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Knutsson, Susanne
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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Lindberg, E., Karlsson, P. & Knutsson, S. (2018). Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory – A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students. Nurse Education Today, 61, 60-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory – A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students
2018 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 61, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Creative strategies are needed in nurse education to integrate theory, practice and lived experiences. Towards that end, reflective seminars, conducted in congruence with reflective lifeworld theory and caring science, were implemented during a three-year nursing programme. The reflection seminars took place during the theoretical parts of education and the clinical placements. Each reflection group consisted of six to nine students, and the seminars were led by a lecturer from the university.

Objectives

This article aims to describe the experiences of learning about caring science by participating in reflective seminars that were integrated into courses during a three-year nursing education programme.

Design

A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative group interviews were conducted.

Setting

The study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden.

Participants

Twenty three students, 19 women and four men, volunteered to participate. All participants were at the end of a three-year nurse education programme. Data were collected through four group interviews with five to seven participants in each group.

Methods

This study used a reflective lifeworld research approach based on phenomenological philosophy.

Results

The findings reveal that nursing students experience reflective seminars as being valuable for their professional development. The result is described in more detail via four meaning units: An obtained awareness of the value of reflection in clinical practice; Reflection contributes to an approach of thoughtfulness; Caring science has become second nature, and Reflection as a strength and a challenge at the threshold of a profession.

Conclusions

This study contributes to the understanding of reflective seminars grounded in lifeworld theory as a didactic strategy that enables students to increase their knowledge of caring science and develop their reflective skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Caring science, Education, Learning, Nursing, Reflection, adult, awareness, clinical article, clinical practice, controlled study, female, human, interview, male, nursing education, nursing student, phenomenology, professional development, skill, Sweden, theoretical study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38309 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.016 (DOI)000425073000012 ()29175689 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034771314 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-30 Created: 2017-12-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Enskär, K., Andersson-Gäre, B. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches. Nordic journal of nursing research, 37(2), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches
2017 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An illness or injury sustained by a family member affects all family members. It is consequently important that a child’s need to be involved in a family member’s care is clearly recognized by healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals’ approaches to children as relatives of a parent being cared for in a clinical setting. A web-based study-specific questionnaire was sent and responded to by 1052 healthcare professionals in Sweden. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis. The results show that guidelines and routines are often lacking regarding involving children in the care of a parent. Compared to other areas, psychiatric units seem to have enacted routines and guidelines to a greater extent than other units. The results indicate that structured approaches based on an awareness of the children’s needs as well as a child-friendly environment are vital in family-focused care. These aspects need to be prioritized by managers in order to support children’s needs and promote health and wellbeing for the whole family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
child; children as relatives; healthcare professionals; ill parent; web questionnaire
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34082 (URN)10.1177/2057158516662538 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2017). Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness. Nursing Open, 4(4), 267-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness
2017 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Children, content analysis, parental illness, school nurse, school situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37583 (URN)10.1002/nop2.92 (DOI)000418555300009 ()29085652 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2082
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Enskär, K. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent at an adult ICU. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 39, 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent at an adult ICU
2017 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 39, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Despite a cultural change in visitation policies for children (0-17 years) in the intensive care unit (ICU) to a more open approach, children are still restricted from visiting for various reasons. To overcome these obstacles, it is vital to determine what is needed while encountering a child.

AIM:

To elucidate nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent in an adult ICU.

METHOD:

An explorative inductive qualitative design was used, entailing focus group interviews with 23 nurses working at a general ICU. The interviews were analysed according to inductive content analysis.

RESULTS:

The findings show components that constitute the encounter with children as relatives at the ICU, as experienced by ICU nurses: nurses need to be engaged and motivated; parents need to be motivated; the child needs individual guidance; and a structured follow-up is needed. This reflects a child-focused encounter.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nurses need to adopt a holistic view, learn to see and care for the child individually, and be able to engage parents in supporting their children. To accomplish this the nurses need engagement and motivation, and must have knowledge about what constitutes a caring encounter, in order to achieve a caring child-focused encounter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Children; Critically ill; Encounter; Family; Intensive care unit; Qualitative study; Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34205 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2016.09.003 (DOI)000396956400002 ()28209429 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012277220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2082
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2017-05-02Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Lundvall, M. & Lindberg, E. (2017). Participating in reflection seminars: Progressing towards a deeper understanding of caring science described by nursing students. Nordic journal of nursing research, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participating in reflection seminars: Progressing towards a deeper understanding of caring science described by nursing students
2017 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Few studies focus on how reflection seminars can support the learning of knowledge in caring science when inserted throughout the curriculum. The aim of this study was to describe students’ experiences of participating in reflection seminars, using lifeworld theory and focusing on caring science. A qualitative descriptive study based on interviews was carried out, and ten students between 21 and 33 years of age volunteered to participate. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used. Reflection seminars contribute to developing students’ ability to relate to caring and life. A deeper understanding is obtained when reflection sessions are spread over a longer period and when reflection becomes a process. The process helps caring science to become more natural and useful. Reflective seminaries based on a theoretical foundation contribute to facilitate learning more readily. A good atmosphere pervaded by a lifeworld perspective characterized by openness and thoughtfulness contributes to learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
caring science, lifeworld perspective, nursing education, reflection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38420 (URN)10.1177/2057158517721832 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-14
Nygårdh, A., Sherwood, G., Sandberg, T., Rehn, J. & Knutsson, S. (2017). The visibility of QSEN competencies in clinical assessment tools in Swedish nurse education. Nurse Education Today, 59, 110-117, Article ID S0260-6917(17)30207-1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The visibility of QSEN competencies in clinical assessment tools in Swedish nurse education
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 59, p. 110-117, article id S0260-6917(17)30207-1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Prospective nurses need specific and sufficient knowledge to be able to provide quality care. The Swedish Society of Nursing has emphasized the importance of the six quality and safety competencies (QSEN), originated in the US, in Swedish nursing education.

PURPOSE: To investigate the visibility of the QSEN competencies in the assessment tools used in clinical practice

METHOD: A quantitative descriptive method was used to analyze assessment tools from 23 universities.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Teamwork and collaboration was the most visible competency. Patient-centered care was visible to a large degree but was not referred to by name. Informatics was the least visible, a notable concern since all nurses should be competent in informatics to provide quality and safety in care. These results provide guidance as academic and clinical programs around the world implement assessment of how well nurses have developed these essential quality and safety competencies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Assessment tool, Clinical education, QSEN, Student nurses
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37619 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.003 (DOI)000416187800020 ()28985548 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030680352 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HHJKvalitetIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HHJKvalitetIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HHJKvalitetIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Henricson, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2016). Are children as relatives our responsibility? How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 33-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are children as relatives our responsibility? How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to elucidate how nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives to a parent with a serious physical illness.

Method: A qualitative explorative design with focus group interviews was used. In total, 22 nurses working at one neurological, one haematological and two oncological wards were interviewed. The transcripts from the interviews were analysed in steps in accordance with inductive qualitative content analysis.

Results: This study revealed six variations in how nurses perceived their role in the encounter with child relatives, ranging from being convinced that it is not their responsibility to being aware of the children's situation and working systematically to support them.

Conclusion: Nurses should consider whether their patients have children who might be affected by their parent's illness. The nurses' self-confidence when meeting these children must be increased by education in order to strengthen their professional role. Furthermore, guidelines on how to encounter child relatives are required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Children as relatives; Nursing; Parents; Qualitative research; Support
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32061 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.09.005 (DOI)000389172500005 ()27865250 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988632759 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-26 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S. & Bergbom, I. (2016). Children's thoughts and feelings related to visiting critically ill relatives in an adult ICU: A qualitative study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 32, 33-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's thoughts and feelings related to visiting critically ill relatives in an adult ICU: A qualitative study
2016 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 32, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

To describe and understand children's thoughts and feelings related to visiting critically ill relatives or family members in an adult intensive care unit.

DESIGN:

A qualitative descriptive study.

METHOD:

Twenty-eight children (14 girls; 14 boys) that had visited a critically ill relative or family member in an adult intensive care unit were invited to participate in an interview. The material was analysed inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic philosophy and Doverborg and Pramling Samuelsson's method about interviews and dialogues with children.

RESULTS:

Children with a seriously ill/injured relative suffer. However, visiting seems to alleviate suffering. Visiting and being present as a part of the situation brought positive feelings of involvement and made it possible to show that they wanted to care for the relative. The sick relative was always on the child's mind and seeing and being with them in the intensive care unit resulted in relief and calmness, even if the relative's situation sometimes evoked feelings of despair and fear.

CONCLUSION:

Knowledge and awareness of the fact that children are affected by the relative's condition and for their wellbeing needs to visit, caring actions must focus on helping the child become involved in the relative's situation in order to alleviate suffering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Children; Critically ill; Family; Feelings; Hermeneutics; Intensive care unit; Qualitative study; Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28532 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2015.07.007 (DOI)000366954700005 ()26596250 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84954539535 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Björk, M., Knutsson, S., Granlund, M. & Enskär, K. (2016). Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 33(3), 173-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse.

Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children’s health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory.

Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis.

Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children’s trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

Keywords
Childhood cancer, Sweden, Young child
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26384 (URN)10.1177/1043454215610489 (DOI)000373837100002 ()26655332 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962691659 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Johansson, L., Knutsson, S., Bergbom, I. & Lindahl, B. (2016). Noise in the ICU patient room - Staff knowledge and clinical improvements. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 35, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Noise in the ICU patient room - Staff knowledge and clinical improvements
2016 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 35, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The acoustic environment in the intensive care unit patient room, with high sound levels and unpredictable sounds, is known to be poor and stressful. Therefore, the present study had two aims: to investigate staff knowledge concerning noise in the intensive care unit and: to identify staff suggestions for improving the sound environment in the intensive care unit patient room.

Method: A web-based knowledge questionnaire including 10 questions was distributed to 1047 staff members at nine intensive care unit. Moreover, 20 physicians, nurses and enrolled nurses were interviewed and asked to give suggestions for improvement.

Results: None of the respondents answered the whole questionnaire correctly; mean value was four correct answers. In the interview part, three categories emerged: improving staff's own care actions and behaviour; improving strategies requiring staff interaction; and improving physical space and technical design.

Conclusion: The results from the questionnaire showed that the staff had low theoretical knowledge concerning sound and noise in the intensive care unit. However, the staff suggested many improvement measures, but also described difficulties and barriers. The results from this study can be used in the design of future interventions to reduce noise in the intensive care unit as well as in other settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Improvements, Intensive care, Knowledge, Noise, clinical study, doctor nurse relation, doctor patient relation, human, intensive care unit, interview, questionnaire, staff, theoretical model
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34204 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2016.02.005 (DOI)000377615900001 ()26993404 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961113611 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
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