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Publications (10 of 77) Show all publications
Avery, H., Wihlborg, M., Almualm, Y., Almahfali, M. S. & Christou, F. (2019). Access to health in emergency contexts: New models of international curriculum development to address global challenges. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2019, Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2-6 September 2019, Hamburg, Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Access to health in emergency contexts: New models of international curriculum development to address global challenges
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47269 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2019, Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2-6 September 2019, Hamburg, Germany
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Avery, H. (2019). Acquérir les gestes qu’il faut: les mathématiques scolaires comme interaction et savoir-faire. In: AREF 2019: Livret des résumés. Paper presented at Congrès international de l'AREF, Bordeaux, France, 3-5 juillet 2019 (pp. 286-287).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acquérir les gestes qu’il faut: les mathématiques scolaires comme interaction et savoir-faire
2019 (French)In: AREF 2019: Livret des résumés, 2019, p. 286-287Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper presents the synthesis of a series of studies on support measures for pupils with additional languages in Sweden, with a particular focus on the consequences of language support measures for teaching and learning school mathematics. The analysis identifies several critical aspects in mathematics teaching when the pupils transition from one school system to another, and particularly when they do not yet have a shared language to communicate among each other or with their teachers. Three aspects with relevance to language support will be discussed and illustrated with examples from the studies: the notion of mathematics as a formal language; the notion of levels and absolute progression in mathematics; the notion that learning mathematics means understanding "concepts".

Keywords
mathematics didactics, language and cognition, Language and learning, newly arrived students
National Category
Didactics Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47263 (URN)
Conference
Congrès international de l'AREF, Bordeaux, France, 3-5 juillet 2019
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Avery, H. & Halimeh, N. (2019). Crafting futures in Lebanese refugee camps: The case of Burj El Barajneh Palestinian camp. FORMakademisk, 12(2), Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crafting futures in Lebanese refugee camps: The case of Burj El Barajneh Palestinian camp
2019 (English)In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The initiative at the Burj El Barajneh camp is run by a network of local associations and aims at improving living conditions, services, infrastructure and livelihoods for the inhabitants. Burj El Barajneh has a large number of active associations and many highly educated professionals. However, in this complex hyperdense context, any kind of change needs to be carefully considered; there are no simple recipes, and existing professional expertise does not necessarily match the specific conditions of the locality. By working with collective design and collaboration between the camp's inhabitants, it becomes possible to envisage larger coordinated efforts and to solve issues that remain blocked at an individual level. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Assosiation FormAkademisk, 2019
Keywords
Architecture, Refugee camps, Research, Social environment, Sustainable models, Systemic design
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47260 (URN)10.7577/formakademisk.2696 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073370824 (Scopus ID)POA HLK 2019;HLKLPSIS (Local ID)POA HLK 2019;HLKLPSIS (Archive number)POA HLK 2019;HLKLPSIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Avery, H. (2019). De la nation-foyer à la nation-forteresse: quelles implications pour l’éducation des réfugiés en Suède?. In: AREF 2019: Livret des résumés. Paper presented at Congrès international de l'AREF, Bordeaux, France, 3-5 juillet 2019 (pp. 209-210).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>De la nation-foyer à la nation-forteresse: quelles implications pour l’éducation des réfugiés en Suède?
2019 (French)In: AREF 2019: Livret des résumés, 2019, p. 209-210Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The tensions between tendencies to support and reject that can be observed in reception measures for newly-arrived students in Sweden are a consequence both of the general climate of hostility towards immigration in Europe, and features particular to Sweden. The paper summarises the historical background to the present situation, from the 1960s onwards, and points to some of the impacts for teachers and for civil society. The analysis will above all focus on three diverging but parallell trends and which overlap: dynamics of integration, dynamics of competition and social segregation; dynamics of 'securitisation'. These dynamics evolve within different conceptualisations of education, but also relate to social developments and conflicting visions for society as a whole.

Keywords
refugee education, refugee reception, Sweden, securitisation
National Category
Educational Sciences International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47265 (URN)
Conference
Congrès international de l'AREF, Bordeaux, France, 3-5 juillet 2019
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hammarsten, M., Askerlund, P., Almers, E., Avery, H. & Samuelsson, T. (2019). Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 19(3), 227-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 227-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, cities become more dense, green spaces disappear and children spend less time outdoors. Research suggests that these conditions create health problems and lack of ecological literacy. To reverse such trends, localities are creating urban green spaces for children to visit during school time. Drawing on ideas in ecological literacy, this study investigates school children’s perspectives on a forest garden, a type of outdoor educational setting previously only scarcely researched. Data were collected through walk-and-talk conversations and informal interviews with 28 children aged 7 to 9. Many children in the study expressed strong positive feelings about the forest garden, the organized and spontaneous activities there, and caring for the organisms living there. We observed three aspects of learning in the data, potentially beneficial for the development of children’s ecological literacy: practical competence, learning how to co-exist and care, and biological knowledge and ecological understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
forest garden; social Studies of childhood; children’s perspectives; walk-and-talk conversations; ecological literacy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41474 (URN)10.1080/14729679.2018.1517371 (DOI)000470670800004 ()2-s2.0-85053503238 (Scopus ID)HOA HLK 2019 (Local ID)HOA HLK 2019 (Archive number)HOA HLK 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Avery, H. (2019). How to manage change creatively: unravelling the conundrum of business-state relations. In: : . Paper presented at Gulf Research Meeting 2019 - King's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 15-18 July, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to manage change creatively: unravelling the conundrum of business-state relations
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Numerous vulnerabilities have been noted in the current structures of the Gulf economies, including dependency on hydrocarbon exports, the need for fiscal reforms and alternative sources of state revenue, as well as limited incentives in the status-quo for initiative and productive activities. However, diversification, business development and transition away from hydrocarbon dependency require the capacity to make informed and strategic long-term choices, based on not only on existing strengths and competitive advantages within the current global landscape, but taking into account foreseeable needs and future developments. These include both regional or domestic developments and the likelihood of major shocks in global economic landscapes. It has been observed that major restructuring of economies was made possible historically through state intervention (Wade, 2004). States clearly have a privileged position for enabling change, since they can provide necessary infrastructure and create a stable climate that supports investment, allowing businesses to operate with a minimum of risk. Clear and credible visions for the future are a vital condition for long term investments in the domestic economies, while excessive regulations, clientelism and the fear of political upheavals can act as deterrents. In the case of the Gulf states, the question is thus how to develop wise policies and mechanisms, by identifying critical points of leverage rather than using blanket measures.To avoid defensive reactions or flight of capital and capacity, visions for domestic development need to generate confidence and trust, giving sufficient attention to mechanisms of enabling change that simultaneously permit a smooth phasing out of dysfunctional structures. Major challenges observed today include the demographic profile of the countries, expectations as well as the mismatch between existing skills of the labour force and the capacity needed for restructuring the economies. Maintaining a social contract will therefore continue to depend on measures of distribution and ensuring employment for young people in the region, while at the same time orienting the economy towards new types of production.The paper will consider possible pathways towards economic sustainability in the Gulf states drawing on systems and transition theory (Geels, 2005; Twomey & Gaziulusoy, 2014). In the context of the Gulf, it has been argued that conventional distinctions between private and public sectors can be misleading, to the extent that public actors can be stakeholders in the economy. In the analysis, emphasis will therefore be on implications of policy choices for the real economy and future capacity, rather than on public versus private ownership. The analysis will further outline the heterogeneity of the economic fabric and discuss both synergies and conflicts of interest between different sectors and industries.

National Category
Economics and Business Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47262 (URN)
Conference
Gulf Research Meeting 2019 - King's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 15-18 July, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Bodin, E. & Avery, H. (2019). Navigating in multidisciplinary learning environments at doctoral level and beyond. In: Postgraduate Supervision Conference: The global scholar: Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision, 26-29 March 2019: Paper abstracts. Paper presented at Postgraduate Supervision Conference, The global scholar: Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision, 26-29 March 2019, Stellenbosch, South Africa (pp. 15-16).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Navigating in multidisciplinary learning environments at doctoral level and beyond
2019 (English)In: Postgraduate Supervision Conference: The global scholar: Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision, 26-29 March 2019: Paper abstracts, 2019, p. 15-16Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cross-disciplinary research has become a political concern for addressing global challenges (Kessel and Rosenfield 2008). However, cross-disciplinary research is no easy road as it generally coupled with resistance from traditional disciplinary university structures, difficulties with collaborating across the disciplines, and national policies drawing in different directions (Turner et al. 2015). Still, interdisciplinary graduate programmes are globally widespread, and much of the politically requested research is carried out by doctoral students and post docs – who face the same challenges as cross-disciplinary researchers do in general (Boden et al. 2011; Felt et al. 2013). At the same time, research on junior scholars’ learning in multidisciplinary environments is scarce (Holley 2015), and explicit guidelines for cross-disciplinary research supervision are still missing although a few exceptions exist (Manathunga et al. 2006). Against this background, the purpose of the current conference contribution is three-fold:Firstly, we will provide a conceptual framework for how the concepts of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, and cross-disciplinary can be understood and distinguished from each other. Secondly, we will present some findings from our recent study on cross-disciplinary collaboration and scholarly independence among doctoral students and post docs in two multidisciplinary learning environments at a Swedish university. Data was collected through interviews with leaders, supervisors, doctoral students, and post docs (n=26), and cross-case synthesis (Yin 2014) was used for analysing data. Underpinned by the theoretical notions of ‘epistemic living space’ (Felt et al. 2013) and ‘developmental networks’ (Baker and Lattuca 2010), our analysis revealed how the actors’ engagement in the environments was dependent on their positions in time and space. Thirdly, based on our empirical findings and existing literature within the field, we will outline a theoretical framework for developing cross-disciplinary research supervision and suggest a pedagogy that supports not only doctoral students but post docs as well, as they generally also need support (Scaffidi and Berman 2011). In line with other studies, our conclusions point to the benefits of learning from peers in multidisciplinary settings (e.g. Baker and Lattuca 2010; Boden et al. 2011). Yet the need for qualified supervision may not be underestimated – which implies certain challenges in multidisciplinary environments.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47261 (URN)
Conference
Postgraduate Supervision Conference, The global scholar: Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision, 26-29 March 2019, Stellenbosch, South Africa
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Nordén, B., Avery, H., Harju, A. & Åkerblom, A. (2019). Practices in development: How is meaning, context and motivation created for learning for sustainability in the preschool's educational outdoor activities?. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2019, Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2-6 September 2019, Hamburg, Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practices in development: How is meaning, context and motivation created for learning for sustainability in the preschool's educational outdoor activities?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47267 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2019, Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2-6 September 2019, Hamburg, Germany
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mourad, K. A. & Avery, H. (2019). The sustainability of post-conflict development: The case of Algeria. Sustainability, 11(11), Article ID 3036.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The sustainability of post-conflict development: The case of Algeria
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 3036Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Algerian civil war, 1992-2002, affected all aspects of life in the country. Major development efforts were therefore initiated in the post-conflict era. Almost 20 years later, the economy remains fragile, and the country's large hydrocarbon revenues have not been used to develop the infrastructure for sustainability, support energy transition or reduce structural vulnerabilities. This paper provides an overview of Algerian development strategies before and after the conflict, examining in particular the orientation of major development projects involving foreign financing. Two rural development programmes are described to illustrate the outcomes of such projects. The results show that the conflict stopped or hindered many ongoing and planned development projects in the country, especially in the agriculture sector, while new investments in industry started after the conflict. The review of individual development projects further revealed that many projects between 1980-2017 had doubtful benefits with respect to long-term development goals. Initiatives tended to be discontinued once the funding period closed, and the involvement of the private sector was low. It is therefore concluded that additional attention needs to be devoted to long-term and structural impacts of development projects, including considerations regarding sustainability, demographics, and climate-related future changes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Development strategies, Hydrocarbon dependency, Long-term goals, MENA region, Post-conflict recovery, Rural development projects, Sustainability transitions, development project, development strategy, hydrocarbon, private sector, rural development, sustainability, Algeria
National Category
Environmental Sciences Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47259 (URN)10.3390/su11113036 (DOI)000472632200041 ()2-s2.0-85067265166 (Scopus ID)GOA HLK 2019 (Local ID)GOA HLK 2019 (Archive number)GOA HLK 2019 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasThe Middle East in the Contemporary World
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Nordén, B. & Avery, H. (2019). Transitions towards an unknown future: Non-formal learning in transnational communities for a sustainable society. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019, Education in a Globalized World, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitions towards an unknown future: Non-formal learning in transnational communities for a sustainable society
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The study makes an inventory of learning opportunities young people were offered in connection with CEI 2016, one of the annual international conferences organized by the NGO named Caretakers of the Environment International (CEI), which year 2016 took place in Aalborg in Denmark. The learning opportunities offered by this transnational learning community are discussed in relation to some essential learning qualities to meet the comprehensive sustainability challenges facing our societies - in particular youth, who can be seen as a target group per se, many times in transition-like situations: (1) learning for uncertain future, 82) dealing with complex crossborder issues, (3) ability to collaborate, (4) take initiative and act in society. These qualities are difficult to achieve in formal school systems that are essentially organized to ensure the transmission of a specific learning content and measurable abilities. The question in this study has been inspired by a previous study in a Swedish school context (Nordén, Avery & Anderberg, 2012, Nordén, 2016), about abilities that allow high school students to get an agency towards local and global sustainability challenges. The critical skills identified were: (1) Organization/self-regulation and independent decision-making skills (2) Development of Transnational Learning Communities (3) Democratic cooperation in action. There is widespread consensus that radical new educational approaches are needed to address the challenges of our time (Breiting & Wickenberg, 2010; Mochizuki & Yarime, 2016; Reid & Scott, 2013). Traditionally, focus has been placed on transmitting an existing knowledge base. The situations we face are changing at a staggering rate, and future developments are characterized by great uncertainty. Barnett (2012) therefore claims that preparation for the unknown should be guiding in education. Young people must not only be able to explore different complex situations, but also be prepared to take initiatives to act, find solutions to major environmental and social problems, and steer up their own learning during their life journey (Almers, 2013; Barrat, Barratt-Hacking, Scott & Talbot, 2006; Öhman, 2008). In this context, one has talked about sustainability literacy (Dawe, Jucker & Martin, 2005). CEI's activities are nonformal (Mocker & Spear, 1982) in the sense that they are organized for the purpose of promoting learning for sustainability and have a well-considered overall structure, but participants can independently define the issues and projects they work with . The transnational learning community could thereby support a challenge-oriented learning (UE4SD, 2015). The results indicate that the processes are supported when young people and their teachers experience a sense of community and having a place in the local-global context. This is done both through intensive work on their own projects prior to the conference, through participation in the physical meetings during the conference and the subsequent network activities in connection with it. In order for society as a whole to take advantage of the potential of non-formal learning, alternative educational approaches need to gain increased recognition and attention. The focus has to be shifted from a narrow performance focus that values isolated results, to reflect more widely on the learning opportunities offered by different forms of education in their entirety.

Keywords
Global Learning for Sustainable Development (GLSD), global challenges, informal learning, refugee education
National Category
Educational Sciences Environmental Sciences International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47268 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, Education in a Globalized World, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8423-1938

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