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Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Ge, B., Hamilton, E. & Haag, K. (2024). An Entrepreneurship-as-practice perspective of next-generation becoming family businesses successors: the role of discursive artefacts. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 36(3-4), 489-515
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Entrepreneurship-as-practice perspective of next-generation becoming family businesses successors: the role of discursive artefacts
2024 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 36, no 3-4, p. 489-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family is the most important, yet under researched, dimension in family business research. Following recent calls in Entrepreneurship-as-Practice, we bring a practice-based approach to family business research to understand next generation engagement over extended periods in family life. Drawing on a culinary family business’s three published cookbooks, theorized as ‘discursive artefacts’, we examine how mundane family business practices can enable next generations to become successors. This study contributes to family business research with its re-focus on the family and offers new insights into practice theory-building in the emergent Entrepreneurship-as-Practice. Our findings illustrate how everyday practices in family lives–for example, cooking–can enable next generations’ becoming family business successors, through socializing, bridging, and leading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
becoming, discursive artefact, entrepreneurship as practice, Family, family business, next generation, successor
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62831 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2023.2265324 (DOI)001085817700001 ()2-s2.0-85174264845 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;913341 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;913341 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;913341 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-02-29Bibliographically approved
Girma Aragaw, Z., Haag, K. & Baù, M. (2024). Contextualizing corporate entrepreneurship: a systematic review and future research agenda. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualizing corporate entrepreneurship: a systematic review and future research agenda
2024 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Corporate entrepreneurship (CE) is an essential concept in entrepreneurship research. Many scholars have shown CE theoretical and empirical implications for firms’ survival, development, and growth. We use a systematic literature review approach to analyse and discuss 214 articles published in top-tier journals from 1985 to 2023. This review proposes a conceptual model and highlights that little attention has been given to discussing the role of context in the corporate entrepreneurial process. Thus, we propose a research agenda for contextualizing corporate entrepreneurship concerning business, social, spatial, institutional, organizational, and ownership contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
context, Corporate entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial behaviour, entrepreneurial opportunities, internal and external enablers, research agenda, review
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-64145 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2024.2341886 (DOI)001209123800001 ()2-s2.0-85191305197 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;949974 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;949974 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;949974 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-05-07 Created: 2024-05-07 Last updated: 2024-05-07
Haag, K. & Almlöf, H. (2024). Divorce. In: C. Howorth and A. D. Cruz (Ed.), Elgar Encyclopedia of Family Business: (pp. 144-147). Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Divorce
2024 (English)In: Elgar Encyclopedia of Family Business / [ed] C. Howorth and A. D. Cruz, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2024, p. 144-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A divorce of a family business owner does not only affect the divorcing spouses, but it poses a threat to the business and its various stakeholders. Some of the complicating factors stem from the overlapping of roles, where persons that share family ties are also active in the strategic decisions and daily operations of the business. We describe the impact of divorce in the three dimensions of psychosocial, legal, and financial. Tools to decrease the negative impacts of a divorce include family law instruments such as marital agreements, gifts and wills, and company law instruments such as shareholders’ agreements and the articles of associations. Specialized advisors and proper governance structures can also reduce the negative impacts. Family business owners need to increase their awareness on how a potential divorce will affect them and the business, raise the issue, and undertake the necessary preparations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2024
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-65444 (URN)10.4337/9781800888722 (DOI)2-s2.0-85195929056 (Scopus ID)9781800888715 (ISBN)9781800888722 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-06-27 Created: 2024-06-27 Last updated: 2024-06-27Bibliographically approved
Baù, M., Karlsson, J., Haag, K., Pittino, D. & Chirico, F. (2024). Employee layoffs in times of crisis: do family firms differ?. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employee layoffs in times of crisis: do family firms differ?
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this study, we seek to understand firm behaviour during times of crisis, with a particular focus on family firms in different contexts. We theorize that family control mitigates (i.e. negatively moderates) the relationship between economic crisis and the layoff of employees, resulting in a higher propensity of family firms to retain their employees during a crisis compared to their nonfamily counterparts. Furthermore, taking a closer look at family firms, based on their location, we argue that family firms in rural regions are more likely to adopt measures leading to involuntary job turnover than family firms in urban areas due to a higher sensitivity to the loss of socioemotional wealth following a business closure. Relying on a panel dataset of Swedish private firms active in the period 2004-2012, our study contributes to a better understanding of family firms as employers in different contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
Family firms, socioemotional wealth, local embeddedness, rural environment, economic crisis, employee layoff
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63483 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2024.2309160 (DOI)001153476100001 ()2-s2.0-85183925567 (Scopus ID)HOA;;935478 (Local ID)HOA;;935478 (Archive number)HOA;;935478 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-20
Banerjee, A. & Haag, K. (2024). How do boards strategize in purpose-driven organizations: The case of Scouterna in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at 40th EGOS Colloquium, Crossroads for organizations: Time, Space and People, July 4-6, 2024, Milan, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do boards strategize in purpose-driven organizations: The case of Scouterna in Sweden
2024 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-64990 (URN)
Conference
40th EGOS Colloquium, Crossroads for organizations: Time, Space and People, July 4-6, 2024, Milan, Italy
Note

Presenter: Kajsa Haag

Available from: 2024-06-17 Created: 2024-06-17 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Haag, K., Achtenhagen, L. & Grimm, J. (2023). Engaging With the Category: Exploring Family Business Longevity From a Historical Perspective. Family Business Review, 36(1), 84-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging With the Category: Exploring Family Business Longevity From a Historical Perspective
2023 (English)In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 84-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Longevity is at the core of what makes family businesses special. Unlike most attempts to explain longevity that have focused primarily on the factors within a family business that lead to longevity or the factors outside of an organization’s environment, we adopt a business-history perspective that enables us to show how the interplay between the organization and its environment can help to explain family business longevity. Building on the category literature, we trace the interaction of a small Swedish fourth-generation high-quality furniture manufacturer with its category over a period of more than 120 years. We identify the internal mechanisms driving family business longevity, the external mechanisms driving category development as well as the mechanisms underlying their interaction. Specifically, we provide new insights into how agency exercised by the family business contributes to the shaping of the category they are a member of, thereby nurturing their business longevity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
business history, case study, category, family business longevity, Scandinavian design
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59917 (URN)10.1177/08944865231154835 (DOI)000934531100001 ()2-s2.0-85148628125 (Scopus ID)HOA;;862650 (Local ID)HOA;;862650 (Archive number)HOA;;862650 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-02-27 Created: 2023-02-27 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Haag, K., Almlöf, H., Madsen, M. B. & Neville, M. (2023). Legal Advisors and Family Business Owners: A Transaction Cost Understanding of “the Ownership Contract”. Family Business Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Legal Advisors and Family Business Owners: A Transaction Cost Understanding of “the Ownership Contract”
2023 (English)In: Family Business Review, ISSN 0894-4865, E-ISSN 1741-6248Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Family business owners are dependent on legal advice to control ownership changes and uphold a functional balance between owners. This advice spans both family law and business law. However, family business owners are found to underutilize the legal instruments available, especially for small- and medium-sized enterprises. We explore the market for legal advice provided to family business owners. Our findings describe specific ownership costs that decrease owners’ willingness and ability to contract. This avoidance of ex ante costs puts the owners at risk of extensive ex post costs that could ultimately jeopardize the business.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
advisors, family business, legal advice, ownership costs, ownership regulation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63286 (URN)10.1177/08944865231217882 (DOI)001133445000001 ()2-s2.0-85180908974 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;926165 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;926165 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;926165 (OAI)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationTore Browaldhs stiftelse
Available from: 2024-01-10 Created: 2024-01-10 Last updated: 2024-01-15
Segaro, E. L. & Haag, K. (2022). Good Intentions Gone Awry: Government Intervention and Multistakeholder Engagement in a Frontier Market. Journal of Business Ethics, 180, 1019-1040
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Good Intentions Gone Awry: Government Intervention and Multistakeholder Engagement in a Frontier Market
2022 (English)In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 180, p. 1019-1040Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How to achieve sustainable communities with decent work and economic growth without negative environmental impact, is at the heart of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and a top priority of many governments around the world. This article critically explores the role of government intervention for achieving sustainable local prosperity in frontier markets of developing countries, where such advancement is especially crucial. More specifically, we explore by an in-depth case study how multiple stakeholders cooperate to enhance local development and export from firms in the leather and leather products industry in Ethiopia. From a multistakeholder engagement perspective, including representatives of local businesses, United Nations, Ministry of Trade and Industry, and other development partners, we analyze how government interventions have resulted in unintended outcomes despite their good intention. We contribute with a new understanding of why development initiatives in frontier markets struggle with stakeholder integration, caused by power asymmetry and lack of institutional trust which prevents the achievements of sustainable development goals. Contextualized implications for firms, government, and non-governmental actors on how to improve collaboration are provided, and policy implications are proposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Multistakeholder collaboration, SDGs, Institutional trust, Family business, Developing countries, Ethiopia
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58080 (URN)10.1007/s10551-022-05197-9 (DOI)000827917200002 ()2-s2.0-85134623078 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;823170 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;823170 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;823170 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-07-28 Created: 2022-07-28 Last updated: 2022-12-10Bibliographically approved
Achtenhagen, L., Haag, K., Hultén, K. & Lundgren, J. (2022). Torn between individual aspirations and the family legacy – individual career development in family firms. Career Development International, 27(2), 201-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Torn between individual aspirations and the family legacy – individual career development in family firms
2022 (English)In: Career Development International, ISSN 1362-0436, E-ISSN 1758-6003, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore individual career management by family members in the context of their family firms.

Design/methodology/approach: The interpretative interview study of family members active in family businesses explores how this context affects the choice, planning, goals and development of family members' careers in their family business.

Findings: The authors find that career management in the family business setting focuses on fulfilling the family business goals rather than the personal goals of family members. Career management is rather reactive and less self-directed than current literature on career development recommends. Based on the results, the authors develop a process model for individual career management in the family business context.

Originality/value: Little is known about individual career management of family members in a family business context, as research on careers in family firms has so far focused mainly on transgenerational succession. The authors explore how in family firms, the trend towards self-directed, individual career planning is in tension with a commitment to the family business and its legacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022
Keywords
Family business, Family legacy, Interview study
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55513 (URN)10.1108/CDI-06-2020-0156 (DOI)000740693800001 ()2-s2.0-85122176833 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-12 Created: 2022-01-12 Last updated: 2022-12-18Bibliographically approved
Haag, K. & Achtenhagen, L. (2021). The impact of divorce on the family business system in SMEs - patterns of coping strategies, commitment and ownership regulations. International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, 44(4), 335-358
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of divorce on the family business system in SMEs - patterns of coping strategies, commitment and ownership regulations
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 335-358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we outline how the divorce of the main owner-manager of a family-owned SME impacts the family business system. Divorce not only represents a pronounced family failure, but it can also be a highly stressful condition for the family members involved. To date, the impact of divorce on family businesses remains understudied, despite rates of divorce as high as 50% in some countries. Drawing on almost a decade of experience with engaged scholarship at the interface between divorce and family businesses, we selected four typical case studies to illustrate different coping strategies and show how divorce can change the strategic outlook of the family business system in SMEs by altering the commitment of the owner family to maintain the business in the family as well as ensuring the business continuation per se. Moreover, we exemplify how legal ownership regulations can shape family businesses strategic scope after divorce by impacting the financial situation. We integrate these findings into a model of family business system adaptation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2021
Keywords
family business; divorce; Sweden; engaged scholarship; crisis
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55041 (URN)10.1504/IJESB.2022.10042616 (DOI)2-s2.0-85122041327 (Scopus ID)HOA;;55041 (Local ID)HOA;;55041 (Archive number)HOA;;55041 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-11-08 Created: 2021-11-08 Last updated: 2022-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0931-9136

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