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Publications (10 of 119) Show all publications
Egonsdotter, G., Bengtsson, S., Israelsson, M. & Borell, K. (2018). Child protection and cultural awareness: Simulation-based learning. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child protection and cultural awareness: Simulation-based learning
2018 (English)In: Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, ISSN 1531-3204, E-ISSN 1531-3212Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Social work educators have long struggled with the challenge of finding appropriate strategies for fostering cultural awareness among their students. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how a computer-based simulation, SimChild, can be used in teaching about child protection to enhance cultural awareness among students and expand their insight into how personal biases can affect professional practice. In SimChild, individual students can assume the role of social worker and then collectively discuss the patterns emerging after their individual assessments have been aggregated. This study, based primarily on focus group data, reflects testing conducted at three Swedish universities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Cultural awareness, simulation, child protection, ethnicity, social work education
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41050 (URN)10.1080/15313204.2018.1493013 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049936180 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-28
Westermark, Å. & Borell, K. (2018). Human service siting conflicts as social movements. Geoforum, 94, 107-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human service siting conflicts as social movements
2018 (English)In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 94, p. 107-109Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is deeply ironic that the social movement perspective has so far scarcely been utilised to analyse local protests against establishments of human service enterprises, as the perspective was originally formulated in just such a context. The social movement approach could inject new vitality into a field of research that has become increasingly marginalised and enable human geographers and other social scientists to reconnect to the key issues of socio-spatial exclusion that were raised 30–40 years ago, but now with theoretically informed perspectives. At the same time, social movement research has much to gain from returning to the study of protest movements opposing the establishment of human service enterprises: they are local and thus typical of most social movements, and their success or failure, which lacks the ambiguity so often noted in social movement research, can be studied from a lifecycle perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Framing, NIMBY, Social movements, Social services
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40022 (URN)10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.05.017 (DOI)000439537900012 ()2-s2.0-85047408159 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-08 Created: 2018-06-08 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Borell, K. & Westermark, Å. (2018). Siting of human services facilities and the not in my back yard phenomenon: a critical research review. Community Development Journal, 53(2), 246-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Siting of human services facilities and the not in my back yard phenomenon: a critical research review
2018 (English)In: Community Development Journal, ISSN 0010-3802, E-ISSN 1468-2656, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current research on local siting conflicts are primarily about environmental threats. Following a boom during the two last decades of the 1900s, research on community opposition to the establishment of human services is a shrinking field with inadequate articulation and comparisons of various approaches. The aim of this research review is to critically scrutinize the first wave of research on local protests against human services and expose and contrast later approaches in order to lay the necessary groundwork for synthesis attempts. The first wave approach is characterized by its far-reaching generalization claims; all local protests against perceived social threats were seen as instances of Not In My Back Yard protests and as a function of general, hierarchically arranged attitudes toward client groups. By contrast, in later attempts to shed light upon neighbourhood protests, real life protests against the establishment of human services – not general attitudinal data – are focused upon. But the degree of contextualizing varies greatly within this more protest-centred research. The indirect approach is based on data that are collected in interviews with human service administrators and concern the extent and duration of neighbors’ protests, while in the direct approach the protests are studied as such, and especially issues having to do with the local protests’ ability to generate public support. In this article, the alternatives to the first wave of research on siting conflicts have been demonstrated for the first time and contrasted with each other. This is a necessary requirement and a first step for efforts to provide the syntheses that this research area so sorely needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
academic research, hierarchical system, local participation, not in my back yard response, planning theory, popular protest, research work, theoretical study, welfare provision
National Category
Sociology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34235 (URN)10.1093/cdj/bsw039 (DOI)000430680600004 ()2-s2.0-85047926616 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Aktaş, V., Nilsson, M. & Borell, K. (2018). Social scientist under threat: Resistance and self-censorship in Turkish academia. British Journal of Educational Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social scientist under threat: Resistance and self-censorship in Turkish academia
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Studies, ISSN 0007-1005, E-ISSN 1467-8527Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Attacks on academic freedom in Turkey have become increasingly systematic in recent years and thousands of academics have been dismissed. This study reflects on the effects of this worsening repression through interviews with academics in the social sciences, both those dismissed and those still active in their profession. Although the dismissed academics are socially in a very precarious position, they are continuing their scholarly activities in alternative, underground forms. This resistance stands in contrast to the accommodation and self-censorship that seem, according to the interviewees, to prevail in university departments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
academic freedom, Turkey, self-censorship, resistance
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41128 (URN)10.1080/00071005.2018.1502872 (DOI)XYZ ()2-s2.0-85052130568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-09-19
Connidis, I. A., Borell, K. & Ghazanfareeon Karlsson, S. (2017). Ambivalence and Living Apart Together in Later Life: A Critical Research Proposal. Journal of Marriage and Family, 79(5), 1404-1418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambivalence and Living Apart Together in Later Life: A Critical Research Proposal
2017 (English)In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 1404-1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most unattached older persons who would like an intimate partnership do not want to remarry or be in a marriage-like relationship. A growing trend is to live apart together (LAT) in an ongoing intimate relationship that does not include a common home. We address the debate about whether LAT constitutes a new form of intimate relationship in a critical assessment of research on LAT relationships that applies ambivalence and concepts from the life course perspective. We conclude that among older but not younger adults, LAT relationships are generally a stable alternative to living with a partner, negotiated in the context of current social institutions and arrangements. We propose research questions that address later life living apart together as an innovative alternative intimate relationship. We encourage comparative work on the unique challenges of later life living apart together, their implications for other family ties, and their connection to social and cultural arrangements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36741 (URN)10.1111/jomf.12417 (DOI)000409317900012 ()2-s2.0-85028866633 (Scopus ID)HLKGlobalaIS, HHJSALVEIS (Local ID)HLKGlobalaIS, HHJSALVEIS (Archive number)HLKGlobalaIS, HHJSALVEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved
Borell, K. (2017). Elusive Jannah: The Somali Diaspora and a Borderless Muslim Identity [Review]. International Sociology, 32(2), 250-252
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elusive Jannah: The Somali Diaspora and a Borderless Muslim Identity
2017 (English)In: International Sociology, ISSN 0268-5809, E-ISSN 1461-7242, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 250-252Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Diaspora, Muslim identity, Somali diaspora
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36581 (URN)10.1177/0268580916687470 (DOI)000403233300026 ()
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Nilsson, M. & Borell, K. (2017). Everyday resistance to violent radicalism and fundamentalism: Sufi strategies in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at Seventh International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society: Understanding Globalism, Respecting Difference, April 17–18, London, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday resistance to violent radicalism and fundamentalism: Sufi strategies in Sweden
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Using qualitative interviews with representatives of Sufi communities in Sweden, the study directs attention toward the strategies developed byEuropean Muslims themselves in fighting violent radicalism and fundamentalism.

National Category
Religious Studies Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36742 (URN)
Conference
Seventh International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society: Understanding Globalism, Respecting Difference, April 17–18, London, UK
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2017-10-04Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Nilsson, M. & Borell, K. (2017). Muslims opposing violent radicalism and extremism: Strategies of Swedish Sufi communities. Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 37(2), 183-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muslims opposing violent radicalism and extremism: Strategies of Swedish Sufi communities
2017 (English)In: Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, ISSN 1360-2004, E-ISSN 1469-9591, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Europe has seen the development of a new research agenda in response to Islamist terror attacks of recent years. Researchers are not only trying to solve the “radicalization puzzle” in order to understand the reasons why young Muslims in Western countries are attracted to extremism, but they are also making proposals for de-radicalizing extremists and creating relationships of trust with Muslim communities. Directly or indirectly, Europe’s Muslim minorities are the objects of the interventions and preventive work under discussion. This study suggests an alternative approach. Rather than regarding Muslims in Europe as more or less passive objects of various anti-extremism interventions, it directs attention toward the strategies developed by European Muslims themselves in fighting Islamist extremism. Using qualitative interviews with leaders of five Sufi communities in Sweden, the study examines a series of strategies for meeting the challenges posed by extremists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36291 (URN)10.1080/13602004.2017.1339498 (DOI)000406098900004 ()2-s2.0-85021070538 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-10-04Bibliographically approved
Borell, K. (2016). Book Review: The Routledge International Handbook on Hate Crime [Review]. Journal of Sociology, 52(4), 909-910
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review: The Routledge International Handbook on Hate Crime
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0004-8690, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 909-910Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34238 (URN)10.1177/1440783315626060 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Borell, K. (2016). Conspiracy Theories in Jihadist and Anti-Jihadist Thought: A Content Analysis of Online Extremism. In: : . Paper presented at Vox-Pol Mid-Project Conference: Taking Stock of Research on Violent Online Political Extremism, Dublin, Ireland, June 22–24, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conspiracy Theories in Jihadist and Anti-Jihadist Thought: A Content Analysis of Online Extremism
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34239 (URN)
Conference
Vox-Pol Mid-Project Conference: Taking Stock of Research on Violent Online Political Extremism, Dublin, Ireland, June 22–24, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2016-12-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2971-7393

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