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Lim, E. L., Ong, R. H., Thor, J., Wilińska, M., Andersson-Gäre, B. & Thumboo, J. (2023). An Evaluation of the Relationship between Training of Health Practitioners in a Person-Centred Care Model and their Person-Centred Attitudes. International Journal of Integrated Care, 23(4), Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Evaluation of the Relationship between Training of Health Practitioners in a Person-Centred Care Model and their Person-Centred Attitudes
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Integrated Care, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 23, no 4, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The Esther Network (EN) person-centred care (PCC) advocacy training aims to promote person-centred attitudes among health practitioners in Singapore. This study aimed to assess the relationship between the training and practitioners’ PCC attributes over a 3-month period, and to explore power sharing by examining the PCC dimensions of “caring about the service user as a whole person” and the “sharing of power, control and information”. Methods: A repeated-measure study design utilising the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS), was administered to 437 training participants at three time points – before training (T1), immediately after (T2) and three months after training (T3). A five-statement questionnaire captured knowledge of person-centred care at T1 and T2. An Overall score, Caring and Sharing sub-scores were derived from the PPOS. Scores were ranked and divided into three groups (high, medium and low). Ordinal Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) model analysed changes in PPOS scores over time. Results: A single, short-term training appeared to result in measurable improvements in person-centredness of health practitioners, with slight attenuation at T3. There was greater tendency to “care” than to “share power” with service users across all three time points, but the degree of improvement was larger for sharing after training. The change in overall person-centred scores varied by sex and profession (females score higher than males, allied health showed a smaller attenuation at T3). Conclusion: Training as a specific intervention, appeared to have potential to increase health practitioners’ person-centredness but the aspect of equalising power was harder to achieve within a hierarchical structure and clinician-centric culture. An ongoing network to build relationships, and a supportive system to facilitate individual and organisational reflexivity can reinforce learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ubiquity Press, 2023
Keywords
advocacy, coproduction, integrated care, person-centred care, power, practitioners, training, article, attitude, care behavior, controlled study, female, health practitioner, human, knowledge, learning, male, physician, questionnaire, Singapore
National Category
Nursing Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63032 (URN)10.5334/ijic.7564 (DOI)2-s2.0-85178114411 (Scopus ID)GOA;intsam;920193 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;920193 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;920193 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-12-11 Created: 2023-12-11 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Allgurin, M. & Enell, S. (2023). Battling parenting: The consequences of secure care interventions on parents. Child & Family Social Work, 28(1), 108-116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Battling parenting: The consequences of secure care interventions on parents
2023 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Secure care in Sweden is the most intrusive child welfare intervention, and children and their family members have restricted contact. For each child in secure care, there are at least twice as many affected family members and parents who must manage the consequences of this institutionalization. Clearly, it is just as important to understand how secure care affects parents as it is to understand how secure care affects children. To address this issue, we conducted in-depth interviews with 11 parents to eight children who had been placed in secure care during their childhood, focusing on the institutional and societal structures that affected these parents and their parenting. With a narrative approach, stories alluding to a metaphor of war are identified. These stories reveal how all parents (but especially single mothers) are affected by their diverse socio-economic positions and the rigid frames of family life presumed by child welfare interventions. In these narratives, parenting emerges as a social practice rather than a skill. Above all, the stories demonstrate a great deal of vulnerability and sensitivity of parenting. The findings raise critical questions about the meaning and overarching consequences of institutional interventions in a family life. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
child welfare, ethnicity, gender, institutions, parenting, social class, article, child, child parent relation, childhood, clinical article, family life, female, human, interview, literature, narrative, single parent, skill, vulnerability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58053 (URN)10.1111/cfs.12945 (DOI)000822256900001 ()2-s2.0-85133643145 (Scopus ID)HOA;;822886 (Local ID)HOA;;822886 (Archive number)HOA;;822886 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-07-26 Created: 2022-07-26 Last updated: 2023-02-21Bibliographically approved
Wilińska, M. & Thoresen, S. (2023). Editorial. Nordic Social Work Research, 13(3), 365-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial
2023 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 365-365Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62883 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2023.2272369 (DOI)001099800900001 ()2-s2.0-85175617891 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Thoresen, S. H., Allgurin, M., Gubrium, E., Svenlin, A.-R. -. & Anand, J. C. (2023). Spring 2023. Nordic Social Work Research, 13(2), 175-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spring 2023
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2023 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 175-175Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61429 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2023.2214018 (DOI)001026166600001 ()2-s2.0-85161240515 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-21 Created: 2023-06-21 Last updated: 2023-08-22Bibliographically approved
Allgurin, M., Anand, J. C., Gubrium, E., Svenlin, A.-R. -. & Thoresen, S. H. (2023). The ‘social’ in social work. Nordic Social Work Research, 13(1), 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ‘social’ in social work
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2023 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59965 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2023.2176015 (DOI)001026167500001 ()2-s2.0-85148442774 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-07 Created: 2023-03-07 Last updated: 2023-08-18Bibliographically approved
Bülow, P. H., Finkel, D., Allgurin, M., Torgé, C. J., Jegermalm, M., Ernsth-Bravell, M. & Bülow, P. (2022). Aging of severely mentally ill patients first admitted before or after the reorganization of psychiatric care in Sweden. International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 16(1), Article ID 35.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aging of severely mentally ill patients first admitted before or after the reorganization of psychiatric care in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems, E-ISSN 1752-4458, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The concept of deinstitutionalization started in the 1960s in the US to describe closing down or reducing the number of beds in mental hospitals. The same process has been going on in many countries but with different names and in various forms. In Europe, countries like Italy prescribed by law an immediate ban on admitting patients to mental hospitals while in some other European countries psychiatric care was reorganized into a sectorized psychiatry characterized by open psychiatric care. This sectorization has not been studied to the same extent as the radical closures of mental hospitals, even though it entailed major changes in the organization of care. The deinstitutionalization in Sweden is connected to the sectorization of psychiatric care, a protracted process taking years to implement.

METHODS: Older people, with their first admission to psychiatric care before or after the sectorization process, were followed using three different time metrics: (a) year of first entry into a mental hospital, (b) total years of institutionalization, and (c) changes resulting from aging. Data from surveys in 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 were used, together with National registers.

RESULTS: Examination of date of first institutionalization and length of stay indicates a clear break in 1985, the year when the sectorization was completed in the studied municipality. The results show that the two groups, despite belonging to the same age group (birthyears 1910-1951, mean birthyear 1937), represented two different patient generations. The pre-sectorization group was institutionalized at an earlier age and accumulated more time in institutions than the post-sectorization group. Compared to the post-sectorization group, the pre-sectorization group were found to be disadvantaged in that their level of functioning was lower, and they had more unmet needs, even when diagnosis was taken into account.

CONCLUSIONS: Sectorization is an important divide which explains differences in two groups of the same age but with different institutional history: "modern" and "traditional" patient generations that received radically different types of care. The results indicate that the sectorization of psychiatric care might be as important as the Mental Health Care Reform of 1995, although a relatively quiet revolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Deinstitutionalization, Longitudinal, Older people, Sectorization, Severe mental illness
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-57967 (URN)10.1186/s13033-022-00544-9 (DOI)000824694400001 ()35831905 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134237153 (Scopus ID)GOA;;822622 (Local ID)GOA;;822622 (Archive number)GOA;;822622 (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, STYA‑2015/0003
Available from: 2022-07-18 Created: 2022-07-18 Last updated: 2023-10-02Bibliographically approved
Heikkinen, S. & Wilińska, M. (2022). Dancing My Age: Emotions, Interactions, and Bodily Sensations. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 4, Article ID 804888.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dancing My Age: Emotions, Interactions, and Bodily Sensations
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 4, article id 804888Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While there is a growing body of research on the social aspects of older people's dance, studies focusing on emotions are rare. In this study, we use an interactionist sociological perspective to examine the role of emotions in older social dancers' experiences in Sweden. Through qualitative interviews with 29 active or previously active dancers, we found that their experiences of emotional energy and experiences of flow override concerns of age and aging. Age, however, did become significant as the age differences at dance events could bring forth feelings of alienation associated with feeling old. In addition, cultural and gendered norms of appropriate age differences between dancing partners produced shame and pride as well as feelings of being either old or young. Moreover, certain bodily experiences were interpreted in terms of age. Overall, the study contributes to the discussions of the complexity of subjective experiences of age by highlighting its emotional aspects through social partner dancing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
aging, dance, emotionally perceived age, felt age, older people, social interaction, sociology of emotions
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-56179 (URN)10.3389/fspor.2022.804888 (DOI)000783620400001 ()35350583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127253598 (Scopus ID)GOA;;806208 (Local ID)GOA;;806208 (Archive number)GOA;;806208 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-04-11 Created: 2022-04-11 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Anand, J. C., Thoresen, S. H., Gubrium, E., Allgurin Wilińska, M. & Solstad, A. (2022). Editorial. Nordic Social Work Research, 12(5), 611-611
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial
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2022 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 611-611Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59392 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2022.2158568 (DOI)001026169800001 ()2-s2.0-85145503259 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-17 Created: 2023-01-17 Last updated: 2023-08-18Bibliographically approved
Lim, E. L., Khee, G. Y., Thor, J., Andersson-Gäre, B., Thumboo, J. & Allgurin, M. (2022). How the Esther Network model for coproduction of person-centred health and social care was adopted and adapted in Singapore: a realist evaluation. BMJ Open, 12(12), Article ID e059794.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How the Esther Network model for coproduction of person-centred health and social care was adopted and adapted in Singapore: a realist evaluation
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2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e059794Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The Esther Network (EN) model, a person-centred care innovation in Sweden, was adopted in Singapore to promote person-centredness and improve integration between health and social care practitioners. This realist evaluation aimed to explain its adoption and adaptation in Singapore. DESIGN: An organisational case study using a realist evaluation approach drawing on Greenhalgh et al (2004)'s Diffusion of Innovations in Service Organisations to guide data collection and analysis. Data collection included interviews with seven individuals and three focus groups (including stakeholders from the macrosystem, mesosystem and microsystem levels) about their experiences of EN in Singapore, and field notes from participant observations of EN activities. SETTING: SingHealth, a healthcare cluster serving a population of 1.37 million residents in Eastern Singapore. PARTICIPANTS: Policy makers (n=4), EN programme implementers (n=3), practitioners (n=6) and service users (n=7) participated in individual interviews or focus group discussions. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome data from healthcare institutions (n=13) and community agencies (n=59) were included in document analysis. RESULTS: Singapore's ageing population and need to transition from a hospital-based model to a more sustainable community-based model provided an opportunity for change. The personalised nature and logic of the EN model resonated with leaders and led to collective adoption. Embedded cultural influences such as the need for order and hierarchical structures were both barriers to, and facilitators of, change. Coproduction between service users and practitioners in making care improvements deepened the relationships and commitments that held the network together. CONCLUSIONS: The enabling role of leaders (macrosystem level), the bridging role of practitioners (mesosystem level) and the unifying role of service users (microsystem level) all contributed to EN's success in Singapore. Understanding these roles helps us understand how staff at various levels can contribute to the adoption and adaptation of EN and similar complex innovations systemwide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care, Hospitals, Humans, Singapore, Social Support, Sweden, health care delivery, hospital, human, Change management, HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT, Organisation of health services, PUBLIC HEALTH, Quality in health care
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59346 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2021-059794 (DOI)000924543900004 ()36564117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144635484 (Scopus ID)GOA;intsam;852319 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;852319 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;852319 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Thoresen, S. H., Anand, J. C., Gubrium, E., Wilińska, M. & Svenlin, A.-R. (2022). Introducing the new editors of Nordic social work research. Nordic Social Work Research, 12(1), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing the new editors of Nordic social work research
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2022 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-56183 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2022.2047313 (DOI)2-s2.0-85127246363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-11 Created: 2022-04-11 Last updated: 2022-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3916-2977

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