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Sunnergren, O., Ahonen, H., Holmstrom, M. & Broström, A. (2023). Active anterior rhinomanometry: A study on nasal airway resistance, paradoxical reactions to decongestion, and repeatability in healthy subjects. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology (LIO), 8(5), 1136-1145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active anterior rhinomanometry: A study on nasal airway resistance, paradoxical reactions to decongestion, and repeatability in healthy subjects
2023 (English)In: Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology (LIO), E-ISSN 2378-8038, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 1136-1145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Anterior active rhinomanometry (AAR) is widely used in Swedish routine clinical practice to decide if septoplasty is necessary. The scientific basis for the method needs to be strengthened. Therefore, the aims were to evaluate nasal airway resistance (NAR), paradoxical reactions to pharmacological decongestion, and test-retest characteristics of the Rhino-Comp (R) AAR in healthy subjects.

Methods: A prospective longitudinal design was used. AAR was performed before and after decongestion at baseline and after >= 6 months on 60 healthy volunteers. The relationships between NAR, height, weight, BMI, sex, and allergic rhinitis were evaluated by regression analyses. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate paradoxical reactions. Test-retest and repeatability characteristics were evaluated with intra-class coefficients (ICC), Cronbach's alpha, and standard error of measurement.

Results: No statistically significant differences were found between genders or nasal cavity sides. NAR was statistically significantly related to height. Short- and long-term test-retest characteristics were good with ICC and Cronbach's alpha > .75. The minimal significant difference in NAR Log10V2 values between the two measurements was 0.11 and 0.09 (long- and short-term). Paradoxical reactions to pharmacological decongestion were rare, mostly weak, and not evidently reproducible.

Conclusion: In this study, we report reference data for healthy subjects, test-retest capabilities, and the minimal relevant difference between two measurements for the Rhino-Comp (R) AAR, information that is vital and necessary for the appropriate use of AAR in clinical practice. An effective method for pharmacological decongestion is described and recommended for future studies and clinical practice. Paradoxical reactions to pharmacological decongestants exist but maybe without clinical significance.

Level of Evidence: NA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
active anterior rhinomanometry, nasal airway resistance, paradoxical reaction, pharmacological decongestion, Rhino-Comp (R)
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62704 (URN)10.1002/lio2.1157 (DOI)001074826800001 ()37899860 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173459475 (Scopus ID)GOA;;911459 (Local ID)GOA;;911459 (Archive number)GOA;;911459 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-10-23 Created: 2023-10-23 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Nguyen, M. Q., Broström, A., Iversen, M. M., Harboe, K. & Paulsen, A. (2023). Assessing the content validity of the Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire in surgically treated ankle fracture patients: a qualitative study. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 18(1), Article ID 941.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the content validity of the Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire in surgically treated ankle fracture patients: a qualitative study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, ISSN 1749-799X, E-ISSN 1749-799X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Roughly 10% of fractures in adults are ankle fractures. These injuries are found in both sexes and present with different fracture characteristics. The treatment varies with the patients’ biology and fracture type, and the goals are to restore stability, prevent pain and maintain ankle function. Clinicians generally use outcomes like assessment of radiography, pain level, or function. The use of patient-reported outcome measures is increasing, and the Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) has been shown to have good measurement properties when validated in patients with foot and ankle disorders. However, the instrument has not been validated for ankle fracture patients. This study aims to assess the content validity of the items in MOXFQ in surgically treated ankle fracture patients. Methods: A qualitative deductive design was used to investigate patients’ response process of the MOXFQ. Individual interviews were conducted using cognitive interviewing based on the theoretical framework of the 4-step model by Tourangeau. Adult patients that were surgically treated for an ankle fracture between four weeks and 18 months were purposively sampled, and interviews followed a semi-structured interview guide. The predetermined categories were comprehension, retrieval, judgement, and response. Results: Seventeen respondents (65% females) were interviewed. Respondents’ age ranged from 27 to 76 years. Some of the respondents in the early recovery phase were limited by post-operative restrictions and did not find the items in the walking/standing domain relevant. Respondents that were allowed weight-bearing as tolerated (WBAT) were able to recall relevant information for most items. Respondents with time since surgery more than 12 months had less pain and remembered fewer relevant episodes in the recall period. Items in the social interaction domain contained ambiguous questions and were generally considered less important by respondents. The summary index score lacked important concepts in measuring overall quality of life. Conclusions: Pain was a central concept in the post-operative recovery of ankle fracture patients. The MOXFQ-subscales for pain and walking/standing had acceptable content validity in patients that were allowed WBAT. The social interaction-subscale and the summary index score had insufficient content validity for this patient population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Ankle fractures, Content validity, Patient-reported outcome measures, Qualitative research, Validation study
National Category
Orthopaedics Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63081 (URN)10.1186/s13018-023-04418-9 (DOI)001117941300003 ()38066592 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178904324 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;922043 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;922043 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;922043 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, S., Knutsson, S., Hodges, E. A., Sherwood, G., Broström, A. & Björk, M. (2023). Development of caring behaviour in undergraduate nursing students participating in a caring behaviour course. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of caring behaviour in undergraduate nursing students participating in a caring behaviour course
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In today's complex healthcare organisations there is an increasing recognition of the need to enhance care quality and patient safety. Nurses' competence in demonstrating caring behaviour during patient encounters affects how patients experience and participate in their care. Nurse educators are faced with the challenge of balancing the demand for increasingly complex knowledge and skills with facilitating students' abilities essential to becoming compassionate and caring nurses.

AIM: The aim was to describe undergraduate nursing students' development of caring behaviour while participating in a caring behaviour course.

METHOD: This pilot study used a quantitative observational design. At a university in Sweden, video-recorded observational data from twenty-five students were collected in the first and last weeks of a full-time five-week Caring Behaviour Course (the CBC). In total, 56-min video-recorded simulation interactions between a student and a standardised patient were coded by a credentialed coder using a timed-event sequential continuous coding method based on the Caring Behaviour Coding Scheme (the CBCS). The CBCS maps the five conceptual domains described in Swanson's Theory of Caring with related sub-domains that align with Swanson's qualities of the Compassionate Healer and the Competent Practitioner. The CBCS contains seventeen verbal and eight non-verbal behavioural codes, categorised as caring or non-caring.

RESULTS: Between the two simulations, most verbal caring behaviours increased, and most non-verbal caring behaviours decreased. Statistically significant differences between the simulations occurred in the sub-domains Avoiding assumptions and Performing competently/skilfully in the quality of the Competent Practitioner. Most observed caring behaviours aligned with the Compassionate Healer.

CONCLUSION: Generally, the students' development of caring behaviours increased while participating in the CBC. Using a structured observational behavioural coding scheme can assist educators in assessing caring behaviour both in education and in practice, supporting caring as the universal foundation of nursing and a key to patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Swanson's theory of caring, caring behaviour, nursing education, observational coding scheme, observational method, simulation, standardised patient
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61667 (URN)10.1111/scs.13189 (DOI)001019278500001 ()37350361 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162910262 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;888183 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;888183 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;888183 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-08-14
Hellström, P., Israelsson, J., Hellström, A., Hjelm, C., Broström, A. & Årestedt, K. (2023). Is insomnia associated with self-reported health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors? A cross-sectional survey. Resuscitation Plus, 15, Article ID 100455.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is insomnia associated with self-reported health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors? A cross-sectional survey
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2023 (English)In: Resuscitation Plus, E-ISSN 2666-5204, Vol. 15, article id 100455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Insomnia symptoms seem to be common in cardiac arrest survivors but their associations with important outcomes such as self-reported health and life satisfaction have not previously been reported during the early post-event period. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether symptoms of insomnia are associated with self-reported health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors six months after the event.

METHODS: This multicentre cross-sectional survey included cardiac arrest survivors ≥18 years. Participants were recruited six months after the event from five hospitals in southern Sweden, and completed a questionnaire including the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale, EQ-5D-5L, Health Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Satisfaction With Life Scale. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test, linear regression, and ordinal logistic regression. The regression analyses were adjusted for demographic and medical factors.

RESULTS: In total, 212 survivors, 76.4% males, with a mean age of 66.6 years (SD = 11.9) were included, and of those, 20% reported clinical insomnia. Insomnia was significantly associated with all aspects of self-reported health (p < 0.01) and life satisfaction (p < 0.001), except mobility (p = 0.093), self-care (p = 0.676), and usual activities (p = 0.073).

CONCLUSION: Insomnia plays a potentially important role for both health and life satisfaction in cardiac arrest survivors. Screening for sleep problems should be part of post cardiac arrest care and follow-up to identify those in need of further medical examination and treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Health, Insomnia, Life satisfaction, Psychological distress, Quality of life, Sleep
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62384 (URN)10.1016/j.resplu.2023.100455 (DOI)37662641 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169592850 (Scopus ID)GOA;;901510 (Local ID)GOA;;901510 (Archive number)GOA;;901510 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-09-11Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, L., Gustafsson, U., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Wallström, L. & Broström, A. (2023). Neonatal Resuscitation: A Critical Incident Technique Study Exploring Pediatric Registered Nurses' Experiences and Actions. Advances in Neonatal Care, 23(3), 220-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neonatal Resuscitation: A Critical Incident Technique Study Exploring Pediatric Registered Nurses' Experiences and Actions
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2023 (English)In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 220-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Teamwork during neonatal resuscitation is essential. Situations arise quickly and unexpectedly and are highly stressful, requiring pediatric registered nurses (pRN) to respond effectively and in a structured manner. In Sweden, pRNs work in all pediatric settings including the neonatal intensive care unit. The experience and actions of pRNs are seldom explored, and studies within this area could develop and improve strategies for neonatal resuscitation situations.

PURPOSE: To describe pRNs' experiences and actions during neonatal resuscitation.

METHODS: A qualitative interview study based on the critical incident technique was performed. Sixteen pRNs from 4 neonatal intensive care units in Sweden were interviewed.

RESULTS: Critical situations were divided into 306 experiences and 271 actions. pRNs' experiences were divided into 2 categories: individual- and team-focused experiences. Critical situations were managed by individual- or team-focused actions.Experiences revealed were variation of alarms, psychological impact, parental presence, structured working methods, the team's interactions, professional experience and resource availability, and the impact of the environment. Actions revealed were being prepared, managing the psychological impact, adopting a professional attitude toward parents, working in a structured way, and competence/resource reinforcement.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Developing a structured role distribution within the neonatal resuscitation program and ensuring clear communication in the team during simulation training and in intense situations can increase pRNs' feeling of safety and allow them to further develop their professional role in neonatal resuscitation situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
Keywords
infant, interview, neonatal intensive care, neonatal resuscitation, neonatology, nursing, pediatric nurses, qualitative research, teamwork
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60524 (URN)10.1097/ANC.0000000000001063 (DOI)000994386700009 ()36905225 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160211653 (Scopus ID)HOA;;882832 (Local ID)HOA;;882832 (Archive number)HOA;;882832 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-05-30 Created: 2023-05-30 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Öberg, S., Johansson, L., Georgsson, M., Sandberg, J. & Broström, A. (2023). Primary care patients with cardiovascular disease eligible for nurse-led internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Characteristics and motives for participation. Nursing Open, 10(7), 4676-4689
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary care patients with cardiovascular disease eligible for nurse-led internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Characteristics and motives for participation
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2023 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 4676-4689Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe demographic, physical and psychological characteristics associated with insomnia in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) participating in nurse-led Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (I-CBTI), and their motives and expectations regarding participation in I-CBTI.

Design: A mixed method design was applied, including primary care patients with angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter or arrhythmia in southern Sweden.

Methods: Data on demographics, insomnia severity and physical and psychological characteristics were collected through self-rated validated questionnaires (n = 126). Motives and expectations were collected through interviews (n = 19) and analysed using the ‘personas’ model.

Results: Physical symptoms and psychological characteristics were associated with insomnia. Three personas were identified: the pragmatist (a curious and optimistic persona), the philosopher (a problem-solving persona) and the philanthropist (an altruistic persona). Expectations were positive among the three personas, but comorbid conditions reduced the perceived ability to make necessary behavioural changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
cardiac disease, characteristics, cognitive behavioural therapy, insomnia, internet-based intervention, mixed method design, nurse-led, sleep problems
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60058 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1717 (DOI)000952996600001 ()36929685 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150835055 (Scopus ID)GOA;;873445 (Local ID)GOA;;873445 (Archive number)GOA;;873445 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Koldestam, M., Rolander, B., Broström, A., Lindqvist, G. & Knutsson, S. (2023). Undergraduate nursing student's attitudes to learning during clinical practice in different semesters when using a conceptual learning model grounded in a caritative caring perspective: A cross-sectional study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing student's attitudes to learning during clinical practice in different semesters when using a conceptual learning model grounded in a caritative caring perspective: A cross-sectional study
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe undergraduate nursing students' attitudes to learning during clinical practice in different semesters when using the conceptual learning model, Model for Improvements in Learning Outcomes (MILO) grounded in a caritative caring perspective. Background: With the intention to support interlinking between theory and praxis and offer understanding and structure to facilitate learning, MILO, theoretically grounded in hermeneutics and a caritative caring perspective based on ethical values, was implemented. MILO consists of four contextual concepts (peer learning, co-clinical teachers, student-centred and student-active supervision) and four intrapersonal concepts (nursing, a reflective approach, a critical approach, quality and safety). Methods: A descriptive comparative quantitative study design was applied at a Swedish university, 3 hospitals and 13 municipalities in one county. Cross-sectional data collected via a questionnaire developed to assess attitudes to learning related to MILO's contextual and intrapersonal concepts and their applications were used. Results: 209 students in semester 3, 4 and 6 participated in 6 different clinical practice courses. In comparison, intrapersonal concepts, that is, the student's own characteristics and abilities were viewed to be of greater value for learning than contextual, that is, organisational-related concepts in all semesters. Understanding the needs of others and reflective learning were rated to be of major importance. Students in semester 3 valued the use of the applications the highest. To be supervised in pairs was rated the lowest in semester 6. Some of the concepts and their applications were to great extent not applied. Conclusions: In all semesters, fundamentals in caritative caring and characteristics and abilities related to the individual student were rated to be of greater importance for learning than environmental support. Providing students opportunities to develop independency seems essential. Use of a learning model such as MILO is dependent on a bearing of a caritative caring culture and a shared understanding between all involved in student learning during clinical practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
attitudes, caring culture, caritas, clinical practice, concepts, implementation, learning, learning models, questionnaire
National Category
Learning Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63038 (URN)10.1111/scs.13229 (DOI)001111904700001 ()38041229 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178389357 (Scopus ID)HOA;;920243 (Local ID)HOA;;920243 (Archive number)HOA;;920243 (OAI)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden, 859991/964201/974852
Available from: 2023-12-12 Created: 2023-12-12 Last updated: 2023-12-15
Mårtensson, S., Knutsson, S., Hodges, E. A., Sherwood, G., Broström, A. & Björk, M. (2023). Undergraduate nursing students' experiences of practicing caring behaviours with standardised patients. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 37(1), 271-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing students' experiences of practicing caring behaviours with standardised patients
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale

Undergraduate nursing students' learning opportunities to practice caring behaviours to assure compassionate and competent nursing practice with standardised patients are few. Earlier studies primarily focused on practicing communication skills in relation to mental health or developing psychomotor skills while caring for a patient with a specific diagnosis.

Aim

The study aim was to describe undergraduate nursing students' experiences of practicing caring behaviours with a standardised patient.

Method

A sample of forty-eight undergraduate nursing students in semester four at a school of nursing in southern Sweden, enrolled in a full-time, 5-week, on-campus elective caring behaviour course, were at the first and last week individually video-recorded during two caring behaviour simulations encountering a standardised patient. After observing each of their video-recordings, students completed written reflections focusing on their own compassionate and competent verbal and nonverbal caring behaviour. In total, 96 individual written reflections were analysed using qualitative content analysis to describe the experience.

Results

One main theme emerged: The challenge of being mindfully present in patient encounters. Four themes further described the experience: A challenging but realistic learning experience, learning the impact of nonverbal behaviour, recognising the complexity of verbal behaviour, and learning to be with the patient instead of only doing for the patient.

Conclusion

When caring is intertwined with visible and realistic nursing practice in simulations using standardised patients it facilitates undergraduate nursing students learning compassionate and competent caring behaviour. The learning experience opened the students' eyes to the impact of practicing caring, recognising that being with is not the same as doing for the patient, and thus, how challenging it is to be mindfully present in patient encounters. Designing caring behaviour simulations with standardised patients is a feasible and efficacious educational learning didactic to facilitate students' learning caring behaviour and enhancing patients' experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
caring behaviours, nursing education, qualitative content analysis, reflective practice, simulation, standardised patient, Swanson's Theory of Caring
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-56172 (URN)10.1111/scs.13077 (DOI)000773909300001 ()35348240 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127358707 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;806056 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;806056 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;806056 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-04-08 Created: 2022-04-08 Last updated: 2023-06-29Bibliographically approved
Sunnergren, O., Pakpour, A. H., Bergquist, H., Sahlstrand-Johnson, P., Stjarne, P. & Broström, A. (2023). Validation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology (LIO), 8(2), 357-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale
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2023 (English)In: Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology (LIO), E-ISSN 2378-8038, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale is a symptom-specific quality-of-life questionnaire for patients suffering from nasal obstruction. The instrument is designed specifically for patients with septal deviation and for the evaluation of the outcome of septoplasty. The aim of this study was to validate a Swedish version of the NOSE instrument for use in clinical practice and research.Methods: A Swedish version of the NOSE was tested in a case group consisting of 125 subjects with nasal obstruction (of which 31 underwent septoplasty) and a control group consisting of 65 healthy subjects. Base line data for the case and control groups were used to evaluate face validity, known groups validity, construct validity, internal consistency and factor structure analysis. Fifty participants in both the case groups and control groups were assessed both at baseline and after 2 weeks to evaluate test-retest reliability. The participants who underwent septoplasty were assessed at baseline and after 3-6 months to evaluate responsiveness.Results: The S-NOSE was found to be reliable, valid, and responsive. Both Cronbach's alpha and McDonald Omega coefficients were > 0.7, and the intra class coefficient was 0.942. The S-NOSE scores were significantly correlated with nasal patency VAS in both the case group and the control group (p < .001 and p = .018, respectively). After septoplasty, the mean S-NOSE score were significantly improved (p < .001). Furthermore, the S-NOSE was shown to have excellent and robust psychometric properties.Conclusion: The S-NOSE can be recommended in both clinical practice and research to evaluate the outcome of septoplasty in Swedish-speaking populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
nasal obstruction, NOSE scale, quality of life, septoplasty, Swedish language, validation
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60022 (URN)10.1002/lio2.1036 (DOI)000943984500001 ()37090889 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150364909 (Scopus ID)HOA;;866803 (Local ID)HOA;;866803 (Archive number)HOA;;866803 (OAI)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden, 803421
Available from: 2023-03-24 Created: 2023-03-24 Last updated: 2023-08-25Bibliographically approved
Björk, M., Knutsson, S., Odzakovic, E., Hellström, A., Sandlund, C., Ulander, M., . . . Broström, A. (2023). Validation of two brief instruments (the SURE and CollaboRATE) to measure shared decision-making in patients with restless legs syndrome. Journal of Sleep Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of two brief instruments (the SURE and CollaboRATE) to measure shared decision-making in patients with restless legs syndrome
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterised by an urge to move arms and legs, usually associated with discomfort, pain, motor restlessness, and sleep disturbance. An individually adapted treatment is needed but difficult to optimise, which makes shared decision-making (SDM) important. However, brief validated instruments on how patients with RLS perceive their involvement in treatment decisions are lacking. Therefore, the aim was to validate two instruments, SURE (Sure of myself, Understand information, Risk–benefit ratio, Encouragement, i.e., to assess decisional conflict) and CollaboRATE (brief patient survey focused on SDM, i.e., to assess SDM), in patients with RLS. A cross-sectional design, including 788 participants with RLS (65% females, mean [SD] age 70.8 [11.4] years) from a national patient organisation for RLS, was used. A postal survey was sent out to collect data regarding weight, height, comorbidities, demographics, and RLS-related treatment data. The following instruments were included: the SURE, CollaboRATE, Restless Legs Syndrome-6 Scale, and eHealth Literacy Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models were used to assess the validity and reliability of the SURE and CollaboRATE. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning (DIF) across age, gender, and medication groups were assessed. The SURE and CollaboRATE were both identified as unidimensional instruments with satisfactory internal consistency. No DIF across age and gender was identified, while significant DIF was observed for both the SURE and CollaboRATE regarding medication use categories. However, both the SURE and CollaboRATE are potential instruments to be used in research, but also as reflection tools by healthcare professionals, patients, and students to explore and assess SDM, and support its development in clinical care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
confirmatory factor analysis, decisional conflict, restless legs syndrome, shared decision-making, sleep, validity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62886 (URN)10.1111/jsr.14071 (DOI)001096207800001 ()37909257 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175544341 (Scopus ID)HOA;;915772 (Local ID)HOA;;915772 (Archive number)HOA;;915772 (OAI)
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 969214The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20223144
Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-11-28
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1884-5696

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