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Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Wilinska, M., de Hontheim, A. & Anbäcken, E.-M. (2018). Ageism in a cross-cultural perspective: Reflections from the research field. In: Liat Ayalon & Clemens Tesch-Römer (Ed.), Contemporary perspectives on ageism: (pp. 425-440). Cham: Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageism in a cross-cultural perspective: Reflections from the research field
2018 (English)In: Contemporary perspectives on ageism / [ed] Liat Ayalon & Clemens Tesch-Römer, Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2018, p. 425-440Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of researching ageism from a cross-cultural perspective. We discuss the complexity of exploring diverse ageist practices as performed in different parts of the world. We also reflect upon the socio-cultural backgrounds through which researchers filter the experiences of fieldwork and research on various enactments of ageism. The key tenet of our argument is that these two dimensions interact during the fieldwork to create unique frameworks that researchers apply in their studies.

We confront our experiences of researching ageism in Japan, Poland, Sweden, and West Papua to explore the notion that the socio-cultural context matters to the following aspects of ageism: diversity of ageist practices, societal images of later life, and the researchers’ socio-cultural understandings of ageism. We explore the position of researchers who, on the one hand, apply the privileged perspective of a stranger to their fieldwork, and on the other hand, are deeply embedded in their own socio-cultural background, which affects their way of approaching later life and ageism. We conclude with a notion of establishing a “sense of touch” within the field and a discussion recognizing the potential changes that such an approach can bring to the ways we study ageism worldwide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Series
International Perspectives on Aging, ISSN 2197-5841, E-ISSN 2197-585X ; 19
Keywords
Ageism; Cross-cultural practice; Research methods
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39536 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-73820-8_26 (DOI)978-3-319-73819-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-73820-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Krekula, C., Nikander, P. & Wilinska, M. (2018). Multiple marginalizations based on age: Gendered ageism and beyond. In: Liat Ayalon & Clemens Tesch-Römer (Ed.), Contemporary perspectives on ageism: (pp. 33-50). Cham: Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple marginalizations based on age: Gendered ageism and beyond
2018 (English)In: Contemporary perspectives on ageism / [ed] Liat Ayalon & Clemens Tesch-Römer, Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2018, p. 33-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter offers a theoretical contribution to the discussions revolving around multiple marginalizations based on age. Our main focus is on gendered ageism, where vulnerability and marginalization is based on the interaction of age and gender, and its potential to highlight the processes and practices of marginalization. Based on the understanding of ageism as a socio-cultural practice involving privilege, subordination, and inequality, we rework existing conceptualizations of multiple marginalizations and of gendered ageism. The understanding of ageism as a form of doing enmeshed in interlocking power structures draws attention to the importance of socio-cultural context and the dynamics involved in the creation and reproduction of social reality, including social inequalities. This chapter draws on a wide range of existing studies to illustrate and explain this new approach. It concludes with an outline of an applicable research programme that yields novel ways of exploring multiple inequalities in later life and gendered ageism more specifically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Series
International Perspectives on Aging, ISSN 2197-5841, E-ISSN 2197-585X ; 19
Keywords
Age as doing; Ageism; Critical age studies; Gendered ageism; Inequality; Age power; Marginalization
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39537 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-73820-8_3 (DOI)978-3-319-73819-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-73820-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Mosberg Iversen, S., Blaakilde, A. L., Wilinska, M. & Sandvik, K. (2017). Growing old with and via media. MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, 33(63)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growing old with and via media
2017 (English)In: MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, ISSN 0900-9671, E-ISSN 1901-9726, Vol. 33, no 63Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

What we understand at any given time as “old age” may seem to have a very straightforward and factual base. Yet, in the words of Simone de Beauvoir, “as far as our own species is concerned old age is by no means easy to define” (de Beauvoir, 1996, p. 9). Even the most positivist sciences have to admit that old age is a “a heterogeneous event that some individuals tolerate better than others” (Balcombe & Sinclair, 2001, p. 845). That is, “old age” as a biological and physiological phenomenon has many and variable causes that may become visible at differing points in individual lives. Moreover, the phenomenon of ageing cannot be explained by any one universal theory (Balcombe & Sinclair, 2001, pp. 845-846). What it means to be old in a particular society at any given time is, thus, a matter of social and cultural construction that may vary greatly from place to place and at different historical times (Hazan, 1994). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SMiD – Society of Media researchers In Denmark, 2017
National Category
Media and Communications Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38000 (URN)10.7146/mediekultur.v33i63.97011 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Azong, J. A. & Wilinska, M. (2017). Into a footnote: Unpaid care work and the Equality Budget in Scotland. The European Journal of Women's Studies, 24(3), 218-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Into a footnote: Unpaid care work and the Equality Budget in Scotland
2017 (English)In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 218-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the visibility of unpaid care work in Scotland by examining the (non-)development of discourse on unpaid care work in economic policy documents. Drawing on the problem approach to policy analysis, the article engages with the Equality Budget Statements (EBS) as policy documents that not only inform the government’s spending plans but are foremost statements of values and norms pursued by the government. This critical reading reveals that certain discourses give different meanings to women’s lives through the political significance of what remains unproblematized as part of the ensuing care discourse in Scotland. The developing discourse on economic policy and equality suggests that equality in Scotland is presupposed on labour market participation. This shrinks discourse on unpaid care work; the problem of unpaid care work is silenced, while the problem of women’s access to employment is redefined to mean a problem of difference and costly childcare only. The way certain issues have or have not appeared in governmental documents is explanatory of the importance and relevance of unpaid care work to the political discourse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Discourse analysis, equality, gender equality, government budgets, Scotland, unpaid care work
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29801 (URN)10.1177/1350506816643731 (DOI)000407060300003 ()2-s2.0-85026744720 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-05Bibliographically approved
Wilinska, M. (2017). Jaco Hoffman and Katrien Pype (eds.) (2016). Ageing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Spaces and Practices of Care. Bristol: Policy Press, 248 pp. ISBN 978 1 4473 2525 3 (hardback) [Review]. International Journal of Ageing and Later Life
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jaco Hoffman and Katrien Pype (eds.) (2016). Ageing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Spaces and Practices of Care. Bristol: Policy Press, 248 pp. ISBN 978 1 4473 2525 3 (hardback)
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670Article, book review (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38001 (URN)10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.11_2B (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Blaakilde, A. L., Wilinska, M. & Mosberg Iversen, S. (Eds.). (2017). Special issue: Growing old with and via media. MedieKultur: Journal of media and communication research, 33(63). SMiD – Society of Media researchers In Denmark
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Special issue: Growing old with and via media. MedieKultur: Journal of media and communication research, 33(63)
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SMiD – Society of Media researchers In Denmark, 2017
Series
MedieKultur: Journal of media and communication research, ISSN 1901-9726 ; 33(63)
National Category
Media and Communications Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37999 (URN)
Note

Guest editorship of special issue of the journal MedieKultur: Journal of media and communication research.

Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Wilinska, M. & Bülow, P. (2017). “We are on air now”: the emotionality of video-recording in the institutional setting. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 20(4), 343-355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“We are on air now”: the emotionality of video-recording in the institutional setting
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Social Research Methodology, ISSN 1364-5579, E-ISSN 1464-5300, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 343-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article engages with the practice of video recording in social research. We draw on our research of institutional talk to explore the emotionality of video recording in the context of the studied situations. Drawing on insights from Collins’ theory of interaction rituals, we demonstrate a variety of situational moments in which different participants negotiate the presence of a video camera. Our analysis reveals the emotional aspects of negotiating and appropriating the presence of such technologies by all parties involved in the research process. We contribute to and extend the growing body of literature that discusses the meaning of technology for social research by emphasizing the emotionality of using video cameras in social and research practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Video recording, institutional talk, emotions
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29841 (URN)10.1080/13645579.2016.1176315 (DOI)000400990700003 ()2-s2.0-84966526020 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2018-02-08Bibliographically approved
Wilińska, M. (2016). Proud to be a woman: Womanhood, old age, and emotions. Journal of Women & Aging, 28(4), 334-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proud to be a woman: Womanhood, old age, and emotions
2016 (English)In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 334-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article takes its starting point in the discussions regarding intersecting discourses of gender and age and the lived experience of older women. The main objective is to discuss the experience of womanhood among older women and to demonstrate their active role in creating spaces for themselves and their friends and affecting each other. The study is based on narrative interviews with female members of the University of the Third Age (U3A). The main findings describe older women who actively engage with discourses of gender to embark on positive constructions of womanhood. They create their own spaces for women’s activism that are filled with positive emotions mobilized to support each other. This article discusses such findings and their relevance to the study of old age and gender. As a result, it serves as an invitation to think and feel differently about older women and their experience of womanhood.

Keywords
Affective reading; emotions; older women
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29804 (URN)10.1080/08952841.2015.1017431 (DOI)000380238400007 ()27045298 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962469616 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Robertson, J. M., Bowes, A., Gibson, G., McCabe, L., Reynish, E. L., Rutherford, A. C. & Wilińska, M. (2016). Spotlight on Scotland: Assets and opportunities for aging research in a shifting sociopolitical landscape. The Gerontologist, 56(6), 979-989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spotlight on Scotland: Assets and opportunities for aging research in a shifting sociopolitical landscape
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2016 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 979-989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scotland is a small nation, yet it leads the field in key areas of aging research. With the creation of a devolved government with authority over health and social services, the country has witnessed practice and policy developments that offer distinctive opportunities for innovative research. With multidisciplinary groups of internationally recognized researchers, Scotland is able to take advantage of a unique set of opportunities for aging research: a well-profiled population brings opportunities in population data and linkage to understand people’s interactions with health, social care, and other public services; while research on technology and telecare is a distinctive area where Scotland is recognized internationally for using technology to develop effective, high-quality and well-accepted services at relatively low financial cost. The paper also considers free personal care for older people and the national dementia strategy in Scotland. The potential to evaluate the impact of free personal care will provide valuable information for other global health and social care systems. Exploring the impact of the national dementia strategy is another unique area of research that can advance understanding in relation to quality of life and the development of services. The paper concludes that, while Scotland benefits from unique opportunities for progressive public policy and innovative aging research that will provide valuable lessons at the forefront of a globally aging population, the challenges associated with an aging population and increasing cultural diversity must be acknowledged and addressed to ensure that the vision of equality and social justice for all is realized.

Keywords
Care, Dementia, Demography, Diversity and ethnicity, Public policy, Technology
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29803 (URN)10.1093/geront/gnw058 (DOI)000397053200003 ()27053507 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014713349 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Wilinska, M. (2015). An Older Person and New Media in Public Discourses: Impossible Encounters?. In: Jia Zhou & Gavriel Salvendy (Ed.), Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population. Design for Aging: First International Conference, ITAP 2015, Held as Part of HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015. Proceedings, Part I. Paper presented at First International Conference, ITAP 2015, Held as Part of HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015 (pp. 405-413). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Older Person and New Media in Public Discourses: Impossible Encounters?
2015 (English)In: Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population. Design for Aging: First International Conference, ITAP 2015, Held as Part of HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015. Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Jia Zhou & Gavriel Salvendy, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 405-413Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2015
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 9193
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28653 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-20892-3_40 (DOI)2-s2.0-84947209256 (Scopus ID)9783319208916 (ISBN)9783319208923 (ISBN)
Conference
First International Conference, ITAP 2015, Held as Part of HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3916-2977

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