a strong positive attitude towards autism. Neither age, nor education level had an impact on attitudes. However, attitudes were influenced by knowledge about 'Societal Views and Ideas'; 'What it Could be Like to Have Autism'; and the demographic variables 'Knowing and having spent time around someone with autism'; and gender (women having more positive attitudes than men). Thus, targeted interventions, geared more towards men than women, to increase knowledge about autism could further improve attitudes and increase acceptance of the autistic community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2019
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45536 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0220197 (DOI)000484977900067 ()31344074 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069963650 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019, GOA HLK 2019;HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019, GOA HLK 2019;HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019, GOA HLK 2019;HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Rogerson, J. M., Falkmer, M., Cuomo, B. M., Falkmer, T., Whitehouse, A. J., Granich, J. & Vaz, S. (2019). Parental experiences using the Therapy Outcomes by You (TOBY) application to deliver early intervention to their child with autism. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 22(4), 219-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental experiences using the Therapy Outcomes by You (TOBY) application to deliver early intervention to their child with autism
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSEAs computer-based interventions become commonplace for parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, this study sought to understand the experience of using a parent-delivered supplementary early intervention therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder grounded in a variety of behavioral, sensory, developmental, and relationship-based approaches and delivered via a tablet device.

METHODSParental experiences using the 'Therapy Outcomes by You' (TOBY) application were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 parents.

RESULTSParents reported TOBY facilitated parent-child engagement, provided ideas for therapeutic activities, created feelings of empowerment, and positively impacted their child's development. Barriers to use included preparation time, execution of the intervention, and individual strengths and weaknesses of their child.

CONCLUSIONThe overall parental experience of TOBY was positive when use of the application aligned with parental proficiency, opportunities for use, and importantly, the needs of the child.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2019
Keywords
App; iPad; intervention; technology; treatment
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38909 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2018.1440259 (DOI)000463811300001 ()29485349 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042914082 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved
Black, M. H., Mahdi, S., Milbourn, B., Thompson, C., D'Angelo, A., Ström, E., . . . Bölte, S. (2019). Perspectives of Key Stakeholders on Employment of Autistic Adults across the United States, Australia and Sweden. Autism Research, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives of Key Stakeholders on Employment of Autistic Adults across the United States, Australia and Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Despite efforts to improve employment outcomes for autistic individuals, internationally their employment rates remain low. There is a need to better understand the factors influencing successful employment for autistic adults in the labor market from the perspectives of multiple keystakeholders. This study represents the second in a series of papers conducted as part of an International Society for Autism Research policy brief aimed at improving employment outcomes for autistic individuals. A community consultation methodology using focus groups, forums, and interviews was applied with autistic individuals (n = 19), family members (n = 18), service providers (n = 21), employers (n = 11), researchers (n = 5), and advocacy group representatives (n = 5) in Australia, Sweden, and the United States, aiming to identify the factors perceived to determine gaining and maintaining employment for autistic individuals. Directed content analysis, guided by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), was conducted to investigate the key factors influencing employment outcomes for autistic individuals. Meaningful verbal concepts, or units of text with common themes, were also derived from the qualitative data and then linked and compared to the ICF Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Core-sets. Across countries, activity and participation and environmental factor categories of the ICF were the most associated with employment outcomes. Results suggest that removal of environmental barriers and enhancing environmental facilitators may assist to remediate ASD-related difficulties in the workplace.

LAY SUMMARY: This study sought to understand the perspectives of autistic individuals and key stakeholders on factors influencing if autistic adults get and keep jobs. Across Australia, Sweden, and the UnitedStates, focus groups and interviews were conducted to understand international perspectives on what helps and hinders getting and keeping a job for autistic individuals. The environment, including supports, relationships, attitudes, and services, were perceived to be the most important for workplace success. Intervention targeting barriers and facilitators in the workplace environment may support autistic adults to be successful in the labor market.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
ICF; autism; cross-cultural; employment
National Category
Other Health Sciences Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-44344 (URN)10.1002/aur.2167 (DOI)000474180800001 ()31276308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068532718 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-09-06
Dreaver, J., Thompson, C., Girdler, S., Adolfsson, M., Black, M. H. & Falkmer, M. (2019). Success Factors Enabling Employment for Adults on the Autism Spectrum from Employers' Perspective. Journal of autism and developmental disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Success Factors Enabling Employment for Adults on the Autism Spectrum from Employers' Perspective
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2019 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Employment outcomes for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are poor and there is limited understanding on how best to support individuals with ASD in the workplace. Stakeholders involved in the employment of adults with ASD, including employers and employment service providers have unique insights into the factors influencing employment for this population. Organisational and individual factors facilitating successful employment for adults with ASD across Australia and Sweden were explored, including the supports and strategies underpinning employment success from an employers' perspective. Three themes including Knowledge and Understanding of ASD, Work Environment and Job Match emerged, suggesting that a holistic approach was key to supporting success, with employer knowledge and understanding of ASD underpinning their ability to facilitate employment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Autism, Competitive employment, Employment outcomes, Vocational support
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43360 (URN)10.1007/s10803-019-03923-3 (DOI)30771130 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061587562 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-21
Evans, K. L., Millsteed, J., Richmond, J. E., Falkmer, M., Falkmer, T. & Girdler, S. J. (2019). The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 26(3), 184-193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Multigenerational care, mother, parental caregiver, working women, work-life balance
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39426 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2018.1449888 (DOI)000463112800003 ()29540096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044089240 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS;HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7275-3472

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