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Henricson, Maria
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Henricson, M., Fridlund, B., Mårtensson, J. & Hedberg, B. (2018). The validation of the Supervision of Thesis Questionnaire (STQ). Nurse Education Today, 65, 11-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The validation of the Supervision of Thesis Questionnaire (STQ)
2018 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 65, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The supervision process is characterized by differences between the supervisors’ and the students’ expectations before the start of writing a bachelor thesis as well as after its completion. A review of the literature did not reveal any scientifically tested questionnaire for evaluating nursing students’ expectations of the supervision process when writing a bachelor thesis.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of a questionnaire for measuring nursing students’ expectations of the bachelor thesis supervision process.

Design & Methods: The study had a developmental and methodological design carried out in four steps including construct validity and internal consistency reliability statistical procedures: construction of the items, assessment of face validity, data collection and data analysis.

Settings & Participants: This study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden, where students on the “Nursing student thesis, 15 ECTS” course were consecutively selected for participation. Of the 512 questionnaires distributed, 327 were returned, a response rate of 64%.

Results: Five factors with a total variance of 74% and good communalities, ≥0.64, were extracted from the 10-item STQ. The internal consistency of the 10 items was 0.68. The five factors were labelled: The nature of the supervision process, The supervisor's role as a coach, The students’ progression to self-support, The interaction between students and supervisor and supervisor competence.

Conclusions: A didactic, useful and secure questionnaire measuring nursing students’ expectations of the bachelor thesis supervision process based on three main forms of supervision was created.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keyword
Bachelor thesis, Construct validity, Expectations, Internal consistency, Questionnaire, Supervision, adult, article, data analysis, expectation, face validity, female, human, human experiment, male, nursing student, Sweden, validation process
National Category
Nursing Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38984 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2018.02.010 (DOI)XYZ ()29522961 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042876027 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Davoodi, A., Johansson, P., Henricson, M. & Aries, M. (2017). A Conceptual Framework for Integration of Evidence-Based Design with Lighting Simulation Tools. Buildings, 7(4), Article ID 82.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Conceptual Framework for Integration of Evidence-Based Design with Lighting Simulation Tools
2017 (English)In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 82Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of lighting simulation tools has been growing over the past years which has improved lighting analysis. While computer simulations have proven to be a viable tool for analyzing lighting in physical environments, they have difficulty in assessing the effects of light on occupant’s perception. Evidence-based design (EBD) is a design method that is gaining traction in building design due to its strength in providing means to assess the effects of built environments on humans. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for integrating EBD with lighting simulation tools. Based on a literature review, it was investigated how EBD and lighting simulation can be combined to provide a holistic lighting performance evaluation method. The results show that they can mutually benefit from each other. EBD makes it possible to evaluate and/or improve performance metrics by utilizing user feedback. On the other hand, performance metrics can be used for a better description of evidence, and to analyze the effects of lighting with more details. The results also show that EBD can be used to evaluate light simulations to better understand when and how they should be performed. A framework is presented for integration of lighting simulation and EBD

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2017
Keyword
Daylighting, evidence-based design (EBD), building performance simulation (BPS), performance-based design (PBD), computational modelling, lighting simulation tools, human-centric lighting design, post-occupancy evaluation (POE)
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37558 (URN)10.3390/buildings7040082 (DOI)000419187100001 ()2-s2.0-85030649049 (Scopus ID)
Note

Special Issue: Building Design and Daylighting Performance

Available from: 2017-10-05 Created: 2017-10-05 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Henricson, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2016). Are children as relatives our responsibility? How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 33-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are children as relatives our responsibility? How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to elucidate how nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives to a parent with a serious physical illness.

Method: A qualitative explorative design with focus group interviews was used. In total, 22 nurses working at one neurological, one haematological and two oncological wards were interviewed. The transcripts from the interviews were analysed in steps in accordance with inductive qualitative content analysis.

Results: This study revealed six variations in how nurses perceived their role in the encounter with child relatives, ranging from being convinced that it is not their responsibility to being aware of the children's situation and working systematically to support them.

Conclusion: Nurses should consider whether their patients have children who might be affected by their parent's illness. The nurses' self-confidence when meeting these children must be increased by education in order to strengthen their professional role. Furthermore, guidelines on how to encounter child relatives are required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keyword
Children as relatives; Nursing; Parents; Qualitative research; Support
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32061 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.09.005 (DOI)000389172500005 ()27865250 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988632759 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-26 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
Haraldsson, L., Christensson, L., Conlon, L. & Henricson, M. (2015). The experiences of ICU patients during follow-up sessions: A qualitative study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 31(4), 223-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The experiences of ICU patients during follow-up sessions: A qualitative study
2015 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Evidence supports the recommendation for follow-up session(s) for patients after discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of these follow-up sessions is to allow patients to express and discuss their experiences and problems following their time in an ICU. To optimise the knowledge gained from the follow-up session experience, it is necessary to describe how patients experience these sessions. The aim of this study was to describe how ICU-patients, experience a follow-up session.

Design/setting

This study adopted a qualitative design utilising semi-structured interviews, and which examined the experiences of seven men and five women. Qualitative content analysis was utilised.

Findings

The participants stated that the information gained from these sessions, which had previously seemed unclear to some of them, was, on the whole, now clarified and confirmed. A discernible difference was found between participants who were cared for on a general ward and those who were cared for on a rehabilitation ward and also were offered a meeting with a counsellor, following discharge their from the ICU. The findings also indicated that participants who were not offered psychosocial support showed a greater need for a follow-up session.

Conclusion

This study has highlighted the need for increasing collaboration between intensive care staff and staff in other units to provide support to this patient group in order to reduce their suffering post intensive care experience.

Keyword
content analysis; Follow-up; Intensive care; Memories
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26398 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2015.01.002 (DOI)000361146200005 ()25724102 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939256055 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hagiwara, M., Sjöqvist, B.-A., Lundberg, L., Suserud, B.-O., Henricson, M. & Jonsson, A. (2013). Decision support system in prehospital care: a randomized controlled simulation study. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 31(1), 145-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision support system in prehospital care: a randomized controlled simulation study
Show others...
2013 (English)In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 145-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Prehospital emergency medicine is a challenging discipline characterized by a high level of acuity, a lack of clinical information and a wide range of clinical conditions. These factors contribute to the fact that prehospital emergency medicine is a high-risk discipline in terms of medical errors. Prehospital use of Computerized Decision Support System (CDSS) may be a way to increase patient safety but very few studies evaluate the effect in prehospital care. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a CDSS.

Methods: In this non-blind block randomized, controlled trial, 60 ambulance nurses participated, randomized into 2 groups. To compensate for an expected learning effect the groups was further divided in two groups, one started with case A and the other group started with case B. The intervention group had access to and treated the two simulated patient cases with the aid of a CDSS. The control group treated the same cases with the aid of a regional guideline in paper format. The performance that was measured was compliance with regional prehospital guidelines and On Scene Time (OST).

Results: There was no significant difference in the two group's characteristics. The intervention group had a higher compliance in the both cases, 80% vs. 60% (p < 0.001) but the control group was complete the cases in the half of the time compare to the intervention group (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: The results indicate that this CDSS increases the ambulance nurses' compliance with regional prehospital guidelines but at the expense of an increase in OST.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17142 (URN)10.1016/j.ajem.2012.06.030 (DOI)000312954600022 ()23000323 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84870905830 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-01-15 Created: 2012-01-15 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Hagiwara, M. A., Suserud, B.-O., Jonsson, A. & Henricson, M. (2013). Exclusion of context knowledge in the development of prehospital guidelines: results produced by realistic evaluation. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 21(46)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exclusion of context knowledge in the development of prehospital guidelines: results produced by realistic evaluation
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Prehospital work is accomplished using guidelines and protocols, but there is evidence suggesting that compliance with guidelines is sometimes low in the prehospital setting. The reason for the poor compliance is not known. The objective of this study was to describe how guidelines and protocols are used in the prehospital context.

Methods

This was a single-case study with realistic evaluation as a methodological framework. The study took place in an ambulance organization in Sweden. The data collection was divided into four phases, where phase one consisted of a literature screening and selection of a theoretical framework. In phase two, semi-structured interviews with the ambulance organization's stakeholders, responsible for the development and implementation of guidelines, were performed. The third phase, observations, comprised 30 participants from both a rural and an urban ambulance station. In the last phase, two focus group interviews were performed. A template analysis style of documents, interviews and observation protocols was used.

Results

The development of guidelines took place using an informal consensus approach, where no party from the end users was represented. The development process resulted in guidelines with an insufficiently adapted format for the prehospital context. At local level, there was a conscious implementation strategy with lectures and manikin simulation. The physical format of the guidelines was the main obstacle to explicit use. Due to the format, the ambulance personnel feel they have to learn the content of the guidelines by heart. Explicit use of the guidelines in the assessment of patients was uncommon. Many ambulance personnel developed homemade guidelines in both electronic and paper format. The ambulance personnel in the study generally took a positive view of working with guidelines and protocols and they regarded them as indispensable in prehospital care, but an improved format was requested by both representatives of the organization and the ambulance personnel.

Conclusions

The personnel take a positive view of the use of guidelines and protocols in prehospital work. The main obstacle to the use of guidelines and protocols in this organization is the format, due to the exclusion of context knowledge in the development process.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19950 (URN)10.1186/1757-7241-21-46 (DOI)000321211200001 ()23799944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84879729400 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-11-29 Created: 2012-11-29 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Tingsvik, C., Bexell, E., Andersson, A.-C. & Henricson, M. (2013). Meeting the challenge: ICU-nurses' experiences of lightly sedated patients. Australian Critical Care, 26(3), 124-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the challenge: ICU-nurses' experiences of lightly sedated patients
2013 (English)In: Australian Critical Care, ISSN 1036-7314, E-ISSN 1878-1721, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 124-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Sedation of intensive care patients is necessary for comfort and to implement appropriate treatment. The trend of sedation has gone from deep to light sedation. The topic is of interest to intensive care nursing because patients are generally more awake, which requires a different clinical approach than caring for deeply sedated patients.

Purpose

The aim of this study was to describe intensive care unit (ICU) nurses experiences of caring for patients who are lightly sedated during mechanical ventilation.

Methods

A qualitative approach was used. Semi-structured interviews with nine intensive care nurses were conducted. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis, resulting in the formulation of one main category and six sub-categories.

Findings

The nurses’ experience of lightly sedated patients was described as a challenge requiring knowledge and experience. The ability to communicate with the lightly sedated patient is perceived as important for ICU nurses. Individualised nursing care respecting the patients’ integrity, involvement and participation are goals in intensive care, but might be easier to achieve when the patients are lightly sedated.

Conclusion

The results reinforce the importance of communication in nursing care. It is difficult however to create an inter-personal relationship, encourage patient involvement, and maintain communication with deeply sedated patients. When patients are lightly sedated, the nurses are able to communicate, establish a relationship and provide individualised care. This is a challenge requiring expertise and patience from the nurses. Accomplishing this increases the nurses satisfaction with their care. The positive outcome for the patients is that their experience of their stay in the ICU might become less traumatic.

Keyword
Light sedation, Mechanical ventilation, Nursing, Content analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17141 (URN)10.1016/j.aucc.2012.12.005 (DOI)000324821600006 ()23369717 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84883464992 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-01-15 Created: 2012-01-15 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Hamlin, M., Jemsson, M., Rahm, A.-S. & Henricson, M. (2013). Patienters upplevelse av delaktighet i sin självdialys: en intervjustudie. Vård i Norden, 33(4), 14-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patienters upplevelse av delaktighet i sin självdialys: en intervjustudie
2013 (Swedish)In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To suffer from kidney failure requiring dialysis is a major setback on the patient’s life situation. The trend in dialysis care is that the patients should be increasingly involved in their own dialysis treatment. The aim of this study was to illustrate the patients’ experiences of participation in their own dialysis treatment. A qualitative approach was chosen and the study consists of nine narrative interviews with patients in self-care dialysis who had hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis at two different hospitals. The results are categorized into the areas of safety and freedom. In order to feel safe the patients must have good knowledge of their disease and dialysis treatment. Patients experience freedom when they participate in their own dialysis treatment and may manage their dialysis schedule. The result also shows that the patients perceive themselves to be healthier when they are able to perform their own dialysis. The major challenge for today’s dialysis care is to involve the patients more in their own treatment and to offer them greater flexibility.

Keyword
freedom, hemodialysis, self-care dialysis, participation, peritoneal dialysis, security
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19954 (URN)
Available from: 2012-11-29 Created: 2012-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Milton da Silva, J. & Henricson, M. (2013). Promotion of hope in patients care for in an intensive care unit in Indonesia. Vård i Norden, 33(1), 4-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promotion of hope in patients care for in an intensive care unit in Indonesia
2013 (English)In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim and objective: The aim was to describe the nurses’ perception about how to promote hope in critically ill patients, cared for in intensive care units in Indonesia.

Background: The concept of hope and hopelessness has been in focused in nursing from various orientations as a subjective phenomenon in relation to illness experiences. There is a lack of studies examining patterns of how nurses promote hope in critically ill patients in in tensivecare.

Design and Method: Five specialized intensive care nurses from two different intensive care units were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to a qualitative content analysis.

Results: The patient’s hope is something personal and depends on different factors. These factors can either be a supporting system or an inhibiting factor to the nurse’s illumination of hope. Meaning, if something is very important for the patient (i.e. the family), there can be a radical difference if that person is present and supporting, present and not supporting or even not present at all.

Conclusion: By using interventions including information, communication and religion, the nurses may release hope within the patient. This hope can be cultural and socially bound but it does not avoid the facts of the promotion that can be tailored by the nurses to individual circumstances and possibly used in other wards but also in different countries.

Keyword
hope, intensive care, Indonesia, nurses, content analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17140 (URN)
Available from: 2012-01-15 Created: 2012-01-15 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Henricson, M. (2012). Diskussion. In: Henricson. M (Ed.), Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad: (pp. 471-479). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diskussion
2012 (Swedish)In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 471-479Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19955 (URN)978-91-44-07135-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-11-29 Created: 2012-11-29 Last updated: 2015-09-01Bibliographically approved
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