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Stevenson, Katherine
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Kinsman, L., Rotter, T., Stevenson, K., Bath, B., Goodridge, D., Harrison, L., . . . Westhorp, G. (2014). "The largest Lean transformation in the world": the implementation and evaluation of lean in Saskatchewan healthcare. Healthcare Quarterly, 17(2), 29-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"The largest Lean transformation in the world": the implementation and evaluation of lean in Saskatchewan healthcare
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2014 (English)In: Healthcare Quarterly, ISSN 1710-2774, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 29-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Health has committed to a multi-million dollar investment toward the implementation of Lean methodology across the province's healthcare system. Originating as a production line discipline (the Toyota Production System), Lean has evolved to encompass process improvements including inventory management, waste reduction and quality improvement techniques. With an initial focus on leadership, strategic alignment, training and the creation of a supportive infrastructure (Lean promotion offices), the goal in Saskatchewan is a whole health system transformation that produces "better health, better value, better care, and better teams." Given the scope and scale of the initiative and the commitment of resources, it is vital that a comprehensive, longitudinal evaluation plan be implemented to support ongoing decision-making and program design. The nature of the initiative also offers a unique opportunity to contribute to health quality improvement science by advancing our understanding of the implementation and evaluation of complex, large-scale healthcare interventions. The purpose of this article is to summarize the background to Lean in Saskatchewan and the proposed evaluation methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Longwoods Publishing, 2014
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28002 (URN)25191805 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Keller, C. & Stevenson, K. (2012). Participation in blended learning: Settings and intersections of a master programme in healthcare. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 8(4), 504-520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation in blended learning: Settings and intersections of a master programme in healthcare
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 504-520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines educational settings, intersections and participation in a master programme in healthcare given as blended learning. Regarding communication between learners and teachers dialogical intersections were found between campus and home as well as between campus and work. Furthermore, not only learners but also teachers worked from other physical locations than campus. In communication between learners, dialogical intersections were found between home and campus, work and campus, and between home settings. Discussion and assignment tools were used in other settings than campus and were found to enhance learning and reflection by learners. Communication patterns in synchronous and asynchronous online seminars were characterised by a high share of communication between learners. However, the share of teachers’ postings increased in online seminars devoted to support on course content from expert teachers. The article is concluded with implications of the findings for planning and structuring of blended learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2012
Keywords
blended learning; educational settings; intersections; participation; tools
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20384 (URN)10.1504/IJWBC.2012.049563 (DOI)2-s2.0-84867452933 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Dobson, R. T., Stevenson, K., Busch, A., Scott, D. J., Henry, C. & Wall, P. A. (2009). A quality improvement activity to promote interprofessional collaboration among health professions students. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 73(4), 1-7, Article ID 64.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A quality improvement activity to promote interprofessional collaboration among health professions students
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2009 (English)In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1-7, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a classroom-based curriculum designed to promote interprofessional competencies by having undergraduate students from various health professions work together on system-based problems using quality improvement (QI) methods and tools to improve patient-centered care.

DESIGN: Students from 4 health care programs (nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, and physical therapy) participated in an interprofessional QI activity. In groups of 6 or 7, students completed pre-intervention and post-intervention reflection tools on attitudes relating to interprofessio nal teams, and a tool designed to evaluate group process.

ASSESSMENT: One hundred thirty-four students (76.6%) completed both self-reflection instruments, and 132 (74.2%) completed the post-course group evaluation instrument. Although already high prior to the activity, students' mean post-intervention reflection scores increased for 12 of 16 items. Post-intervention group evaluation scores reflected a high level of satisfaction with the experience.

CONCLUSION: Use of a quality-based case study and QI methodology were an effective approach to enhancing interprofessional experiences among students.

National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28003 (URN)19657497 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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