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Publications (10 of 173) Show all publications
Sandgren, M., Uman, T. & Nordqvist, M. (2024). The role of the strategic apex in shaping the disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis. The British Accounting Review, Article ID 101302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of the strategic apex in shaping the disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis
2024 (English)In: The British Accounting Review, ISSN 0890-8389, E-ISSN 1095-8347, article id 101302Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study draws on attribution theory to examine how and by what means the firm's top management team, board members, and owner(s) (i.e., the strategic apex) shape disclosure strategies. Drawing on interviews and archival data spanning six years, we conduct a case study of a financially distressed private family-owned media group. Unique access to these data allowed us to peer into the disclosure strategy formation process that typically takes place behind closed doors in private firms. Our findings show that financial distress preceded the formation of the disclosure strategy and the voluntary disclosure practices designed to satisfy financially powerful stakeholders, and that internal whistleblowers act as a low-cost disclosure tool to inform financially weaker stakeholders. In addition, the development of the disclosure strategy is strongly influenced by the strategic apex, which forms collaborative teams, organises stakeholders and their information needs, and meticulously manages and controls the content and timing of voluntary disclosures. Our findings also suggest that a tightly knit disclosure strategy and voluntary disclosure practices are used to influence rather than inform, to manage stakeholder interactions, and to influence public opinion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Accounting, Disclosure strategy, Family ownership, Reporting, Strategic apex
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63362 (URN)10.1016/j.bar.2023.101302 (DOI)2-s2.0-85181671344 (Scopus ID)HOA;;928233 (Local ID)HOA;;928233 (Archive number)HOA;;928233 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Sandgren, M., Uman, T. & Nordqvist, M. (2023). Accountants in family firms: a systematic literature review. Small Business Economics, 61, 349-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accountants in family firms: a systematic literature review
2023 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 61, p. 349-388Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to review the body of the literature on the role of individual accountants in the context of family firms, synthesize the findings, outline directions for future research, and to present an integrative framework that summarizes these directions. The study utilizes a systematic literature review approach and is guided by three overarching questions related to the field's development, a reflection on current state-of-the-art research, and an outlook for the field's future paths. The questions are answered through the mapping and analysis of 39 key articles over a 20-year period. We show central patterns in theory, data, methods, and findings. Our review reveals that the literature is scattered, and that the role of accountants is found to be context dependent. In existing research, an accountant tends to have the roles of a traditional bean counter, a decision-maker, an advisor, and a protector and mediator. Scholars also show that an accountant influences various organizational outcomes in family firms. The review further reveals that accountants can play a key role in accounting- and strategy-related decisions with impact on family firm's survival and growth. We offer a map of the research on accountants in family firms and an integrative framework. This work does not only highlight the importance of an accountant's role in family firms but it also allows us to identify numerous research gaps and a pathway for future research in terms of methods, theories, and models.

Plain English Summary: This systematic literature review puts a spotlight on the role of the individual accountant in family firms. Our review reveals that accountants take four distinct roles in family firms: a traditional bean counter, a decision-maker, an advisor, and a protector and mediator. Our review further shows that accountants play a key role in accounting and strategy-related decisions of consequence for family firms. We also outline areas where additional research efforts can help to generate a better understanding of how, when, and why individual accountants, in addition to their accounting function, matter for the family firms that employ them. The principal implication of this study is that research should embark on further exploration of the individual accountant in the family firm context and employ diverse methods and theories in doing so.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Accountant, Accounting, Family firm, Family ownership, Role, Systematic literature review
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58705 (URN)10.1007/s11187-022-00693-8 (DOI)000866310700002 ()2-s2.0-85139673924 (Scopus ID)HOA;;839098 (Local ID)HOA;;839098 (Archive number)HOA;;839098 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-10-26 Created: 2022-10-26 Last updated: 2023-08-29Bibliographically approved
Smith, C., Rondi, E., De Massis, A. & Nordqvist, M. (2023). Rising Every Time We Fall: Organizational Fortitude and Response to Adversities. Journal of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rising Every Time We Fall: Organizational Fortitude and Response to Adversities
2023 (English)In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of organizational resilience enabling firms to respond to adversity and survive has become ever more critical in the wake of an increasingly unpredictable external environment. Yet, while we understand the importance of resilience in responding to a major adversity, we have little appreciation for how firms are affected and react when facing multiple adversities over time, or how multilevel factors might impose on this process. These are crucial issues given that adversities are not necessarily single, isolated, or infrequent episodes. By studying a long-established family firm in the United Kingdom that experienced four major adversities, we identify the process that enabled it not only to survive but also to thrive. In this qualitative study, we introduce the notion of organizational fortitude to describe the approach that a firm develops to cope with the challenges of multiple unexpected adversities and highlight how multilevel factors combine to foster organizational fortitude.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
adversity, case study, family firms, organizational fortitude, resilience
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60332 (URN)10.1177/01492063231164969 (DOI)000976708400001 ()2-s2.0-85153717795 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;878968 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;878968 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;878968 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-05-29
Sandgren, M., Uman, T. & Nordqvist, M. (2022). The upper apex role in shaping a disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis. In: : . Paper presented at 44th Annual European Accounting Association Congress, 11‐13 May 2022, Bergen, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The upper apex role in shaping a disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59629 (URN)
Conference
44th Annual European Accounting Association Congress, 11‐13 May 2022, Bergen, Norway
Available from: 2023-02-03 Created: 2023-02-03 Last updated: 2023-02-03Bibliographically approved
Sandgren, M., Uman, T. & Nordqvist, M. (2022). The upper apex role in shaping a disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis. In: : . Paper presented at National Accounting Conference (NSAC), 1-2 December 2022, Lund, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The upper apex role in shaping a disclosure strategy: A family firm in crisis
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59630 (URN)
Conference
National Accounting Conference (NSAC), 1-2 December 2022, Lund, Sweden
Available from: 2023-02-03 Created: 2023-02-03 Last updated: 2023-02-03Bibliographically approved
Ramírez-Pasillas, M. & Nordqvist, M. (2021). Because family cares: Building engagement for family entrepreneurship through sustainability. In: M. R. Allen, & W. B. Gartner (Ed.), Family entrepreneurship: Insights from leading experts on successful multi-generational entrepreneurial families (pp. 315-329). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Because family cares: Building engagement for family entrepreneurship through sustainability
2021 (English)In: Family entrepreneurship: Insights from leading experts on successful multi-generational entrepreneurial families / [ed] M. R. Allen, & W. B. Gartner, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 315-329Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter delineates how entrepreneurial families can build engagement through entrepreneurship by developing or investing in new sustainable ventures. Sustainable ventures strive for the dignity and long-term survival of our planet. They are out most important since human activities affect the life and balance of social-ecological systems on our planet. We thereby propose that engagement is essential for capturing the opportunities for sustainable venturing that emerge in interactions and connections between individuals, family, business and the earth's biosphere. Such engagement facilitates the development of a business purpose that includes and goes beyond financial profits. We connect insights from the family entrepreneurship literature with those from the sustainability literature and suggest three sustainable venturing processes that can help develop engagement with entrepreneurship in the business family. We call these processes igniting family entrepreneurship through sustainability; interplaying between family entrepreneurship and a purpose for sustainability; and interfacing between family entrepreneurship and sustainability. Through these processes, we argue that sustainability provides an opportunity of involving different generations and branches of a family to build commitment around a purpose, and shared values and principles in new sustainable ventures that stretch beyond the traditional financial goals of the business.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021
Keywords
Business family, Family venturing processes, Next generation, Social-ecological systems, Sustainability, Sustainable ventures
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61497 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-66846-4_23 (DOI)2-s2.0-85150672945 (Scopus ID)9783030668457 (ISBN)9783030668464 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-06-22 Created: 2023-06-22 Last updated: 2023-06-22Bibliographically approved
Eze, N. L., Nordqvist, M., Samara, G. & Parada, M. J. (2021). Different Strokes for Different Folks: The Roles of Religion and Tradition for Transgenerational Entrepreneurship in Family Businesses. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 45(4), 792-837
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Strokes for Different Folks: The Roles of Religion and Tradition for Transgenerational Entrepreneurship in Family Businesses
2021 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 792-837Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores how differences originating in religion and traditions imbue family features and business practices that affect the capacity of family businesses to continue being entrepreneurial across generations; that is, to maintain transgenerational entrepreneurship. Building on an in-depth qualitative study of family businesses, we show how differences in religion and traditions within three subregions of a developing country shape the family structure, the functioning of the family, and the family mindset with concomitant implications on the business practices that foster or hinder transgenerational entrepreneurship. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed in the context of entrepreneurship and family business.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
family business, family structure, religion, traditions, transgenerational entrepreneurship
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-51049 (URN)10.1177/1042258720964428 (DOI)000631217700001 ()2-s2.0-85095940178 (Scopus ID);intsam;1503781 (Local ID);intsam;1503781 (Archive number);intsam;1503781 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-11-25 Created: 2020-11-25 Last updated: 2021-12-19Bibliographically approved
Ramírez-Pasillas, M., Nordqvist, M., Baù, M., Sharma, P., Sharma, S. & Radu-Lefebvre, M. (2021). Embracing the Biosphere, Supporting Humanity - A Call to Explore Sustainable Development in Family Entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing the Biosphere, Supporting Humanity - A Call to Explore Sustainable Development in Family Entrepreneurship
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2021 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55673 (URN)
Note

Call for papers.

Available from: 2022-01-24 Created: 2022-01-24 Last updated: 2022-01-24
Kuiken, A., Naldi, L. & Nordqvist, M. (2021). Internationalization of family firms as a discontinuous process: The role of behavioral theory. In: T. Leppäaho & S. Jack (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of family firm internationalization: (pp. 135-171). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationalization of family firms as a discontinuous process: The role of behavioral theory
2021 (English)In: The Palgrave handbook of family firm internationalization / [ed] T. Leppäaho & S. Jack, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 135-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-52967 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-66737-5 (DOI)978-3-030-66736-8 (ISBN)978-3-030-66737-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-06-09 Created: 2021-06-09 Last updated: 2021-06-09Bibliographically approved
Criaco, G., van Oosterhout, J. H. & Nordqvist, M. (2021). Is blood always thicker than water?: Family firm parents, kinship ties, and the survival of spawns. Journal of Business Venturing, 36(6), Article ID 106161.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is blood always thicker than water?: Family firm parents, kinship ties, and the survival of spawns
2021 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 36, no 6, article id 106161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We theorize that due to their ability to draw upon the distinctive bonding and bridging social capital resources of their family firm parents, family member spawns have longer early survival times than nonfamily member spawns from family firms, which in turn should have longer early survival times than spawns from nonfamily firm parents. We also predict that the survival enhancing effects of family parent bonding and bridging social capital are conditional on the spatial, cognitive and social proximity between the parent and the spawn. Using a population wide sample of 114,837 spawns founded in Sweden between 2000 and 2007, we find that nonfamily member spawns survive longer than spawns from nonfamily firms, and that this survival enhancing effect is contingent on the spatial and social proximity between the spawn and its parent. We also find that spawns founded by family members, on average, do not survive longer than spawns from family firms founded by nonfamily members, and that greater spatial and cognitive distance even hurt the survival of family member spawns. We discuss the contributions of our research to the spawning, family firm, and entrepreneurship literatures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Bonding social capital, Bridging social capital, Entrepreneurial spawns, Family firms, Kinship ties, Proximity, Survival
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54993 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2021.106161 (DOI)000710659200003 ()2-s2.0-85117402974 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;774179 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;774179 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;774179 (OAI)
Funder
Carl-Olof och Jenz Hamrins Stiftelse
Available from: 2021-11-01 Created: 2021-11-01 Last updated: 2021-11-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3613-4233

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