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Andersson, Åke E.
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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Andersson, D. E. & Andersson, Å. E. (2019). Phase transitions as a cause of economic development. Environment and planning A
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phase transitions as a cause of economic development
2019 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Economic development spans centuries and continents. Underlying infrastructural causes of development, such as institutions and networks, are subject to slow but persistent change. Accumulated infrastructural changes eventually become so substantial that they trigger a phase transition. Such transitions disrupt the prior conditions for economic activities and network interdependencies, requiring radically transformed production techniques, organizations and location patterns. The interplay of economic equilibria and structural changes requires a theoretical integration of the slow time scale of infrastructural change and the fast time scale of market equilibration. This paper presents a theory that encompasses both rapidly and slowly changing variables and illustrates how infrequent phase transitions caused four logistical revolutions in Europe over the past millennium. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
development, Infrastructure, institutions, logistical revolution, phase transition
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42855 (URN)10.1177/0308518X18803112 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059966179 (Scopus ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Local ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Archive number)IHHÖvrigtIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04
Andersson, Å. E. & Johansson, B. (2018). Inside and outside the black box: organization of interdependencies. The annals of regional science, 61(3), 501-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inside and outside the black box: organization of interdependencies
2018 (English)In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 501-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Production theory has remained substantially unchanged since the publication of the theory of production by Frisch (Theory of production, D. Reidel, Dordrecht, 1928; Nord613 Tidskr Tek Økon 1:12–27, 1935). The theory is based on the idea of a firm deciding on the possible input and output combinations of a single unit of production. His theory was substantially copied in contributions by Carlson (A study on the pure theory of production, University of Chicago, Chicago, 1939) and Schneider (Einführung in die Wirtschaftstheorie. 4 Bände, Mohr, Tübingen, 1947), and later by practically all textbooks in microeconomics. The idea is to model the firm as a “black box” in which a finite number of externally purchased inputs are transformed into a finite number of outputs to be sold in the market(s). Most of the time, the prices are externally determined. Often, the production process is summarized by some simplified production function as, for example, in the form of a CES function. Another and conceptually richer approach is the formulation of an activity analysis model. In the latter case, simple internal interdependencies can be included. In this paper, we indicate how internal interdependencies can also be modeled within a special CES framework. In recent decades, there has been a remarkable growth in the number of production units of firms such as IKEA, Walmart and Apple to name a few such global networking firms. Most of the analysis of these network firms has been modeled by logistics and other operations-research analysts (Simchi-Levi et al. 2008) and to a limited extent by researchers in business administration schools. Very little has been done in economics. We propose a modeling approach consistent with the microeconomic theory. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42292 (URN)10.1007/s00168-018-0886-1 (DOI)000452762400005 ()2-s2.0-85057327952 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, Å. E. & Johansson, B. (2018). Internal and external knowledge and development in regions. In: K. Matsushima, & W. P. Anderson (Ed.), Transportation, knowledge and space in urban and regional economics: (pp. 319-348). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal and external knowledge and development in regions
2018 (English)In: Transportation, knowledge and space in urban and regional economics / [ed] K. Matsushima, & W. P. Anderson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 319-348Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42415 (URN)978-1-78536-605-5 (ISBN)978-1-78536-606-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-02 Created: 2019-01-02 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, D. E. & Andersson, Å. E. (2016). Political entrepreneurship, infrastructure and regional development. In: C. Karlsson, C. Silander, D. Silander (Ed.), Political entrepreneurship: Regional growth and entrepreneurial diversity in Sweden (pp. 62-82). Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political entrepreneurship, infrastructure and regional development
2016 (English)In: Political entrepreneurship: Regional growth and entrepreneurial diversity in Sweden / [ed] C. Karlsson, C. Silander, D. Silander, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 62-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016
Series
New Horizons in Leadership Studies
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38301 (URN)000403822500005 ()978-1-78536-893-6 (ISBN)978-1-78536-349-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-28 Created: 2017-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, Å. E., Andersson, D. E., Harsman, B. & Daghbashyan, Z. (2015). Complexity, scientific creativity and clustering. In: Karima Kourtit, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough (Ed.), The rise of the city: Spatial dynamics in the urban century (pp. 15-32). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complexity, scientific creativity and clustering
2015 (English)In: The rise of the city: Spatial dynamics in the urban century / [ed] Karima Kourtit, Peter Nijkamp and Roger R. Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 15-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29876 (URN)10.4337/9781783475360 (DOI)000372019400002 ()2-s2.0-84957952564 (Scopus ID)9781783475360 (ISBN)9781783475353 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-05-10 Created: 2016-05-10 Last updated: 2016-11-27Bibliographically approved
Andersson, Å. E. & Andersson, D. E. (2015). Creative cities and the new global hierarchy. Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, 8(3), 181-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creative cities and the new global hierarchy
2015 (English)In: Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, ISSN 1874-463X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 181-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The world experienced three major urbanization processes between the eleventh and the twentieth century. All three periods of city growth were associated with revolutionary improvements in the logistical systems. In large parts of the world the third logistical revolution (the Industrial Revolution) has not yet come to an end. In industrializing countries and regions urbanization is thus very rapid. Concurrently, a new and fourth logistical revolution is changing the economic, social and regional structure of the post-industrial parts of the world, leading to the creation of a new Creative Society. A key aspect of this development is the increasing role of creative and innovative city regions with global linkages. These regions now form a new supranational rank-size distribution, which is centred on a few conurbations in Europe, North America and East Asia. Most post-industrial economic development is taking place in a small number of highly ranked creative regions, while other regions are suffering from the “creative destruction” of their traditional industries. One consequence of this restructuring is increasing regional income inequalities in the post-industrial nations.

Keywords
Creative Society, Post-industrial, Trust, Tolerance, Institutions, Logistical revolution, Inter-regional inequality
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28133 (URN)10.1007/s12061-015-9141-7 (DOI)000363022700002 ()2-s2.0-84925002802 (Scopus ID)IHHNationalekonomiIS (Local ID)IHHNationalekonomiIS (Archive number)IHHNationalekonomiIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-08 Last updated: 2015-12-03Bibliographically approved
Andersson, D. E., Andersson, Å. E. & Daghbashyan, Z. (2015). Unemployment in European regions: structural problems versus the Eurozone hypothesis. Journal of Economic Geography, 15(5), 883-905
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unemployment in European regions: structural problems versus the Eurozone hypothesis
2015 (English)In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 883-905Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unemployment rates differ dramatically across European regions. This article analyses these differences by integrating institutional and spatial perspectives into a unified dynamic framework distinguishing between slow and fast processes of change. The framework forms the basis for an econometric model that is used to analyse labour market differences among European Nomenclature des unite ́s territoriales statistiques 2 regions. The results of random-effects models indicate that four key factors—all of which are of the slowly changing type—explain a large part of the variation in unemployment as well as employment rates. Flexible labour market regulations and above-average levels of interpersonal trust are institutional factors that reduce unemployment. Accessibility factors such as inter-regional transport connectivity and local access to skilled workers have similarly substantial effects. Whether a region belongs to the Eurozone or not seems to be less important.

Keywords
Unemployment, NUTS2 regions, accessibility, institutions, Euro
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28124 (URN)10.1093/jeg/lbu058 (DOI)000361293200003 ()2-s2.0-84940854156 (Scopus ID)IHHEFSIS (Local ID)IHHEFSIS (Archive number)IHHEFSIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Andersson, Å. E., Andersson, D. E., Daghbashyan, Z. & Hårsman, B. (2014). Location and spatial clustering of artists. Regional Science and Urban Economics, 47, 128-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Location and spatial clustering of artists
2014 (English)In: Regional Science and Urban Economics, ISSN 0166-0462, E-ISSN 1879-2308, Vol. 47, p. 128-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surveys of artists' location choices show that they disproportionately reside in large cities. This paper introduces a model that attempts to explain this urban preference. The model includes four factors: access to other artists; access to consumer demand; access to service jobs; and housing affordability. These four factors are combined in a spatial equilibrium model. An equilibrium spatial distribution of artists is derived from the model and is correlated with the actual distribution among Swedish municipalities. Subsequently, the model is used for an econometric estimation of factor effects. The results show that access to other artists and local access to service jobs are important localization factors. Educated labor used as a proxy for consumer demand has a significant effect on artists' location choices.

Keywords
Location choice; Artists; Clustering; Knowledge externalities
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23336 (URN)10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2013.09.008 (DOI)000342872400012 ()2-s2.0-84906942933 (Scopus ID)IHHEFSIS (Local ID)IHHEFSIS (Archive number)IHHEFSIS (OAI)
Note

Special Issue in Honor of John Quigley

Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Andersson, Å. E. (2013). Knowledge Accessibility, Economic Growth and the Haavelmo Paradox. In: Klaesson, Johan, Johansson, Börje, Karlsson, Charlie (Ed.), Metropolitan Regions: Knowledge Infrastructures of the Global Economy (pp. 73-90). New York: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge Accessibility, Economic Growth and the Haavelmo Paradox
2013 (English)In: Metropolitan Regions: Knowledge Infrastructures of the Global Economy / [ed] Klaesson, Johan, Johansson, Börje, Karlsson, Charlie, New York: Springer, 2013, p. 73-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Economic growth has conventionally been modelled for space-less economies. Econometrically, growth models have mostly been estimated on time series of national economies with minimal distinctions between economies as large as Japan or the USA and as small as the smallest economies of Asia and Europe. This approach to the analysis of economic growth is especially dangerous when the impact of scientific and technological knowledge is important for the process of growth. Creative activities and the formation of knowledge are highly clustered in space. Thus, the spatial distribution of accessibility to knowledge capital and investments determines economic growth of nations and other spatial aggregates.

The Haavelmo paradox contrasts chaos as the generic property of non-linear dynamic models with the fact that most statistics on macroeconomic growth processes tend towards persistent constant positive rates of growth. The paradox can be resolved if the non-linear dynamic model is subdivided into fast, private variables and very slow, public variables. Modelling spatial accessibility of knowledge as a slow, public variable and machinery and similar material capital as a relatively faster, private variable ensures stable growth, at least in the short and medium terms of the economic growth processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2013
Keywords
Dynamic economic processes. Infrastructure, Growth
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23340 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-32141-2_4 (DOI)978-3-642-32141-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2014-02-11Bibliographically approved
Emanuel Andersson, D. & Andersson, Å. E. (2013). The Economic Value of Experience Goods. In: Jon Sundbo , Flemming Sørensen (Ed.), Handbook on the Experience Economy: . Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Economic Value of Experience Goods
2013 (English)In: Handbook on the Experience Economy / [ed] Jon Sundbo , Flemming Sørensen, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013
Keywords
Experiences, economic value, consumption
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23339 (URN)978 1 78100 421 0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2014-02-12Bibliographically approved
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