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Björck-Åkesson, EvaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4492-2384
Publications (10 of 131) Show all publications
Pinto, A. I., Grande, C., Coelho, V., Castro, S., Granlund, M. & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings.. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings.
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This study aims to explore the role of three specific factors within the child-environment interaction process - engagement, independence and social interactions - in influencing development and learning of children with disabilities in inclusive preschool settings. The main question is whether children can be categorised in homogenous groups based on engagement, independence and social interactions (proximal variables within a biopsychosocial framework of human development). The study also examined whether children with the same diagnosis would group together or separately, when trying to identify clusters of engagement, independence and social interactions, and additionally whether such clusters vary as a function of individual child characteristics, and/or as a function of structural and process characteristics of preschool environment.

METHODS: Data was taken from an intervention study conducted in mainstream preschools in Portugal. A person-centered cluster analysis was conducted to explore group membership of children with various diagnoses, based on their engagement, independence and social interaction profiles.

RESULTS: Results show that children clustered based on similarity of engagement, independence and social interaction patterns, rather than on diagnosis. Besides, it was found that quality of peer interaction was the only predictor of cluster membership.

CONCLUSION: These findings support the argument that participation profiles may be more informative for intervention purposes than diagnostic categories, and that preschool process quality, namely peer interaction, is crucial for children's participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Engagement, functioning, independence, participation, social interactions
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42024 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2018.1526225 (DOI)30289341 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054523893 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2018-11-13
Adolfsson, M., Sjöman, M. & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). ICF-CY as a Framework for Understanding Child Engagement in Preschool. Frontiers in Education, 3, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICF-CY as a Framework for Understanding Child Engagement in Preschool
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Engagement in preschool predicts children's development, learning, and wellbeing in later school years. The time children engage in activities and social interactions is conditional for preschool inclusion. Engagement is part of the construct participation, which is determined by attendance and involvement. Two suggested underlying dimensions of engagement had been identified as essential when assessing children's participation in preschool activities. As engagement is a key question in inclusion of all children, and preschool becomes a common context for them, it is increasingly important to understand the concept of engagement in those settings. In Sweden most children attend preschool but children in need of special support tend not to receive enough support for their everyday functioning. This study aimed to conceptualize child engagement in preschool with ICF-CY as a framework to clarify core and developmental engagement dimensions included in Child Engagement Questionnaire (CEQ). The content of CEQ was identified through linking processes based on ICF linking rules with some exceptions. Specific challenges and solutions were acknowledged. To identify engagement dimensions in the ICF-CY, CEQ items related to ICF-CY chapters were integrated in the two-dimensional model of engagement. Findings showed that engagement measured for preschool ages was mostly related to Learning and Applying knowledge belonging to Activities and Participation but the linkage detected missing areas. Broader perspectives of children's everyday functioning require extended assessment with consideration to mutual influences between activities, participation, body functions, and contextual factors. Related to core and developmental engagement, findings highlight the importance for preschool staff to pay attention to how children do things, not only what they do. Activities related to core engagement include basic skills; those related to developmental engagement set higher demands on the child. Linking challenges related to preschool context were not consistent with those reported for child health. Using the ICF-CY as a framework with a common language may lead to open discussions among persons around the child, clarify the different perspectives and knowledges of the persons, and facilitate decisions on how to implement support to a child in everyday life situations in preschool and at home.

Keywords
children, core engagement, developmental engagement, ICF-CY, learning, participation, preschool, special support
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39833 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2018.00036 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). The ICF-CY and collaborative problem solving in inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care. In: S. Castro & O. Palikara (Ed.), An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability (pp. 134-146). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF-CY and collaborative problem solving in inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care
2018 (English)In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 134-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The wide-ranging educational, economic and social benefits of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC), at both individual and societal levels, are increasingly acknowledged in large parts of the world. Major changes in physical, socio-emotional and cognitive areas of development occur during these years, and meaningful educational experiences have been shown to have long-lasting effects upon a child’s cognitive development, socio-emotional development and learning (Pianta, Barnett, Burchinal, & Thornburg, 2009; Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000; Sylva, 2010). International and European communities (EU, 2011; OECD, 2014; UNESCO, 2015; UN, 2015) regard quality of ECEC as a foundation for later school achievement, success in the modern knowledge based economy and lifelong learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
ICF-CY, Disability, Early Childhood Education and Care
National Category
Educational Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38465 (URN)10.4324/9781315519692 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050299842 (Scopus ID)978-1-138-69817-8 (ISBN)978-1-315-51969-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Kyriazopoulou, M., Bartolo, P., Björck-Åkesson, E., Giné, C. & Bellour, F. (Eds.). (2017). Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment: New Insights and Tools - Contributions from a European Study. Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment: New Insights and Tools - Contributions from a European Study
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2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education, 2017. p. 58
Keywords
Inclusion, Early Childhood Education, Self-Reflection
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38496 (URN)978-87-7110-634-3 (ISBN)978-87-7110-633-6 (ISBN)
Projects
Inclusive Early Childhood Education
Available from: 2018-01-13 Created: 2018-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Björck-Åkesson, E., Kyriazopoulou, M., Giné, C. & Bartolo, P. (Eds.). (2017). Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment Self-Reflection Tool. Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment Self-Reflection Tool
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

From Introduction:

This Self-Reflection Tool was developed as part of the Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) project, conducted by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education from 2015 to 2017 (www.european-agency.org/agency-projects/inclusive-earlychildhood-education). The project’s overall goal was to identify, analyse and subsequently promote the main characteristics of quality IECE for all children. To that end, a need was detected for a tool that all professionals and staff could use to reflect on their setting’s inclusiveness, focusing on the social, learning and physical environment. This tool is intended to help improve settings’ inclusiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education, 2017. p. 27
Keywords
Inclusion, Early Childhood Education, Self-Reflection
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38466 (URN)978-87-7110-631-2 (ISBN)978-87-7110-632-9 (ISBN)
Projects
Inclusive Early Childhood Education
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Bartolo, P. A., Björck-Åkesson, E., Giné, C. & Kyriazopoulou, M. (2016). Ensuring a Strong Start for All Children: Inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care. In: Amanda Watkins,Cor Meijer (Ed.), Implementing Inclusive Education: Issues in Bridging the Policy-Practice Gap (pp. 19-35). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ensuring a Strong Start for All Children: Inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care
2016 (English)In: Implementing Inclusive Education: Issues in Bridging the Policy-Practice Gap / [ed] Amanda Watkins,Cor Meijer, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 19-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter highlights the importance of providing all children, and particularly those at risk, vulnerable children and children with disabilities, with opportunities for a quality inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC). It first sets out the evidence that quality inclusive ECEC provision is essential for all children to develop their potential and lifelong learning competencies that will ensure their successful participation in school and adult life. It then describes the main international and European policies for inclusive ECEC. A more detailed account is given of the five key principles for action towards improving the quality of ECEC provision developed by the thematic working group of the European Commission (2014) ‘Quality Framework for Early Education and Care’ that are also very similar to those proposed by the OECD (2015) ‘Starting Strong IV’. The concluding section underlines the need to address more strongly the provision of enabling opportunities for accessibility to ECEC of children at risk of exclusion. More importantly, it highlights the need to research and improve not only these children’s presence in ECEC but also their level and quality of active participation and engagement in the social and learning activities of early childhood inclusive provision. The chapter reflects the research and policy development work being undertaken by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education in its (2015–2017) project on Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) led by the present authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Series
International Perspectives on Inclusive Education, ISSN 1479-3636 ; 8
Keywords
Early childhood education and care, preschool, inclusion, quality, active participation, family partnership
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31447 (URN)10.1108/S1479-363620160000008003 (DOI)000404916500004 ()2-s2.0-84981523720 (Scopus ID)978-1-78635-388-7 (ISBN)978-1-78635-387-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Bartolo, P., Björck-Åkesson, E., Giné, C. & Kyriazopoulou, M. (Eds.). (2016). Inclusive Early Childhood Education: An analysis of 32 European examples. Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive Early Childhood Education: An analysis of 32 European examples
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Odense, Denmark: European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education, 2016. p. 71
Keywords
Inclusion, Early Childhood Education, Europe
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38467 (URN)978-87-7110-626-8 (ISBN)978-87-7110-627-5 (ISBN)
Projects
Inclusive Early Childhood Education
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Björck-Åkesson, E. & Granlund, M. (2015). Små barns hälsa och välbefinnande (1ed.). In: Ingrid Engdahl, Eva Ärlemalm-Hagsér (Ed.), Att bli förskollärare: Mångfacetterad komplexitet (pp. 73-78). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Små barns hälsa och välbefinnande
2015 (Swedish)In: Att bli förskollärare: Mångfacetterad komplexitet / [ed] Ingrid Engdahl, Eva Ärlemalm-Hagsér, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 1, p. 73-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2015 Edition: 1
National Category
Humanities Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26329 (URN)978-91-47-09962-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2016-03-03Bibliographically approved
Simeonsson, R. J., Lollar, D., Björck-Åkesson, E., Granlund, M., Brown, S. C., Zhuoying, Q., . . . Pan, Y. (2014). ICF and ICF-CY lessons learned: Pandora’s box of personal factors. Disability and Rehabilitation, 36(25), 2187-2194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICF and ICF-CY lessons learned: Pandora’s box of personal factors
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2014 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 25, p. 2187-2194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this article is to examine the component of “personal factors” described as a contextual factor in the ICF and ICF-CY.

Methods: A critical examination of the construct of “personal factors” and description of the component was made with reference to conceptual and taxonomic criteria.

Results: The “personal factors” component in the ICF/ICF-CY is not defined, there is no taxonomy of codes, there is no explicit purpose stated for its use and no guidelines are provided for its application. In spite of these constraints, the component of “personal factors” is being applied as part of the classifications. Such uncontrolled applications constitute significant risks for the status of ICF/ICF-CY as the WHO reference classification in that: (a) the component is accepted for use by default simply by being applied; (b) component content is expanded with idiosyncratic exemplars by users; and (c) there is potential misuse of “personal factors” in documenting personal attributes, including “blaming the victim”.

Conclusion: In the absence of formal codes, any application of the component of “personal factors” lacks the legitimacy that documentation with a scientific taxonomy should provide. Given the growing use of the ICF/ICF-CY globally, a priority for the revision process should be to determine if there is in fact need for “personal” or any other factors in the ICF/ICF-CY.

Keywords
classification, ICF, ICF-CY, personal factors
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23172 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.892638 (DOI)000346060300010 ()24601863 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84916605827 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, M., Björck-Åkesson, E. & Lim, C.-I. (2013). Code sets for everyday life situations of children aged 0-6: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play - a study based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76(3), 127-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Code sets for everyday life situations of children aged 0-6: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play - a study based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth
2013 (English)In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [fi]

Introduction: The complexity of the Child and Youth version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, the ICF-CY, is a challenge for occupational therapists and other professionals in clinical work. Code sets including only essential categories help to make it more user-friendly. Thus far, code sets have been developed to reflect functioning for children in different developmental periods. However, there are no code sets that support screening of participation in everyday life situations and can be used across diagnoses. This exploratory study is the first attempt to develop code sets for preschoolers’ (age 0-6 years) everyday life situations.

Method: Using sequential Delphi processes with expert panels consisting of 35 professionals in five interdisciplinary early intervention teams and six parents of children, the study identified content in three code sets: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play.

Results: A limited number of relevant categories were identified for three code sets: Sleeping (12), Mealtimes (21) and Play (30). Findings suggested a professional focus on Environmental factors compared with a parental focus on Body functions.

Conclusion: It is important to consider the opinions of all involved when developing code sets to provide a common framework for screening of children’s everyday functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The College of Occupational Therapists Ltd., 2013
Keywords
Children, ICF-CY, code sets
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20853 (URN)10.4276/030802213X13627524435144 (DOI)000316505900003 ()HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2013-03-17 Created: 2013-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4492-2384

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