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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Patel, P. C., Criaco, G. & Naldi, L. (2018). Geographic diversification and the survival of born-globals. Journal of Management, 44(5), 2008-2036
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geographic diversification and the survival of born-globals
2018 (English)In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 2008-2036Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The staged internationalization model posits that firms internationalize incrementally over time. However, born-globals are less likely to follow a more gradual model of staged internationalization, and they must decide on the scope of internationalization at their founding to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities on a global scale. Because returns from international expansion must be considered along with the risk of failure, we propose that born-globals’ local industry conditions moderate the relationship between the scope of intraregional diversification (geographic diversification within a region) or interregional diversification (geographic diversification across different regions) and survival. Using a sample of 680 Swedish born-globals founded in 2002, 2003, or 2004 and followed until 2010; data from Swedish Customs; and archival performance data, we find that interregional geographic diversification increases—and that intraregional diversification decreases—the likelihood of failure, which declines further when born-globals undertake intraregional geographic diversification under higher environmental dynamism in the home country industry. Conversely, undertaking interregional geographic diversification even when the home country industry is munificent increases the likelihood of failure (marginally significant). The findings are robust to several alternative specifications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
geographic diversification; international entrepreneurship; intraregional geographic diversification; interregional geographic diversification; industry dynamism; industry munificence; born-globals; survival
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29792 (URN)10.1177/0149206316635251 (DOI)000430023000013 ()2-s2.0-85045461388 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Chirico, F., Criaco, G., Baù, M., Naldi, L., Gomez-Mejia, L. R. & Kotlar, J. (2018). To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms
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2018 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Intellectual property protection, patent, innovation, environmental munificence, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41546 (URN)10.1177/1042258718806251 (DOI)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-08-21
Criaco, G., Sieger, P., Wennberg, K., Chirico, F. & Minola, T. (2017). Parents' performance in entrepreneurship as a "double-edged sword" for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics, 49(4), 841-864
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' performance in entrepreneurship as a "double-edged sword" for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship
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2017 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 841-864Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigate how perceived parents’ performance in entrepreneurship (PPE) affects the entrepreneurial career intentions of offspring. We argue that while perceived PPE enhances offspring’s perceived entrepreneurial desirability and feasibility because of exposure mechanisms, it weakens the translation of both desirability and feasibility into entrepreneurial career intentions due to upward social comparison mechanisms. Thus, perceived PPE acts as a double-edged sword for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship. Our predictions are tested and confirmed on a sample of 21,895 individuals from 33 countries. This study advances the literature on intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship by providing a foundation for understanding the social psychological conditions necessary for such transmission to occur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship; parents’ performance in entrepreneurship; entrepreneurial career intention; social comparison theory; perceived desirability; perceived feasibility
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35219 (URN)10.1007/s11187-017-9854-x (DOI)000416227700008 ()2-s2.0-85018764295 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-03-20 Created: 2017-03-20 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved
Minola, T., Criaco, G. & Obschonka, M. (2016). Age, culture, and self-employment motivation. Small Business Economics, 46(2), 187-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age, culture, and self-employment motivation
2016 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 187-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To study the interplay between age and culture as driver of self-employment motivation, we examine cross-sectional age differences (young to late adulthood) in self-employment desirability and feasibility beliefs across different cultures. We utilize individual-level data from the 2012 Flash Eurobarometer survey collected in 21 countries (total N = 13,963 individuals) and culture-level data from the GLOBE project. Our results from multi-level regression analyses show similar curvilinear lifespan patterns in both desirability and feasibility beliefs, with a peak in young adulthood and a strong decline toward late adulthood. This general pattern of age differences in these motivational factors, however, differs significantly across cultural dimensions of uncertainty avoidance, institutional collectivism and performance orientation. Notwithstanding the limitations of cross-sectional data, the present results indicate that individual factors motivating self-employment are systematically intertwined with, and embedded in, both age and culture. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Age, Entrepreneurship, Culture, Self-employment motivation, Life-span
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28770 (URN)10.1007/s11187-015-9685-6 (DOI)000368738300002 ()2-s2.0-84944704479 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-12-28 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
Zahra, S. A., Criaco, G., Naldi, L. & Larraneta, B. (2015). Industry Knowledge Characteristics, Prior Experience and New Venture Survival. In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2015 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 17103: . Paper presented at Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Vancouver, August 7-11, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industry Knowledge Characteristics, Prior Experience and New Venture Survival
2015 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2015 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 17103, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent research suggests that new ventures can overcome threats to their survival by gaining access to technological knowledge from other firms in their industry, even without directly transacting with them or joining their networks. This happens through vicarious learning that allows these ventures to abduct spillovers of industry knowledge made public through patents. We propose that the effects of the industry public knowledge on new venture survival are likely to depend on the unique characteristics of that knowledge—its breadth and newness—and its interaction with a venture’s human capital’s prior experience in the industry. We test and find support for these predictions in a sample of Swedish new ventures. The study contributes to the literatures in organizational learning and new venture survival.

Keywords
knowledge, new ventures, survival
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29246 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2015.17103abstract (DOI)
Conference
Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Vancouver, August 7-11, 2015.
Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-27 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Criaco, G. (2015). Organisational ecology and the family business. In: Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto (Ed.), Theoretical perspectives on family businesses: (pp. 18-34). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organisational ecology and the family business
2015 (English)In: Theoretical perspectives on family businesses / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Leif Melin, Matthias Waldkirch and Gershon Kumeto, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 18-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organisational ecology has long studied the survival of organisations. However, few studies have focused on how such perspective can be applied to investigate similar topics in distinct organisational forms, such as family businesses. This book chapter thus attempts to apply an organisational ecology perspective to the study of family businesses. More specifically, it explores how such perspective can inform research on the survival of family businesses. Special attention is given to environmental determinants conceptualised at the industry level

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015
Keywords
organisational ecology, family business, survival, environments, industries
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28769 (URN)10.4337/9781783479665.00009 (DOI)9781783479658 (ISBN)9781783479665 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-28 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2016-12-15Bibliographically approved
Minola, T., Criaco, G. & Cassia, L. (2014). Are Youth Really Different?: New Beliefs for Old Practices in Entrepreneurship. International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, 18(2-3), 233-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Youth Really Different?: New Beliefs for Old Practices in Entrepreneurship
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 18, no 2-3, p. 233-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article reviews and systematises prior studies focusing on the differences between young and old people in entrepreneurship. This study highlights that the young are different in several areas: accumulation of resources and skills; psychological, cognitive and motivational attributes; and reaction to influences from the environment, culture and norms. This article provides guidance about promising avenues for future research and encourages policy attention for the field of youth entrepreneurship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2014
Keywords
youth entrepreneurship, age and entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship policies, young entrepreneurs, enterprising individuals
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28771 (URN)10.1504/IJEIM.2014.062881 (DOI)2-s2.0-84903725960 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-12-28 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Criaco, G. & Nordqvist, M. (2014). Back To The Roots: Inherited Ownership Effects and Spawns’ Performance. In: Strategies in a World of Networks: . Paper presented at SMS 34th Annual International Conference, Strategic Management Society, Madrid, September 20-23, 2014..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Back To The Roots: Inherited Ownership Effects and Spawns’ Performance
2014 (English)In: Strategies in a World of Networks, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes inherited ownership effects, defined as socialization benefits that employees acquire while working in privately-held firms that may be transferred to a spawn. We test for inherited ownership effects in the population of Swedish entrepreneurial spawns competing in medium-high and high technology manufacturing industries. Preliminary results show that spawns of family-owned businesses survive at a higher rate than spawns of non-family-owned businesses. Moreover, spawns that share family ties with the parent company survive at a higher rate than spawns started by non-family members. This findings suggest the existence of inherited ownership effects that influence the performance of new firms.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29248 (URN)
Conference
SMS 34th Annual International Conference, Strategic Management Society, Madrid, September 20-23, 2014.
Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
Zahra, S. A., Naldi, L., Larraneta, B. & Criaco, G. (2014). Industry knowledge and new venture survival. In: : . Paper presented at The 34th Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference (BCERC), London, Canada, June 4-7, 2014..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industry knowledge and new venture survival
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29249 (URN)
Conference
The 34th Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference (BCERC), London, Canada, June 4-7, 2014.
Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Criaco, G. & Nordqvist, M. (2014). Inherited ownership effects and spawns' survival. In: : . Paper presented at 10th EIASM Workshop on Family Firms Management Research, Bergamo, 23-24 May, 2014..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inherited ownership effects and spawns' survival
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29251 (URN)
Conference
10th EIASM Workshop on Family Firms Management Research, Bergamo, 23-24 May, 2014.
Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3671-7463

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