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Steigenberger, NorbertORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8304-5321
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Steigenberger, N. & Wilhelm, H. (2018). Extending Signaling Theory to Rhetorical Signals: Evidence from Crowdfunding. Organization science (Providence, R.I.), 29(3), 529-546
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extending Signaling Theory to Rhetorical Signals: Evidence from Crowdfunding
2018 (English)In: Organization science (Providence, R.I.), ISSN 1047-7039, E-ISSN 1526-5455, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 529-546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Firms often need to acquire external financial resources to maintain and develop their business. To attract these resources, firms employ various substantive and rhetorical signals, such as publishing press releases, showcasing prototypes of new products, and hiring renowned managers. However, despite the relevance of signals, we still know little about how they interact—whether they strengthen, weaken, or neutralize one another—in attracting resources. Traditional signaling theory downplays the importance of rhetoric while management research acknowledges its relevance, creating a disconnect between these two camps and a shortcoming that deserves further investigation. To address this shortcoming, we advance the concept of signal portfolios. Signal portfolios may combine rhetorical signals with substantive signals. We employ this concept to explain how the interaction of the two affects financial resource acquisition in high-noise environments—settings where firms send multiple signals simultaneously. Based on longitudinal data on crowdfunding, an exemplary high-noise environment, we find that rhetorical signals complement substantive signals in certain situations and, thus, strengthen their impact on a firm’s financial resource acquisition. Contrary to our expectations, however, we find that under specific conditions, rhetorical signals may also weaken the impact of substantive signals. Our research has implications for signaling theory, crowdfunding research, and management practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), 2018
Keywords
signaling theory, rhetoric, signal portfolio, high-noise environments, crowdfunding
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39518 (URN)10.1287/orsc.2017.1195 (DOI)000440202900010 ()2-s2.0-85048073709 (Scopus ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Local ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Archive number)IHHÖvrigtIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Steigenberger, N. & Mirc, N. (2017). A Configurational Approach to Identification and Employee Retention after an Acquisition Event. In: : . Paper presented at 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.. Academy of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Configurational Approach to Identification and Employee Retention after an Acquisition Event
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Retaining employees is a critical predictor of success or failure in many post-acquisition integration projects. Social identification strongly affects employees’ intentions to remain with or leave a firm after an acquisition. In the last years, a strong understanding developed that specifically identification with the organization affects an employee’s intention to leave or to stay within the new organization. This article suggests that organizational identification alone is not sufficient to bring employees to stay. We employ a social identity perspective to exploratively study combinations of conditions that need to be in place alongside organizational identification for employees to develop a strong intention to leave or to stay after an acquisition. Building on a mixed method approach combining fuzzy-set methodology (fsQCA) with qualitative data, our analysis shows a nuanced picture of how multi-focus identification patterns influence employee retention. The paper highlights the configurations of conditions that need to be present for identification to transfer into behavior and shows that the combinations that lead to strong commitment to stay are substantially different from those that lead to strong intention to leave. Based on these insights, we advance theory on contingency conditions for the identification-retention relationship from a social identity perspective. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2017
Keywords
Identification, Post-acquisition integration, Professions, Social identity theory, mixed-method, fsQCA
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35306 (URN)
Conference
77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.
Note

AOM 2017 Theme: At the Interface

Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-09-12
Steigenberger, N., Lubcke, T., Fiala, H. & Riebschlager, A. (2017). Decision Modes in Complex Task Environments. CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision Modes in Complex Task Environments
2017 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite intense research on decision-making in action, we still know little about when decision-makers rely on deliberate vs. intuitive decision-making in decision situations under complexity and uncertainty. Building on default-interventionist dual-processing theory, this book studies decision-making modes (deliberate vs. intuitive) in complex task environments contingent on perceived complexity, experience, and decision style preference. We find that relatively inexperienced decision-makers respond to increases in subjective complexity with an increase in deliberation and tend to follow their decision style preference. Experienced decision-makers are less guided by their decision preference and respond to increases in subjective complexity only minimally. This book contributes to a developing stream of research linking decision-making with intra-personal and environmental properties and fosters our understanding of the conditions under which decision-makers rely on intuitive vs. deliberate decision modes. In doing so, we go one step further towards a comprehensive theory of decision-making in action.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press, 2017. p. 168
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34357 (URN)9781138748460 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Mirc, N., Véry, P., Steigenberger, N. & Ebers, M. (2017). Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?. In: : . Paper presented at EURAM Conference 2017, Glasgow, 21-24 June, 2017.. European Academy of Management (EURAM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Acquisition integration requires emergent cooperation between individuals of two firms in order to combine and transfer resources. In this paper, we make use of social network analysis to study the influence of intra-firm network positions on individuals’ engagement in cooperations with the acquisition partner and analyze the effects of such behavior. We find that integration is mainly promoted by highly central as well as highly peripheral individuals in their intra-firm networks as well as by employees hired after the acquisition, indistinctive of their network position. When studying the benefits of integration driving cooperation, we found evidence for effects of preferential attachment and that overall rather non-cooperative behavior ensured revenue increases. Our results point towards the importance of opportunity-driven behavior when networks merge and nuance the notion of value leakage associated with acquisition integration, by suggesting that non-cooperative behavior can help compensate integration-related costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Academy of Management (EURAM), 2017
Keywords
Mergers and acquisitions, integration, cooperation, employee engagement, network development
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35540 (URN)
Conference
EURAM Conference 2017, Glasgow, 21-24 June, 2017.
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2018-09-12
Mirc, N., Véry, P., Steigenberger, N. & Ebers, M. (2017). Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?. In: : . Paper presented at 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.. Academy of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Acquisition integration requires emergent cooperation between individuals of two firms in order to combine and transfer resources. In this paper, we make use of social network analysis to study the influence of intra-firm network positions on individuals’ engagement in cooperations with the acquisition partner and analyze the effects of such behavior. We find that integration is mainly promoted by highly central as well as highly peripheral individuals in their intra-firm networks as well as by employees hired after the acquisition, indistinctive of their network position. When studying the benefits of integration driving cooperation, we found evidence for effects of preferential attachment and that overall rather non-cooperative behavior ensured revenue increases. Our results point towards the importance of opportunity-driven behavior when networks merge and nuance the notion of value leakage associated with acquisition integration, by suggesting that non-cooperative behavior can help compensate integration-related costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2017
Keywords
Mergers and acquisitions, integration, cooperation, employee engagement, network development
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35309 (URN)
Conference
77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.
Note

AOM 2017 Theme: At the Interface

Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-09-12
Wilhelm, H., Steigenberger, N. & Juntunen, J. (2017). Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations. In: 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization: Aspirations, Interventions, Struggles, Copenhagen, July 6–8, 2017.: . Paper presented at EGOS 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations
2017 (English)In: 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization: Aspirations, Interventions, Struggles, Copenhagen, July 6–8, 2017., 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

Keywords
Mergers and acquisitions, integration, cooperation, employee engagement, network development
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35310 (URN)
Conference
EGOS 2017
Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2017-04-04
Wilhelm, H., Steigenberger, N. & Juntunen, J. (2017). Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations. In: : . Paper presented at 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.. Academy of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2017
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35308 (URN)
Conference
77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, August 4-8, 2017.
Note

AOM 2017 Theme: At the Interface

Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-09-12
Semrau, T., Steigenberger, N. & Wilhelm, H. (2017). Team political skill and team performance. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 32(3), 239-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Team political skill and team performance
2017 (English)In: Journal of Managerial Psychology, ISSN 0268-3946, E-ISSN 1758-7778, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relation between team political skill, i.e., the mean level of political skill among team members, and team performance. Specifically, it proposes that the link between team political skill and team performance is ambiguous and contingent upon a common professional background as well as collective team commitment within the team.

Design/methodology/approach: Data from 45 service teams with 295 team members and their supervisors were analyzed. Hypotheses were tested using OLS regression. Findings: The results show that a common professional background and collective team commitment serve as crucial contingencies for the relationship between team political skill and team performance.

Research limitations/implications: This study complements previous individual-level research demonstrating a positive relation between political skill and relevant outcomes by highlighting that the link between team political skill and team performance is ambiguous and contingent upon other team characteristics.

Practical implications: To enhance team performance, managers should carefully consider the interplay between team political skill and other team characteristics when making staffing decisions.

Originality/value: The study highlights the relation of political skill with team performance and points to a potential downside of political skill in organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Political skill, Professional background, Team commitment, Team performance
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35305 (URN)10.1108/JMP-03-2016-0074 (DOI)000404815900003 ()2-s2.0-85020744442 (Scopus ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Local ID)IHHÖvrigtIS (Archive number)IHHÖvrigtIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Steigenberger, N. (2017). The challenge of integration: A review of the M&A integration literature. International journal of management reviews (Print), 19(4), 408-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenge of integration: A review of the M&A integration literature
2017 (English)In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 408-431Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The integration of acquired or merging firms is a key driver of the success or failure of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Over the last 30 years, a substantial body of research has addressed M&A integration, offering rich but widely dispersed insights into this phenomenon. This paper takes stock of the current knowledge, based on a review of articles published in scholarly journals. The review advances the conceptual understanding of the phenomenon by inductively developing an overarching framework for the M&A integration literature, where integration success is a function of context, structural and communication-based interventions, which interact with collective sensemaking processes and negotiations among integration stakeholders. Based on this framework, a research agenda is suggested. I proposes that, in particular, the interaction between structural interventions and leadership warrants further study. Also, little is known about integration project management and integration team composition or the interaction between integration context and collective sensemaking processes. Finally, there is a shortage of research on temporal dynamics within integration projects. The review demonstrates that M&A scholars made substantial progress regarding our understanding of the M&A integration process, yet much remains to be done.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31219 (URN)10.1111/ijmr.12099 (DOI)000419165500002 ()2-s2.0-84963542575 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-10 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Steigenberger, N. (2017). Why Supporters Contribute to Reward-based Crowdfunding. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, 23(2), 336-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Supporters Contribute to Reward-based Crowdfunding
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 336-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the motivation of supporters to contribute resources to reward-based crowdfunding campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports results from a survey combining open and closed questions, addressing supporters of reward-based crowdfunding campaigns in the field of video game development. Publicly available data from a large crowdfunding website complements the approach.

Findings

Two groups of supporters emerge from the data: One group derives motivation almost exclusively from a purchasing motive, the other group displays the purchasing motive alongside an altruistic and involvement motive. There is little indication that social acknowledgement plays a role for supporter motivation. Supporters rely on the evaluation of previous activities of an entrepreneur to judge trustworthiness.

Originality/value

The manuscript offers empirical insights into the previously scarcely researched question why supporters contribute to reward-based crowdfunding. These insights inform research on reward-based crowdfunding and help entrepreneurs considering reward-based crowdfunding as a way to fund entrepreneurial activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Entrepreneurial finance; Mixed-method; Motivation; Reward-based crowdfunding
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34356 (URN)10.1108/IJEBR-04-2016-0117 (DOI)000399057200011 ()2-s2.0-85014910277 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8304-5321

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