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Norderyd, Johanna
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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Norderyd, J., Faulks, D., Molina, G., Granlund, M. & Klingberg, G. (2018). Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, 28(1), 71-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

Aim

To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

Design

Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

Results

Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

Conclusions

Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Dentistry Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35380 (URN)10.1111/ipd.12305 (DOI)000418274800010 ()28514516 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038406860 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2018-04-13Bibliographically approved
Norderyd, J. (2017). A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives. (Doctoral dissertation). Jönköping: Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Maintaining good oral health may be more important for children with disabilities than others, since problems with oral health may increase the impact of a disability, or the medical condition may increase the risk for poor oral health. In addition, the risk for oral health problems may be influenced by the functioning of the child. Functioning can also affect the child’s ability to cooperate in the dental setting, and how dental treatment is performed. A medical diagnosis alone does not provide enough information about a child’s functioning, nor oral health. Thus, there is a need for a holistic perspective of oral health and dental health care in children with disabilities. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY) enables a structured assessment of the biopsychosocial consequences of a health condition.

Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate how biopsychosocial factors relate to oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities in a Swedish, and an international context, with special focus on the experience of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (DGA).

Material and methods: The research was conducted using a quantitative, cross-sectional, comparative and descriptive design. An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed with data from a structured interview with children 0-16 years old, referred for specialist dental health care, and their parents/carers. Additional information was retrieved from dental and medical records. Three groups were included in data analyses: one large international group of 218 children from Argentina, France, Ireland and Sweden; one large Swedish group with 99 children with complex disabilities; and one international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries from Argentina, France and Sweden.

Results: The ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health identified both common and varying functional, social and environmental aspects relevant for oral health and oral health care in children who had been referred to specialist dental clinics in four countries. Swedish children with caries experience had been referred to a paediatric dental specialist clinic at a significantly older age than caries-free children. The medical diagnoses were not significantly related to dental caries or child functioning in the large Swedish group with complex disabilities and low caries prevalence, nor was there a significant relationship between dental caries and child functioning. Collinearity between dental caries and problems in the functioning factor ’Interpersonal interactions andrelationships’ was observed in the international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries. DGA sessions with combined medical and dental treatment were common in the large Swedish study group. Children with experience of DGA had more severe problems in intellectual functions than those without experience of DGA. Problems in interpersonal interactions and relationships increased, while problems with mobility decreased, the likelihood for children having had experience of DGA. On international group level, dmft/DMFT was significantly higher in children with the experience of DGA than in those without DGA experience, but looking at Argentina, France and Sweden separately, this was not true for the Swedish children. There were significant, international differences between the prevalence of dmft/DMFT, DGA and environmental barriers.

Conclusion: The biopsychosocial perspective, operationalised by the ICF-CY, contributes a holistic view on oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities. In addition to certain differences, children with different health status from different countries share many functional and environmental aspects, important for oral health and dental health care. Early referral to a paediatric specialist dental clinic seemed favourable for oral health. The medical diagnosis was not related to child functioning or dental caries. Child functioning had a significant impact on DGA, and in children with disabilities and manifest dental caries, child functioning also had a correlation with caries. The dental caries burden was a stronger factor than functioning for the experience of DGA, however, dental health organisation and country context seemed to matter the most. Combining dental and medical procedures during the same GA session is good use of resources for both the individual and the society. To ensure children with complex disabilities to have the possibility of achieving equivalent good oral health as other children, DGA is one important factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, 2017. p. 96
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 082
Keywords
children, disabilities, oral health, dental care, functioning, ICF, dental general anaesthesia
National Category
Dentistry Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35359 (URN)978-91-85835-81-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-05-12, Forum Humanum, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Bergendal, B., Norderyd, J., Nilsson, D., Anderlid, B.-M., Nordgren, A. & Lindstrand, A. (2017). Further evidence for specific IFIH1 mutation as a cause of Singleton-Merten syndrome with phenotypic heterogeneity. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 173(5), 1396-1399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Further evidence for specific IFIH1 mutation as a cause of Singleton-Merten syndrome with phenotypic heterogeneity
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 173, no 5, p. 1396-1399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Singleton-Merten syndrome (MIM 182250) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by early onset periodontitis, root resorption, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and aortic valve or thoracic aorta calcification. The disorder can have significant intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Here, we present a mother and daughter with Singleton-Merten syndrome harboring a previously described pathogenic missense mutation, c.2465G>A p.(Arg822Gln), in IFIH1 (interferon induced with helicase C domain 1), encoding MDA5 (Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5). These data confirm the pathogenicity of IFIH1 c.2465G>A p.(Arg822Gln) for Singleton-Merten syndrome and affirm the striking phenotypic heterogeneity of this disorder. In addition, we expand the Singleton-Merten phenotype by adding severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to the clinical picture. Investigations of known SLE genes as well as a single nucleotide polymorphism suggested to be involved in development of SLE were normal. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Exome sequencing, IFIH1, Singleton-Merten syndrome
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35354 (URN)10.1002/ajmg.a.38214 (DOI)000399691500040 ()28319323 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016014089 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-11 Created: 2017-04-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Norderyd, J., Klingberg, G., Faulks, D. & Granlund, M. (2017). Specialised dental care for children with complex disabilities focusing on child's functioning and need for general anaesthesia. Disability and Rehabilitation, 39(24), 2484-2491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Specialised dental care for children with complex disabilities focusing on child's functioning and need for general anaesthesia
2017 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 39, no 24, p. 2484-2491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To describe and analyse dental care and treatment modalities for children with complex disabilities from a biopsychosocial perspective, with special focus on dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) and its relationship to child's functioning.

METHOD: An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observations, and dental records for patients attending a specialist paediatric dentistry clinic. Descriptive and comparative data analysis was performed. Performance qualifiers from the ICF-CY component Activities and participation were used to calculate functional factors.

RESULTS: Median referral age was 1.5 years and the majority were referred by their paediatrician. Almost all visited a dental hygienist regularly. Dental treatment under GA was common and was combined in 78% of sessions with medical treatment. Children with limitations in their interpersonal interactions and relationships were most likely to have dental GA.

CONCLUSION: Children without caries experience had been referred for specialist dental care at an earlier age than children with caries experience. GA was a common treatment modality and dental and medical treatments were coordinated under the same GA for a majority of children. By using the ICF-CY, it was possible to identify functional limitations characterising children with disabilities that require dental treatment under GA. Implications for Rehabilitation Early referral to a specialist in paediatric dentistry is valuable for oral disease prevention in children with disabilities. Availability of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) is also important. Combining dental and medical interventions during the same GA session optimises resources both for the individual and for the health organisation. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships are more likely to need dental treatment under GA than other children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Built heritages, Human capital, Regional growth, Multilevel
National Category
Dentistry Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34117 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2016.1236406 (DOI)000410565300004 ()27871192 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84996549792 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-11-29 Created: 2016-11-29 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved
Norderyd, J., Graf, J., Marcusson, A., Nilsson, K., Sjöstrand, E., Steinwall, G., . . . Bågesund, M. (2017). Sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops in children with excessive drooling - a pilot study. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, 27(1), 22-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops in children with excessive drooling - a pilot study
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Drooling can be a severe disability and have high impact on daily life. Reversible treatment is preferable.

AIM: To analyse whether sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops is a useful reversible treatment option for severe drooling in children with disabilities.

DESIGN: The study had a prospective, single-system research design. The participants served as their own controls. The study period was 3 weeks without treatment, 4 weeks with atropine eyedrop solution 10 mg/mL one drop a day followed by 4 weeks of one drop twice a day. Parents' rating of their child's drooling was assessed on a 100-mm VAS, and unstimulated salivary secretion rate measurement was performed together with notations about side effects and practicality.

RESULTS: Parents' VAS assessment of drooling decreased from a median (range) of 74 (40-98) at baseline to 48 (18-88) (P = 0.05) and 32 (12-85) (P = 0.004) after 4 weeks of atropine once a day and another 4 weeks of atropine twice a day, respectively (n = 11). Unstimulated salivary secretion rates decreased from baseline to end of study (P = 0.032). Several parents complained about difficult administration. No irreversible side effects were noted.

CONCLUSIONS: Sublingual atropine eyedrops may be an alternative for treatment of severe drooling in children with disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34166 (URN)10.1111/ipd.12219 (DOI)000389925200005 ()26708211 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84952909969 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Region Östergötland
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Bergendal, B., Norderyd, J., Zhou, X., Klar, J. & Dahl, N. (2016). Abnormal primary and permanent dentitions with ectodermal symptoms predict WNT10A deficiency. BMC Medical Genetics, 17(1), Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abnormal primary and permanent dentitions with ectodermal symptoms predict WNT10A deficiency
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2016 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The WNT10A protein is critical for the development of ectodermal appendages. Variants in the WNT10A gene may be associated with a spectrum of ectodermal abnormalities including extensive tooth agenesis.

METHODS: In seven patients with severe tooth agenesis we identified anomalies in primary dentition and additional ectodermal symptoms, and assessed WNT10A mutations by genetic analysis.

RESULTS: Investigation of primary dentition revealed peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors and three individuals had agenesis of at least two primary teeth. The permanent dentition was severely affected in all individuals with a mean of 21 missing teeth. Primary teeth were most often present in positions were succedaneous teeth were missing. Furthermore, most existing molars had taurodontism. Light, brittle or coarse hair was reported in all seven individuals, hyperhidrosis of palms and soles in six individuals and nail anomalies in two individuals. The anomalies in primary dentition preceded most of the additional ectodermal symptoms. Genetic analysis revealed that all seven individuals were homozygous or compound heterozygous for WNT10A mutations resulting in C107X, E222X and F228I.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that tooth agenesis and/or peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors, severe oligodontia of permanent dentition as well as ectodermal symptoms of varying severity may be predictors of bi-allelic WNT10A mutations of importance for diagnosis, counselling and follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Dental; Ectodermal dysplasia; Permanent dentition; Primary dentition; WNT10A mutations
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34164 (URN)10.1186/s12881-016-0349-4 (DOI)000389277800001 ()27881089 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84997328007 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Klingberg, G. & Norderyd, J. (2016). Etik i børnetandplejen med særligt fokus på børn med funktionsnedsættelse eller langvarig sygdom. Tandlaegebladet, 120(9), 800-806
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etik i børnetandplejen med særligt fokus på børn med funktionsnedsættelse eller langvarig sygdom
2016 (English)In: Tandlaegebladet, ISSN 0039-9353, Vol. 120, no 9, p. 800-806Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [da]

I dag konsulteres tandplejen af flere og flere børn og unge med funktionsnedsættelse eller langvarig sygdom. Disse patienter skal principielt tiltales og varetages på samme måde som alle andre patienter; men i behandlingen af børn med funktionsnedsættelse eller sygdom opstår der nok oftere situationer og etiske dilemmaer, hvor tandlægen føler behov for at standse op, reflektere og analysere, inden hun/ han går videre med behandlingen. Autonomi, integritet og informeret samtykke er vigtige begreber i mødet med patient og forældre, og tandlægen må også indimellem være parat til at vikariere autonomi.

Abstract [en]

Dental care for children with disabilities – ethical considerationsAll dental care demands an ethical approach, maybe even more so in child dental care. Today more children with disabilities or longterm illness come to the dentist. How these children should be met and cared for does not differ from other patients, but in dental care for children with disabilities and long-term illness it may be more likely for situations and ethical dilemmas to evolve, where the dentist must stop, reflect, and analyze before continuing with treatment. Autonomy, integrity, and informed consent are important concepts when meeting patients and parents. The dentist also has to be prepared to sometimes step in and substitute autonomy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
København: Tandlægeforeningen, 2016
Keywords
Ethics, professional, dental, child
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34125 (URN)
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Norderyd, J., Lillvist, A., Klingberg, G., Faulks, D. & Granlund, M. (2015). Oral health, medical diagnoses, and functioning profiles in children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care – a study using the ICF-CY. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(16), 1431-1438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral health, medical diagnoses, and functioning profiles in children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care – a study using the ICF-CY
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2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 16, p. 1431-1438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe 0–16-year-old children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care from a biopsychosocial perspective, with focus on relationship between oral health, medical diagnosis, and functioning. Method: A questionnaire with an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observation, and information from dental records. Descriptive data analysis was performed together with principle component analysis to calculate factors of functioning used in cluster analysis in order to present functioning profiles. Results: Ninety-nine children with at least one major medical diagnosis were included. Twenty had previous caries experience. Two factors of functioning were calculated, labelled “Physical ability” and “Intellectual ability, communication, and behaviour”. Based on functioning profiles three clusters were determined. There were no statistically significant differences in caries experience between medical diagnoses or clusters. Conclusion: It was possible to identify profiles of functioning in children with disabilities receiving specialist dental care. Despite complex disabilities, the children had good oral health. Neither medical diagnosis nor functioning was found to have a clear relationship with oral health. To understand the environmental context leading to high-quality oral health, further studies of dental management in relation to medical and oral diagnoses and child functioning are needed.

Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Child Oral Health

  • The use of ICF-CY makes it possible for paediatric dentists to assess children’s functioning, disability, and health from a biopsychosocial perspective, showing that the medical diagnosis alone is not enough to assess functions relevant for oral health in the individual.

  • In order to adequately organize, plan, and improve dental care for this heterogenic group of young patients with disabilities a biopsychosocial approach is valuable, aiding a holistic perspective on oral health.

  • Despite complex medical and functional disabilities that may challenge oral health and dental care, this study finds oral health to be good in a group of children with disabilities attending a specialist dental clinic.

Keywords
Children, ICF-CY, oral health
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25339 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.964374 (DOI)000358630700005 ()25250806 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84934280429 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Arzoo, P. S., Klar, J., Bergendal, B., Norderyd, J. & Dahl, N. (2014). WNT10A mutations account for ¼ of population-based isolated oligodontia and show phenotypic correlations. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 164(2), 353-359
Open this publication in new window or tab >>WNT10A mutations account for ¼ of population-based isolated oligodontia and show phenotypic correlations
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2014 (English)In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 164, no 2, p. 353-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A large proportion (>50%) of patients with isolated oligodontia were recently reported with WNT10A mutations. We have analyzed a population-based cohort of 102 individuals diagnosed with non-syndromic oligodontia and a mean of 8.2 missing teeth. The cohort included 94 families and screening of WNT10A identified that 26 probands (27.7%) had at least one WNT10A variant. When we included the MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, and EDARADD genes, 38.3% of probands were positive for a mutation. Biallelic WNT10A mutations were strongly associated with a larger number of missing teeth (11.09) when compared to both monoallelic WNT10 mutations (6.82) and the group without mutations in WNT10A, MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD (7.77). Genotype–phenotype analysis of individuals with WNT10A mutations showed that premolars were the most common missing teeth. Furthermore, biallelic WNT10A mutations were associated with absence of maxillary and mandibular molars as well as mandibular central incisors. Maxillary central incisors were always present. Thus, our study indicates that WNT10A mutations are associated with both the type and numbers of missing teeth. Furthermore, we show that this population-based cohort of isolated oligodontia had a considerably lower frequency of mutated WNT10A alleles and a lower mean number of missing teeth when compared to patients recruited from dental specialist centers.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25341 (URN)10.1002/ajmg.a.36243 (DOI)000331067100010 ()24449199 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892875876 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Faulks, D., Norderyd, J., Molina, G., Macgiolla Phadraig, C., Scagnet, G., Eschevins, C. & Hennequin, M. (2013). Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to describe children referred to special care or paediatric dental services. PLoS ONE, 8(4), Article ID e61993.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to describe children referred to special care or paediatric dental services
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e61993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children in dentistry are traditionally described in terms of medical diagnosis and prevalence of oral disease. This approach gives little information regarding a child's capacity to maintain oral health or regarding the social determinants of oral health. The biopsychosocial approach, embodied in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) (WHO), provides a wider picture of a child's real-life experience, but practical tools for the application of this model are lacking. This article describes the preliminary empirical study necessary for development of such a tool - an ICF-CY Core Set for Oral Health. An ICF-CY questionnaire was used to identify the medical, functional, social and environmental context of 218 children and adolescents referred to special care or paediatric dental services in France, Sweden, Argentina and Ireland (mean age 8 years ± 3.6 yrs). International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) diagnoses included disorders of the nervous system (26.1%), Down syndrome (22.0%), mental retardation (17.0%), autistic disorders (16.1%), and dental anxiety alone (11.0%). The most frequently impaired items in the ICF Body functions domain were 'Intellectual functions', 'High-level cognitive functions', and 'Attention functions'. In the Activities and Participation domain, participation restriction was frequently reported for 25 items including 'Handling stress', 'Caring for body parts', 'Looking after one's health' and 'Speaking'. In the Environment domain, facilitating items included 'Support of friends', 'Attitude of friends' and 'Support of immediate family'. One item was reported as an environmental barrier - 'Societal attitudes'. The ICF-CY can be used to highlight common profiles of functioning, activities, participation and environment shared by children in relation to oral health, despite widely differing medical, social and geographical contexts. The results of this empirical study might be used to develop an ICF-CY Core Set for Oral Health - a holistic but practical tool for clinical and epidemiological use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2013
Keywords
paediatric dentistry, ICF-CY
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22620 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0061993 (DOI)000317893400142 ()23614000 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84876184034 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2013-11-27 Created: 2013-11-27 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
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