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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Berglez, P. (2019). Den globala journalistiken (2ed.). In: Michael Karlsson & Jesper Strömbäck (Ed.), Handbok i journalistikforskning: (pp. 433-446). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den globala journalistiken
2019 (Swedish)In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Michael Karlsson & Jesper Strömbäck, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 2, p. 433-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019 Edition: 2
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45857 (URN)9789144124636 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P. & Lidskog, R. (2019). Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media’s coverage of wildfires in three continents. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, 13(3), 381-394
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media’s coverage of wildfires in three continents
2019 (English)In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region, and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analysed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Wildfires, climate change, media, news values, culture, framing
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38111 (URN)10.1080/17524032.2017.1397040 (DOI)000462242000009 ()2-s2.0-85038026905 (Scopus ID)PP HLK 2019 embargo 12 (Local ID)PP HLK 2019 embargo 12 (Archive number)PP HLK 2019 embargo 12 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P. & Olausson, U. (2019). Global journalism. In: Tim P. Vos & Folker Hanusch (Ed.), The international encyclopedia of journalism studies: . Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global journalism
2019 (English)In: The international encyclopedia of journalism studies / [ed] Tim P. Vos & Folker Hanusch, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Global journalism appears to become increasingly important in the field of journalism studies, however, there is no agreement about how it should be applied in research. This entry presents four perspectives: the global-mapping perspective, which is concerned with mapping and analyzing how journalism works in different parts of the world; the media-technology perspective, which focuses on the potential of cross-border media technology to facilitate the creation of a global public sphere; the ethics perspective, which deals with how journalism should approach other cultures in order to reduce the distance between "us" and "them" and minimize stereotypical depictions of the Other; and the discourse perspective, which associates global journalism with reporting that sheds light on the multitude of cross-border interdependencies between people, processes, and events. The entry also discusses the positions of "globalists" and "skeptics" in the media globalization debate and the role of journalism education in the development of global journalism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Series
The Wiley Blackwell-ICA international encyclopedias of communication
Keywords
global media, global public sphere, journalism, media globalization, transnational journalism, transnational media
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43772 (URN)10.1002/9781118841570.iejs0175 (DOI)9781118841679 (ISBN)9781118841570 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Al-Saqaf, W. & Berglez, P. (2019). How Do Social Media Users Link Different Types of Extreme Events to Climate Change?: A Study of Twitter During 2008–2017. Journal of Extreme Events, 6(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Do Social Media Users Link Different Types of Extreme Events to Climate Change?: A Study of Twitter During 2008–2017
2019 (English)In: Journal of Extreme Events, ISSN 2345-7376, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how three types of extreme events (heat waves, droughts, floods) are mentioned together with climate change on social media. English-language Twitter use during 2008–2017 is analyzed, based on 1,127,996 tweets (including retweets). Frequencies and spikes of activity are compared and theoretically interpreted as reflecting complex relations between the extreme event factor (the occurrence of an extreme event); the media ecology factor (climate-change oriented statements/actions in the overall media landscape) and the digital action factor (activities on Twitter). Flooding was found to be by far the most tweeted of the three in connection to climate change, followed by droughts and heat waves. It also led when comparing spikes of activity. The dominance of floods is highly prevalent from 2014 onwards, triggered by flooding events (extreme event factor), the climate science controversy in US politics (media ecology factor) and the viral power of celebrities’ tweets (digital action factor).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2019
Keywords
Extreme events, climate change, heat waves, droughts, floods, Twitter, social media
National Category
Media Studies Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45936 (URN)10.1142/S2345737619500027 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P. (2019). Kritisk diskursanalys (3ed.). In: M. Ekström & B. Johansson (Ed.), Metoder i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap: (pp. 225-254). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kritisk diskursanalys
2019 (Swedish)In: Metoder i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap / [ed] M. Ekström & B. Johansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 3, p. 225-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019 Edition: 3
Keywords
medier, kommunikation, diskurs, diskursanalys, kritik, ideologi, kritisk diskursanalys
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42781 (URN)978-91-44-12570-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Ots, M., Berglez, P. & Olausson, U. (2019). Sustainable news media: Organizational reconciliation of economic, democratic, and environmental challenges in media firms. In: : . Paper presented at 6th RME Research Conference, 1-3 oct 2019 Jönköping.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable news media: Organizational reconciliation of economic, democratic, and environmental challenges in media firms
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we explore the role of media industries in the realization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development. Based on prior research on media industries, the paper starts by outlining the established view of this complex business context and its contradictory objectives. We then systematize this in a tentative framework of media business objectives in relation to the Agenda 2030 goals, and finally propose a research agenda. In future versions of this paper we will complement this framework with case study data on Sustainable Management Practices at the largest Nordic media houses. This entails how managers understand and interpret the meaning of sustainability in the media context and media’s role for agenda 2030, but also how they operationalize and organize this in business practices.

National Category
Media and Communications Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46409 (URN)
Conference
6th RME Research Conference, 1-3 oct 2019 Jönköping
Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2019-10-01
Gearing, A. & Berglez, P. (2019). The microcosm of global investigative journalism: Understanding cross-border connections beyond the ICIJ. Journal of Applied Journalism and Media Studies, 8(2), 211-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The microcosm of global investigative journalism: Understanding cross-border connections beyond the ICIJ
2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Journalism and Media Studies, ISSN 2001-0818, E-ISSN 2049-9531, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Investigative journalism across national borders is well known for the large projects, initiated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), with hundreds of reporters in many countries who collaborate to produce coverage such as the Panama Papers. However, there are also many examples in the field of global investigative journalism that are microcosms of their larger counterparts. These smaller or ‘microcosm’ cross-border collaborations are instigated and carried out by a small group of reporters, possibly including freelance reporters. Like their larger counterparts, ‘microcosm investigations’ can also lead to sociopolitical change and thus are deservedly classified as investigative journalism. Microcosm investigations can therefore be viewed as part of a suggested global fourth estate that is calling power to account. The purpose of the article is to examine the characteristics of ‘microcosm’-oriented global investigative journalism and to demonstrate the similarities and differences compared with its larger and more visible counterpart. The empirical material consists of interviews with Australian journalists who were shortlisted as finalists and who won national journalism awards, sponsored by the Walkley Foundation. The findings indicate that new technologies that enable cross-border collaboration are enabling the emergence of a global fourth estate. In the concluding discussion it is argued that for the expansion and mainstreaming of global investigative journalism, the multiple small-scale projects undertaken should collectively be viewed as equally important, if not more important, than the fewer but larger and better-known collaborations. Microcosm collaborations offer opportunities for the proliferation of cross-border media coverage that can be accomplished even by relatively small media outlets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
cross-border collaboration; global fourth estate; global investigative journalism; global journalism; global network journalism; journalism
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45510 (URN)10.1386/ajms.8.2.211_1 (DOI)000474392600005 ()2-s2.0-85073370875 (Scopus ID);HLKMKVIS (Local ID);HLKMKVIS (Archive number);HLKMKVIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Konow-Lund, M., Gearing, A. & Berglez, P. (2019). Transnational cooperation in journalism. In: Oxford research encyclopedia of communication: . Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transnational cooperation in journalism
2019 (English)In: Oxford research encyclopedia of communication, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The journalism industry has used technology and cooperation to convey information around the world since the mid-1800s when six American newspapers aligned to form the Associated Press. The nonprofit news agency was a business collaboration that allowed members to share content with one another. Cooperation in journalism was not always compatible with the industry’s traditional business model, however, which valued exclusivity. As technology progressed, cooperation grew ever easier and more productive. The ultimate emergence of the internet has consummated this trend, facilitating collaborations among groups of reporters across the globe. These collaborations allow individual groups to retain and capitalize upon their geographical exclusivity while enhancing their collective ability to provide domestic stories with a transnational context or to cover cross-border or even global issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
transnational cooperation in journalism, investigative journalism, journalistic practice, technology, organization of collaboration, diffusion of network newsroom, tax haven leaks, global journalism, journalism studies
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45509 (URN)10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.881 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P. (2018). Smileys Without Borders: A Critique of Transboundary Interaction Between Politicians, Journalists and PR practitioners on Social Media. TripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, 16(1), 18-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smileys Without Borders: A Critique of Transboundary Interaction Between Politicians, Journalists and PR practitioners on Social Media
2018 (English)In: TripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 18-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to contribute a critical theoretical understanding of cross-professional relations on social media, focusing on politicians, journalists and PR practitioners. It is well known that these professional groups establish personal and close relations in offline contexts, but more attention needs to be paid to the role of social media. Here, it is argued that in the context of digital media use, semi-private chatting, humour, and mutual acknowledgment, including the use of likes, smileys, heart symbols, etc., are evidence of a ‘neoliberalisation’ of cross-professional relations. The underlying idea is that the common practice of self-branding undermines representations of professional belonging and exacerbates the blurring of professional boundaries. The critical conceptualisation of such ‘transboundary’ interaction between politicians, journalists and PR practitioners, which is guided by a culturalmaterialist approach, includes the presentation of examples deriving from the Swedish Twittersphere, and suggestions for empirical research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TripleC, 2018
Keywords
Politicians, Journalists, PR Practitioners, Social Media, Cross-Professional Relations, Twitter, Transboundary Interaction, Critical Theory, Neoliberalized Logics, Individualization, Flexibilization, Churnalism
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38453 (URN)000424089500002 ()2-s2.0-85041741668 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P. & Gearing, A. (2018). The Panama and Paradise Papers. The Rise of a Global Fourth Estate. International Journal of Communication, 12, 4573-4592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Panama and Paradise Papers. The Rise of a Global Fourth Estate
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 12, p. 4573-4592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article theorizes the work of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). This work is motivated by the need to link recent large-scale ICIJ projects such as the Panama and Paradise Papers revelations to ongoing theoretical discussions about emergent forms of journalism. It is argued that the ICIJ provides evidence of the emergence of a “global network journalism” characterized by a particular epistemology (a global outlook on social reality) that is embedded in a networked rationale. It is further suggested that this journalistic practice paves the way for the media’s role as a global fourth estate, responding to the budding demand for a new type of reporting that influences political decisions and expressing society’s development toward an internalized sense of globalization. We discuss the usefulness of applying the presented concepts to other cases than the ICIJ and provide suggestions for further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USC Annenberg Press, 2018
Keywords
ICIJ, global network journalism, network journalism, global journalism, global fourth estate, networked fourth estate, Tax Havens Investigation, Luxembourg Leaks, Panama Papers, Paradise Papers
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41995 (URN)000457602100159 ()HLKMKVIS (Local ID)HLKMKVIS (Archive number)HLKMKVIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3607-7881

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