Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Adolfsson, Margareta
Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Dreaver, J., Thompson, C., Girdler, S., Adolfsson, M., Black, M. H. & Falkmer, M. (2019). Success Factors Enabling Employment for Adults on the Autism Spectrum from Employers' Perspective. Journal of autism and developmental disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Success Factors Enabling Employment for Adults on the Autism Spectrum from Employers' Perspective
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Employment outcomes for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are poor and there is limited understanding on how best to support individuals with ASD in the workplace. Stakeholders involved in the employment of adults with ASD, including employers and employment service providers have unique insights into the factors influencing employment for this population. Organisational and individual factors facilitating successful employment for adults with ASD across Australia and Sweden were explored, including the supports and strategies underpinning employment success from an employers' perspective. Three themes including Knowledge and Understanding of ASD, Work Environment and Job Match emerged, suggesting that a holistic approach was key to supporting success, with employer knowledge and understanding of ASD underpinning their ability to facilitate employment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Autism, Competitive employment, Employment outcomes, Vocational support
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43360 (URN)10.1007/s10803-019-03923-3 (DOI)30771130 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061587562 (Scopus ID);HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-21
Adolfsson, M., Sjöman, M. & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). ICF-CY as a Framework for Understanding Child Engagement in Preschool. Frontiers in Education, 3, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICF-CY as a Framework for Understanding Child Engagement in Preschool
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Engagement in preschool predicts children's development, learning, and wellbeing in later school years. The time children engage in activities and social interactions is conditional for preschool inclusion. Engagement is part of the construct participation, which is determined by attendance and involvement. Two suggested underlying dimensions of engagement had been identified as essential when assessing children's participation in preschool activities. As engagement is a key question in inclusion of all children, and preschool becomes a common context for them, it is increasingly important to understand the concept of engagement in those settings. In Sweden most children attend preschool but children in need of special support tend not to receive enough support for their everyday functioning. This study aimed to conceptualize child engagement in preschool with ICF-CY as a framework to clarify core and developmental engagement dimensions included in Child Engagement Questionnaire (CEQ). The content of CEQ was identified through linking processes based on ICF linking rules with some exceptions. Specific challenges and solutions were acknowledged. To identify engagement dimensions in the ICF-CY, CEQ items related to ICF-CY chapters were integrated in the two-dimensional model of engagement. Findings showed that engagement measured for preschool ages was mostly related to Learning and Applying knowledge belonging to Activities and Participation but the linkage detected missing areas. Broader perspectives of children's everyday functioning require extended assessment with consideration to mutual influences between activities, participation, body functions, and contextual factors. Related to core and developmental engagement, findings highlight the importance for preschool staff to pay attention to how children do things, not only what they do. Activities related to core engagement include basic skills; those related to developmental engagement set higher demands on the child. Linking challenges related to preschool context were not consistent with those reported for child health. Using the ICF-CY as a framework with a common language may lead to open discussions among persons around the child, clarify the different perspectives and knowledges of the persons, and facilitate decisions on how to implement support to a child in everyday life situations in preschool and at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
children, core engagement, developmental engagement, ICF-CY, learning, participation, preschool, special support
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39833 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2018.00036 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Augustine, L., Lygnegård, F., Granlund, M. & Adolfsson, M. (2018). Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(19), 2293-2299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 19, p. 2293-2299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

  • Implications for rehabilitation
  • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

  • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

  • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

  • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Mental health, participation, linking rules, adolescents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35864 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1334238 (DOI)000440026500010 ()28573885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020216652 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, M., Johnson, E. & Nilsson, S. (2018). Pain management for children with cerebral palsy in school settings in two cultures: Action and reaction approaches. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(18), 2152-2162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain management for children with cerebral palsy in school settings in two cultures: Action and reaction approaches
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 18, p. 2152-2162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) face particular challenges, e.g. daily pain that threaten their participation in school activities. This study focuses on how teachers, personal assistants, and clinicians in two countries with different cultural prerequisites, Sweden and South Africa, manage the pain of children in school settings.

Method: Participants’ statements collected in focus groups were analysed using a directed qualitative content analysis framed by a Frequency of attendance-Intensity of involvement model, which was modified into a Knowing-Doing model.

Results: Findings indicated that pain management focused more on children’s attendance in the classroom than on their involvement, and a difference between countries in terms of action-versus-reaction approaches. Swedish participants reported action strategies to prevent pain whereas South African participants primarily discussed interventions when observing a child in pain.

Conclusion: Differences might be due to school- and healthcare systems. To provide effective support when children with CP are in pain in school settings, an action-and-reaction approach would be optimal and the use of alternative and augmentative communication strategies would help to communicate children’s pain. As prevention of pain is desired, structured surveillance and treatment programs are recommended along with trustful collaboration with parents and access to “hands-on” pain management when needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Intervention, involvement, participation, prevention, strategy
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35597 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1327987 (DOI)000437334400007 ()28521563 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019569130 (Scopus ID)HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-05-24 Created: 2017-05-24 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, M. (2017). ICF-CY in habilitation services for children. In: S. Castro & O. Palikara (Ed.), An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability (pp. 187-203). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICF-CY in habilitation services for children
2017 (English)In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 187-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Habilitation services is the name for interdisciplinary health care organisations in Sweden serving children and young people aged 0 to17 years with a wide range of disabilities categorised as mobility, behavioural, intellectual and multiple disabilities, their families and other networks. The construct of habilitation is used in childhood since it focuses on acquiring skills, whereas rehabilitation focuses on regaining lost skills. Despite this difference, the objective of services is consistent and the WHO definition of rehabilitation can apply to both: “A process aimed at enabling people with disabilities to reach and maintain their optimal physical, sensory, intellectual, psychological and social functional levels. Rehabilitation provides disabled people with the tools they need to attain independence and self-determination” (WHO, 2016). Habilitation teams include social, psychological, pedagogical and medical competencies with a marked preponderance of the latter (Figure 12.1).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39830 (URN)10.4324/9781315519692 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050277721 (Scopus ID)9781138698178 (ISBN)9781315519692 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-11-02Bibliographically approved
Deramore Denver, B., Adolfsson, M., Froude, E., Rosenbaum, P. & Imms, C. (2017). Methods for conceptualising ‘visual ability’ as a measurable construct in children with cerebral palsy. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 17(46)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methods for conceptualising ‘visual ability’ as a measurable construct in children with cerebral palsy
Show others...
2017 (English)In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 17, no 46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Vision influences functioning and disability of children with cerebral palsy, so there is a growing need for psychometrically robust tools to advance assessment of children’s vision abilities in clinical practice and research. Vision is a complex construct, and in the absence of clarity about this construct it is challenging to know whether valid, reliable measures exist. This study reports a method for conceptualising ‘visual ability’ as a measurable construct. Methods: Using the items from 19 assessment tools previously identified in a systematic review, this study used a two-phase process: first, deductive content analysis linked items to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Child and Youth version (ICF-CY), and second, vision-specific ‘Activity’-level items were explored using inductive thematic analysis. Results: The linking and content analysis identified that existing assessment tools are measuring vision across the ICF-CY domains of Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental and Personal Factors. Items specifically coded to vision at the Activity level were defined as measuring ‘how vision is used’, and these items form the basis of the conceptualisation that ‘visual ability’ is measurable as a single construct. The thematic analysis led to the identification of 3 categories containing 13 themes that reflect a child’s observable visual behaviours. Seven abilities reflect how a child uses vision: responds or reacts, initiates, maintains or sustains looking, changes or shifts looking, searches, locates or finds, and follows. Four interactions reflect the contexts in which a child uses their vision to purposefully interact: watches and visually interacts with people and faces, objects, over distance, and with hands. Finally, two themes reflect a child’s overall use of vision in daily activities: frequency of use, and efficiency of use. Conclusions: This study demonstrates an approach to exploring and explaining a complex topic utilising World Health Organization language and building on existing research. Despite the complexity of vision, the concept of ‘how vision is used’ can be clearly defined as a measurable construct at the Activity level of the ICF-CY. This study has identified observable visual behaviours that may be developed into items assessing how vision is used in daily activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
International classification, Systematic reviews, Health, Questionnaire, Disability, Impairment, ICF, Checklist, Vision
National Category
Occupational Therapy Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35345 (URN)10.1186/s12874-017-0316-6 (DOI)000397528400002 ()28320348 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015899459 (Scopus ID)HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Johnson, E. & Adolfsson, M. (2016). Professionals' perceptions about the need for pain management interventions for children with cerebral palsy in South African school settings. Pain Management Nursing, 17(4), 249-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professionals' perceptions about the need for pain management interventions for children with cerebral palsy in South African school settings
2016 (English)In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 249-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pain is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and may have negative consequences for children's success in their studies. Research has shown that pain in childhood negatively influences individuals' participation and quality of life in later years. This study investigated how professionals in South African school settings respond to children's need for pain management in an attempt to enable the children to be active participants in school activities, despite their pain. The study was descriptive and followed a qualitative design (i.e., focus group interviews with semistructured questions and a conventional content analysis). Five government schools for children with special education needs in South Africa's Gauteng province participated. Participants/Subjects: Thirty-eight professionals who represented eight professions. Professional statements on the topic were collected from five focus group sessions conducted during one week. Qualitative content analysis of the data was performed. Similar statements were combined, coded, and sorted into main categories and subcategories. The analysis identified three main categories for pain management: environmental, treatment, and support strategies. In addition, four groups of statements emerged on how contextual factors might affect pain in children with CP and their participation in school settings. It is important to train professionals in pain management and to implement structured models for pain prevention and management to ensure that best practices are adhered to for children with CP who suffer from acute or chronic pain.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31250 (URN)10.1016/j.pmn.2016.03.002 (DOI)27349380 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84977515796 (Scopus ID)HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Klang, N., Rowland, C., Fried-Oken, M., Steiner, S., Granlund, M. & Adolfsson, M. (2016). The content of goals in individual educational programs for students with complex communication needs. Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, 32(1), 41-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The content of goals in individual educational programs for students with complex communication needs
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to explore the contents of communication-related goals in individualized education programs (IEPs) for students with complex communication needs. Goals in 43 IEPs were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth version (ICFCY).

The results show that the communication-related IEP goals contain information on multiple domains of functioning in the ICF-CY. However, judging by the amount of codes linked to ICF-CY chapters, the IEPs contain a relatively small proportion of goals that focus on interaction with others, or participation in classroom and leisure activities. Special education teachers and speech-language pathologists working with students with complex communication needs may need support to formulate communicationrelated IEP goals with a focus on interaction and participation in school activities.

Keywords
Complex communication needs, individual educational program, ICF-CY, children, intervention goals, participation
National Category
Other Humanities Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28974 (URN)10.3109/07434618.2015.1134654 (DOI)000374854800004 ()26837187 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84957683264 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, M. & Simmeborn Fleischer, A. (2015). Applying the ICF to identify requirements for students with Asperger syndrome in higher education. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 18(3), 190-202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying the ICF to identify requirements for students with Asperger syndrome in higher education
2015 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 190-202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Higher education requires more than academic skills and everyday student-life can be stressful. Students with Asperger Syndrome (AS) may need support to manage their education due to difficulties in social functioning.

Objective: As preparation for the development of a structured tool to guide student and coordinator dialogues at Swedish universities, this study aimed to identify ICF categories that reflect requirements in everyday student-life for students with AS.

Methods: Using descriptive qualitative approach; information in documents reflecting the perspectives of university students; international classifications; user/health organisations and education authorities were linked to ICF codes.

Results: In total, 114 ICF categories were identified, most of which related to learning, tasks and demands, communication and interactions.

Conclusion: Students with AS need varying accommodations to be successful in higher education. In the future, ICF based code sets, including demands on student roles, can be used as checklists to describe functioning and needs for support.

Keywords
Asperger syndrome, Higher education, ICF, student, support, requirement
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22622 (URN)10.3109/17518423.2013.819947 (DOI)000354216600007 ()23957214 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929164650 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-27 Created: 2013-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Johnson, E., Nilsson, S. & Adolfsson, M. (2015). Eina! Ouch! Eish! Professionals’ perceptions of how children with cerebral palsy communicate about pain in South African school settings: Implications for the use of AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, 31(4), 325-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eina! Ouch! Eish! Professionals’ perceptions of how children with cerebral palsy communicate about pain in South African school settings: Implications for the use of AAC
2015 (English)In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 325-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most children with severe cerebral palsy experience daily pain that affects their school performance. School professionals need to assess pain in these children, who may also have communication difficulties, in order to pay attention to the pain and support the children’s continued participation in school. In this study, South African school professionals’ perceptions of how they observed pain in children with cerebral palsy, how they questioned them about it and how the children communicated their pain back to them were investigated. Thirty-eight school professionals participated in five focus groups. Their statements were categorized using qualitative content analysis. From the results it became clear that professionals observed children’s pain communication through their bodily expressions, behavioral changes, and verbal and non-verbal messages. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods were rarely used. The necessity of considering pain-related vocabulary in a multilingual South African context, and of advocating for the use of AAC strategies to enable children with cerebral palsy to communicate their pain was highlighted in this study.

Keywords
Augmentative and alternative communication, children with cerebral palsy, Complex communication needs, pain communication, school settings
National Category
Social Sciences Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28085 (URN)10.3109/07434618.2015.1084042 (DOI)000369709300005 ()26372118 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946493582 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications