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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Larsen, L. B., Ramstrand, N. & Tranberg, R. (2019). Duty belt or load-bearing vest? Discomfort and pressure distribution for police driving standard fleet vehicles. Applied Ergonomics, 80, 146-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Duty belt or load-bearing vest? Discomfort and pressure distribution for police driving standard fleet vehicles
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 80, p. 146-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Police working in active duty have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, with lower back pain being the most frequently reported. As a part of uniform regulations, Swedish police are mandated to wear body armour and duty belts at all times during work. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different load carriage designs on in-vehicle sitting pressure and self-rated discomfort among police. Results showed less discomfort when wearing the alternate load carriage system incorporating a load-bearing vest and thigh holster compared to the standard load carriage system consisting of a duty belt. Pressures in the lower back were reduced when wearing the load-bearing vest whereas pressures in the upper back region increased. Relocating appointments away from the waist has the potential to improve sitting positions and the ergonomic situation for police when driving fleet vehicles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Driving, Law enforcement, Lower back, Occupational health, Protective equipment
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39059 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2019.05.017 (DOI)000477687200017 ()31280798 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066295219 (Scopus ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 24 (Local ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 24 (Archive number)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 24 (OAI)
Note

Included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Ramstrand, N., Gjøvaag, T., Starholm, I. M. & Rusaw, D. (2019). Effects of knee orthoses on kinesthetic awareness and balance in healthy individuals.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of knee orthoses on kinesthetic awareness and balance in healthy individuals
2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Conflicting evidence exists regarding the effects of knee orthoses on proprioception. One belief is that pressure applied by orthoses heightens kinesthetic awareness and that this affects balance. This study aimed to investigate effects of two different orthosis designs on kinesthetic awareness and balance in healthy individuals.

Methods: Twenty individuals (13 women) participated in this case series study. Each were tested wearing 1/no orthosis, 2/soft elastic orthosis and 3/non-elastic jointed orthosis. Pressure under orthoses was recorded. Kinesthetic awareness was investigated by testing Joint Position Sense (JPS) and Threshold to Detection of Passive Motion (TDPM). Balance was tested using a Modified Sensory Organization Test (mSOT).

Results: Non-elastic jointed orthoses applied the greatest pressure to the knee. With non-elastic jointed orthoses, TDPM was significantly poorer for pooled results (p= 0.02) and when the start position of the knee was 70 degrees (mean threshold = 0.6 º, 0.6 º, 0.7º for no-orthosis, elastic and jointed-orthoses; p= 0.03). No major differences were observed in JPS or balance and correlation between proprioception and balance was poor.

Conclusions: There may be a limit to the amount of pressure that should be applied to the knee joint by an orthosis. Exceeding this limit may compromise kinesthetic awareness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Orthotics, joint position sense, detection of passive motion, proprioception, knee brace
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43599 (URN);HHJCHILDIS,HHJADULTIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS,HHJADULTIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS,HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-07
Sterner, A., Hagiwara, M. A., Ramstrand, N. & Palmér, L. (2019). Factors developing nursing students and novice nurses´ ability to provide care in acute situations. Nurse Education in Practice, 35, 135-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors developing nursing students and novice nurses´ ability to provide care in acute situations
2019 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 35, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nurses play an important role in detecting, interpreting and deciding appropriate actions to take in order to care for patients in acute situations. Nevertheless, novice nurses are reported as feeling unprepared to provide appropriate care in acute situations. In order to address this issue, it is important to describe factors in nursing education and first year of practice that enable nurses to provide appropriate care in acute situations. 17 novice nurses were interviewed in this qualitative study. A phenomenographic analysis was applied and four categories were discovered: Integrating theory into practice, access to adequate support, experience-based knowledge and personality traits. Results suggest that a variety of factors contribute to novice nurses’ ability to provide appropriate care in acute situations. Experience of acute situations and the integration of theory and practice are pivotal in acquiring skills to provide appropriate care. To accomplish this, reflection, practice and/or applied training with a patient perspective is recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Acute care, Novice nurse, Nursing education, Simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43390 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2019.02.005 (DOI)000465053200021 ()30818117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062686089 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Larsen, L. B., Ramstrand, N. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 47(3), 318-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

Police have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. While physical factors contributing to this have been explored, little is known regarding the contribution of the psychosocial work environment. This study explores the association between elements of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among Swedish police.

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, response from 4185 police were collected using a self-administered online survey. The survey included questions on psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal pain, as well as several potential confounding factors. Binominal regression analyses were performed to explore the degree of association between 1) the indices for job demands, job control, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain and 2) the four categories of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain.

Results

The overall psychosocial work environment of Swedish police was characterised by low control and high social support. Police who reported active and high strain jobs were found to have an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.08-1.94), and 1.84 (1.51-2.24) respectively). High demands, which is a component in the categories for active and high strain jobs, was also found to be associated with an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.66 (1.45-1.91)). High social support was associated with a decrease in the odds ratio formulti-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 0.72 (0.57-0.86)).

Conclusions

Psychosocial work environment should be considered when investigating factors related to the health and wellbeing of police.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
JDC model; Law enforcement; Musculoskeletal disorders; Occupational epidemiology; SWES
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39058 (URN)10.1177/1403494818801507 (DOI)000466373100005 ()30253688 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059702282 (Scopus ID)
Note

Included in thesis in its submitted form

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Möller, S., Rusaw, D., Hagberg, K. & Ramstrand, N. (2019). Reduced cortical brain activity with the use of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees during walking. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 43(3), 257-265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced cortical brain activity with the use of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees during walking
2019 (English)In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Individuals using a lower-limb prosthesis indicate that they need to concentrate on every step they take. Despite self-reports of increased cognitive demand, there is limited understanding of the link between cognitive processes and walking when using a lower-limb prosthesis.

Objective: The objective was to assess cortical brain activity during level walking in individuals using different prosthetic knee components and compare them to healthy controls. It was hypothesized that the least activity would be observed in the healthy control group, followed by individuals using a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee and finally individuals using a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Methods:: An optical brain imaging system was used to measure relative changes in concentration of oxygenated and de-oxygenated haemoglobin in the frontal and motor cortices during level walking. The number of steps and time to walk 10 m was also recorded. The 6-min walk test was assessed as a measure of functional capacity.

Results: Individuals with a transfemoral or knee-disarticulation amputation, using non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee ( n = 14) or microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee ( n = 15) joints and healthy controls ( n = 16) participated in the study. A significant increase was observed in cortical brain activity of individuals walking with a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee when compared to healthy controls ( p < 0.05) and individuals walking with an microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint ( p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Individuals walking with a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee demonstrated an increase in cortical brain activity compared to healthy individuals. Use of a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee was associated with less cortical brain activity than use of a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee.

Clinical Relevance: Increased understanding of cognitive processes underlying walking when using different types of prosthetic knees can help to optimize selection of prosthetic components and provide an opportunity to enhance functioning with a prosthesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Attention, artificial limb, brain, gait, neuroimaging
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42040 (URN)10.1177/0309364618805260 (DOI)000473489500003 ()30375285 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059453859 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Jarl, G. & Ramstrand, N. (2018). A model to facilitate implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health into prosthetics and orthotics. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 42(5), 468-475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A model to facilitate implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health into prosthetics and orthotics
2018 (English)In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 468-475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is a classification of human functioning and disability and is based on a biopsychosocial model of health. As such, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health seems suitable as a basis for constructing models defining the clinical P&O process. The aim was to use International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to facilitate development of such a model. Proposed model: A model, the Prosthetic and Orthotic Process (POP) model, is proposed. The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model is based on the concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and comprises four steps in a cycle: (1) Assessment, including the medical history and physical examination of the patient. (2) Goals, specified on four levels including those related to participation, activity, body functions and structures and technical requirements of the device. (3) Intervention, in which the appropriate course of action is determined based on the specified goal and evidence-based practice. (4) Evaluation of outcomes, where the outcomes are assessed and compared to the corresponding goals. After the evaluation of goal fulfilment, the first cycle in the process is complete, and a broad evaluation is now made including overriding questions about the patient's satisfaction with the outcomes and the process. This evaluation will determine if the process should be ended or if another cycle in the process should be initiated.

CONCLUSION: The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model can provide a common understanding of the P&O process. Concepts of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health have been incorporated into the model to facilitate communication with other rehabilitation professionals and encourage a holistic and patient-centred approach in clinical practice. Clinical relevance The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model can support the implementation of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in P&O practice, thereby providing a common understanding of the P&O process and a common language to facilitate communication with other rehabilitation professionals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Orthotics, prosthetics, rehabilitation, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, treatment outcomes
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Other Health Sciences Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37429 (URN)10.1177/0309364617729925 (DOI)000444981600001 ()28905670 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041903423 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Fatone, S., Paul, C., Barnett, C. & Ramstrand, N. (2018). Balancing Act: Exploring Clinical, Theoretical, and Evidence-Based Perspectives in the Optimization of Balance using orthoses in Peripheral Neuropathy. Paper presented at 44th Academy Annual Meeting & Scientific Symposium, February 14-17, 2018, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Journal of prosthetics and orthotics, 30(2S), Article ID 0S9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing Act: Exploring Clinical, Theoretical, and Evidence-Based Perspectives in the Optimization of Balance using orthoses in Peripheral Neuropathy
2018 (English)In: Journal of prosthetics and orthotics, ISSN 1040-8800, E-ISSN 1534-6331, Vol. 30, no 2S, article id 0S9Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2018
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42243 (URN)
Conference
44th Academy Annual Meeting & Scientific Symposium, February 14-17, 2018, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Ramstrand, N. & Möller, S. (2018). Can prostheses and orthoses reduce the demand on higher order cognitive processes during walking?. In: : . Paper presented at The 11th Nordic prosthetist and orthotist conference Copenhagen, Denmark, 6th – 8th September 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can prostheses and orthoses reduce the demand on higher order cognitive processes during walking?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42232 (URN)
Conference
The 11th Nordic prosthetist and orthotist conference Copenhagen, Denmark, 6th – 8th September 2018
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Ramstrand, N. (2018). Clinical outcome measures to evaluate the effects of lower-limb orthotic management post-stroke. In: : . Paper presented at The 11th Nordic prosthetist and orthotist conference Copenhagen, Denmark, 6th – 8th September 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical outcome measures to evaluate the effects of lower-limb orthotic management post-stroke
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Keywords
orthotic device, Stroke, outcome measures
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42239 (URN)
Conference
The 11th Nordic prosthetist and orthotist conference Copenhagen, Denmark, 6th – 8th September 2018
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Ramstrand, N. & Ramstrand, S. (2018). Competency standards for newly graduated prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 42(4), 387-393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competency standards for newly graduated prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 387-393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

There are currently no national competency standards upon which to develop educational objectives for prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden. While standards have been developed in other countries, they cannot be applied without confirming their relevance in a Swedish context.

Objectives:

To describe and obtain consensus on core competencies required for newly graduated prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden.

Study design:

Modified Delphi process.

Methods:

A modified Delphi technique was carried out. Focus groups were initially used to identify core competency domains. Two consecutive questionnaires, containing a list of potential competency items, were sent to a group of stakeholders with ties to the prosthetic and orthotic profession. Stakeholders were requested to rate their level of agreement with each competency item and provide written comments. Finally, two focus groups were conducted to obtain feedback on the draft competency standards.

Results:

Forty-four competency items, listed under five key domains of practice, were identified as essential for newly graduated prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden.

Conclusions:

Many similarities exist in core competency descriptions for prosthetist/orthotists in Sweden when compared to other countries. Regional differences do however exist, and it is important to confirm the relevance of core competency items at a national level before they are applied.

Clinical relevance

Competency standards developed in this study can be used to guide development of learning objectives within an undergraduate prosthetic and orthotic program, provide a framework for workforce development, assist professional organizations in understanding the needs of their members, and prepare for international accreditation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Prosthetics, orthotics, education, consensus, competency standards, Delphi technique
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39522 (URN)10.1177/0309364618774056 (DOI)000439608300003 ()29775171 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047423176 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8994-8786

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