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Stadin, M., Nordin, M., Broström, A., Magnusson Hanson, L., Westerlund, H. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods

A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

Results

In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

Conclusion

Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
ICT demands at work; Occupational health; Work-related stress; Self-rated health; Gender differences; Socioeconomic position
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42592 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01407-6 (DOI)XYZ ()30684000 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1141
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-01-29
Lin, C.-Y., Strong, C., Scott, A. J., Broström, A., Pakpour, A. H. & Webb, T. L. (2018). A cluster randomized controlled trial of a theory-based sleep hygiene intervention for adolescents. Sleep, 41(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cluster randomized controlled trial of a theory-based sleep hygiene intervention for adolescents
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2018 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 41, no 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives: To use theory to design and evaluate an intervention to promote sleep hygiene and health among adolescents.

Methods: The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) were used to develop an intervention, which was then evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Participants were high school students (N = 2,841, M age = 15.12, SD = 1.50). Adolescents in the intervention group received four face-to-face sessions providing behavior change techniques targeting the theoretical determinants of sleep hygiene. Adolescents in the control group only received educational material at the end of the study. The primary outcome was sleep hygiene measured at 1 and 6 months postintervention. A number of secondary outcomes were also measured, including beliefs about sleep, self-regulatory processes, and outcomes related to health and wellbeing.

Results: Sleep hygiene was improved in the intervention group when compared with the control group at both follow-up points (coefficients = 0.16 and 0.19, 95% CIs = 0.12-0.20 and 0.15-0.23 at 1 and 6 months, respectively, for scores on the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale), as were psychosocial and general aspects of health. Mediation analyses suggested that beliefs about sleep hygiene as specified by the TPB, along with self-regulatory processes from HAPA, both mediated the effect of the intervention on outcomes. In turn, the effects of the intervention on sleep hygiene mediated its impact on general health.

Conclusions: Healthcare practitioners might consider intervention programs based on the TPB and the HAPA to improve sleep among adolescents.

Clinical Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02551913) https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02551913.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
adolescent, behavior, clustered randomized trial, health, sleep
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42143 (URN)10.1093/sleep/zsy170 (DOI)XYZ ()30423178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056534105 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Strand, M., Broström, A. & Haugstvedt, A. (2018). Adolescents' perceptions of the transition process from parental management to self-management of type 1 diabetes.. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents' perceptions of the transition process from parental management to self-management of type 1 diabetes.
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to describe how adolescents perceive the transition from being dependent on their parents to managing their own type 1 diabetes.

DESIGN: An explorative design with a phenomenographic approach was used.

METHODS: Semistructured interviews took place during 2016-2017 with 18 strategically sampled adolescents (7 boys and 11 girls, aged 16-18 years) with type 1 diabetes from five Norwegian paediatric diabetes centres.

FINDINGS: Three descriptive categories, each comprising three perceptions, emerged: (1) Taking responsibility for own diabetes is a process comprised 'It is natural to take over responsibility for own diabetes', 'Expectations from parents and healthcare personnel', and 'The adolescents want more independence'. (2) Taking responsibility for own diabetes was dependent on coping comprised 'Feeling proud to handle their own diabetes', 'The transition is like a roller coaster', and 'Taking responsibility means that it is your fault if you make mistakes'. (3) It is demanding to take responsibility for own diabetes comprised 'Taking responsibility for own diabetes requires knowledge and skills', 'It is time-consuming to take responsibility for own diabetes', and 'Having responsibility for own diabetes is like being examined every day'.

CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents want to take over the responsibility for their diabetes treatment from their parents, but they need knowledge, experience and skills to succeed. Parents, friends and health professionals are important supporters during the transition.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Health professionals need to know their patients to identify the adolescents' need for support. Self-care is considered essential in the management of diabetes. Education sessions are an important part of the transition to control own diabetes. Such education should also include parents and friends.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
adolescents, interviews, phenomenographic approach, qualitative method, transition, type 1 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41572 (URN)10.1111/scs.12611 (DOI)30152532 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053204767 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Högberg, K. M., Sandman, L., Nyström, M., Stockelberg, D. & Broström, A. (2018). Caring Through Web-Based Communication: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Nursing Intervention to Create Holistic Well-Being Among Patients With Hematological Disease.. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 36(3), 218-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring Through Web-Based Communication: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Nursing Intervention to Create Holistic Well-Being Among Patients With Hematological Disease.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 218-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To examine how written communication between patients with hematological diseases and a nurse within a web-based communication service can be caring.

DESIGN: The study is based on qualitative deductive content analysis of 109 written messages between 10 patients and a responding nurse. The evaluated nursing intervention is a web-based communication service where patients could request support from a responding nurse during 2 months of use. A structured theoretical matrix based on Swanson's theory of caring including compassion, competence, and upholding trust is used for the analysis.

FINDINGS: Nursing compassion emerges when patients share personal matters and the nurse has an opportunity to explicitly display genuine interest and understanding. Nursing competence is required when patients ask for or are in need of information, advice, and emotional support. The nurse can uphold trust when compassion and competence are exhibited and patients share their innermost feelings.

CONCLUSIONS: Web-based communication has the potential to contribute to holistic well-being according to Swanson's theory of caring. The written word lasts, can be read repeatedly, and in connection with writing there is time for reflection. However, the lack of nonverbal cues makes it important that the nurse answers in a fully accurate and explicitly caring way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
caring, informatics, psychosocial/mental health, telehealth
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41483 (URN)10.1177/0898010116667343 (DOI)000441596600003 ()27659277 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026268201 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-18 Created: 2018-09-18 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Pakpour, A. H., Ulander, M. & Nilsen, P. (2018). Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(21-22), 4040-4049
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension.

Design: Cross-sectional design.

Methods: A total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used.

Results: Of the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equation modelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good.

Conclusion: The initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension.

Relevance to Clinical Practice: The PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Behavioural change, Food habits, Hypertension, Obesity, Physical activity, Weight loss
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41558 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14535 (DOI)000446561500021 ()29776007 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051121397 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Hedberg, B., Malm, D., Karlsson, J.-E., Årestedt, K. & Broström, A. (2018). Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 17(5), 446-455
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac arrhythmia. Effective communication of risks (e.g. stroke risk) and benefits of treatment (e.g. oral anticoagulants) is crucial for the process of shared decision making.

Aim:

The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication after a follow-up visit among patients who three months earlier had visited an emergency room for atrial fibrillation related symptoms.

Methods:

A cross-sectional design was used and 322 patients (34% women), mean age 66.1 years (SD 10.5 years) with atrial fibrillation were included in the south of Sweden. Clinical examinations were done post an atrial fibrillation episode. Self-rating scales for communication (Combined Outcome Measure for Risk Communication and Treatment Decision Making Effectiveness), uncertainty in illness (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale–Community), mastery of daily life (Mastery Scale), depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and vitality, physical health and mental health (36-item Short Form Health Survey) were used to collect data.

Results:

Decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, were independently associated with lower confidence in decision making. Absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness were independently associated with lower satisfaction with risk communication. Clinical atrial fibrillation variables or depressive symptoms were not associated with satisfaction with confidence in decision making or satisfaction with risk communication. The final models explained 29.1% and 29.5% of the variance in confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication.

Conclusion:

Confidence in decision making is associated with decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, while absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness are associated with risk communication satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Atrial fibrillation, decision making, patient-based outcome measure, risk communication
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37870 (URN)10.1177/1474515117741891 (DOI)000433529700008 ()29135285 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041497464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Siebmanns, S., Ulander, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, L., Johansson, P. & Broström, A. (2018). Internet-based CBT for insomnia in the general population - a description of design, measurements and interventions in recent RCT studies. Paper presented at 24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018. Journal of Sleep Research, 27(1, SI), 290-291, Article ID P436.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based CBT for insomnia in the general population - a description of design, measurements and interventions in recent RCT studies
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 1, SI, p. 290-291, article id P436Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives/Introduction: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (ICBTi) has been proposed as an effective, accessible, non-pharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorder. The objective was to perform a literature review of published randomized controlled trials (RCT).

Methods: Literature review. PubMed was used to identify RCTs ofICBTi published since 2013. Keywords were insomnia, ICBT and RCT. The search resulted in 40 hits. Papers with study designs and methods not relevant to the objective were removed (n = 29). Reasons for exclusion were: only study protocol, not internet-based, and results based on old data.

Results: Design: Recruitment were done via e-mail, from websites, online ads, and advertisements in local newspapers.

Inclusion criteria: Six studies based their inclusion only on ISI score (from >7to>=15). 3 studies used a combination of ISI and DSM-IV. Two studies used DSM-IV only.

Sample sizes: 4 studies had less than 100 participants, and 2 studies over 200, the mean number was 139 participants (48-303). The mean age varied from 15 to 52 years. Significantly more female participants in all studies.

Data collection: ISI combined with sleep diary was the most commonly used primary or secondary outcome measurements (n =7), 2 used ISI only, and 2 used sleep diary only. Other common instruments were, PSQI, HADS, DBAS-16 and CES-D. All studies had pre- and post-treatment measurements, but none during the intervention. The follow-up-period varied between 8 weeks and 3 years. The most common follow-up time was 6 months (n = 4), with a range from 4 weeks3years.Intervention: Most of the studies (n = 10) used traditional ICBTi-treatments (i.e., stimulus control, sleep restriction, relaxation, sleep hygiene). One study did not include stimulus control. The treatment duration were six weeks (n = 8), eight weeks (n = 2) and nine weeks (n = 1). All except one used therapist guided support.

Results: All studies showed significant post treatment improvements on sleep outcomes.

Conclusions: All studies showed significant improvement with regard to sleep. The total number of participants in the studies was relatively low. Most studies are not based on clinical samples, which may affect the generalizability of the findings.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41659 (URN)000444228300618 ()
Conference
24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, K., Årestedt, K., Broström, A. & Wikström, L. (2018). Nausea intensity as a reflector of early physical recovery after surgery. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nausea intensity as a reflector of early physical recovery after surgery
2018 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: To compare different levels of self-rated average nausea intensity with early physical recovery and determine if nausea can reflect recovery in patients undergoing general or orthopaedic surgery.

Background: Nausea has been found to influence postoperative physical recovery. Despite the incidence of nausea in postoperative care, there is a knowledge gap about the possibility of using average nausea intensity to reflect recovery, motivating further investigation.

Design: An observational design with repeated measures.

Methods: General and orthopaedic patients answered a questionnaire (October 2012–January 2015) about nausea and impact on recovery on postoperative days 1 (N = 479) and 2 (N = 441). Questions about average nausea intensity at rest and during activity were answered based on the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) (0–10). Impact on recovery was evaluated using three dimensions from the postoperative recovery profile tool.

Results: About one-fifth of the patients reported nausea intensity as moderate to severe on days 1 and 2. Nausea intensity was associated with eight of nine aspects of recovery on postoperative day 1. Nausea intensity on day 1 also reflected four of nine aspects of recovery on day 2. About reflecting physical recovery, the association was strongest between nausea intensity and appetite changes.

Conclusions: As postoperative nausea is common, regular assessments by healthcare professionals are needed. Assessment of nausea is of importance since it reflects physical recovery. This also shows the importance of treating nausea without delay. Using the NRS to measure nausea intensity is a simple method that is easy to use in clinic. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
nausea, numeric rating scale, nursing, physical recovery, postoperative care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42336 (URN)10.1111/jan.13893 (DOI)30375009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057897106 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden, 598311Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 376851
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18
Amofah, H. A., Broström, A., Fridlund, B., Haaverstad, R., Instenes, I., Kuiper, K. K., . . . Norekval, T. M. (2018). Octogenarian patients experiences with hypnotics in relation to sleep disturbances and delirium after aortic valve therapy. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 17, 104-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Octogenarian patients experiences with hypnotics in relation to sleep disturbances and delirium after aortic valve therapy
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, p. 104-105Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sleep disturbance and delirium are complications after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI), especially in octogenarian patients. Sedatives and z-hypnotics are medications distributed to promote sleep. However, a knowledge-gap exists on patient experiences with these medications, and sleep and delirium after the cardiac treatment.

Aim: To explore and describe how octogenarians suffering from delirium after SAVR/TAVI experience their sleep situation related to sedatives and z-hypnotics, in a long-term perspective.

Methods An explorative and descriptive design with a longitudinal qualitative approach was applied. Inclusion criteria; age 80+, treated with SAVR or TAVI and had experienced delirium. Information about administration of sedatives and z-hypnotics was collected from the patients journals. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) was used to assess delirium, the Sleep Sufficient Index (SSI) and Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) were used to document self-reported sleep and insomnia. All measures were performed at baseline and daily the five first postoperative days. Ten patients were interviewed 6-12 months after treatment with focus on delirium. Five of these patients were re-interviewed four years later, focusing on their sleep situation.

Findings: For the initial interview, five men and five woman, four after TAVI and six after SAVR, mean age 83 were included. One overarching theme revealed; hours in bed represented an emotional chaos. Three sub-themes described the patients experiences with sleep and delirium, a cascade of distressful experiences, the struggle between sleep and activity and elements influencing sleep. In the category physical sleep distractions, sleep medications emerged as a sleep disturbing element but also to evoke delirium. Patients described to be offered sedatives and z-hypnotics in hospital. However, they did not have a positive experience with this as the medication did not make them sleep better. Moreover, they associated the nightmares by the sedatives Four years after the cardiac treatment, the octogenarian patients described that medication did not have a sleep promoting effect, and they did not want it.

Conclusion: Octogenarian patients are vulnerable to complications like sleep disturbances and delirium. In preventing and treating these conditions, health-care professionals should be aware of the effect and side-effect of sedatives and z-hypnotics in the octogenarian patients. Our findings show that medications should be cautiously used within this group of patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41230 (URN)10.1177/1474515118787764 (DOI)000440339600176 ()
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Wikström, L., Nilsson, M., Broström, A. & Eriksson, K. (2018). Patients’ self-reported nausea: Validation of the Numerical Rating Scale and of a daily summary of repeated Numerical Rating Scale scores. Journal of Clinical Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ self-reported nausea: Validation of the Numerical Rating Scale and of a daily summary of repeated Numerical Rating Scale scores
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim and objectives: To validate the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for postoperative nausea assessments, and determine whether a central tendency, median, based on patients’ self-rated nausea is a clinically applicable daily measure to describe patients’ nausea after major surgery.

Background: Postoperative nausea causes major discomfort, risks for complications and prolonged hospital stays. The NRS is recommended for the assessment of pain but is little explored for assessing nausea.

Design: A repeated measure design was carried out on patients who had undergone major surgery in three Swedish hospitals.

Methods: Nonparametric statistical methods were used to analyse (a) associations between the NRS and a verbal scale (no, mild, moderate and severe) and (b) to analyse associations between Measure 1 (nausea scores postoperative Day 1) and Measure 2 (retrospective nausea scores at rest and during activity, postoperative Day 2). Reporting of this research adheres to the Strobe Guidelines.

Results: The mean age of the 479 patients (44% women) in the sample was 65 years (range, 22–93 years). Self-assessed nausea scores from the NRS and the verbal scale correlated well (rS pearman= 0.79). Correlation between nausea at rest and nausea during activity was rS pearman= 0.81. The calculated median scores (Measure 1) showed only moderate correlations with retrospective nausea scores (Measure 2); 4–9 ratings, rS pearman= 0.41; 6–9 ratings, rS pearman= 0.54.

Conclusions: Numeric Rating Scale scores showed strong associations with a verbal scale; therefore, the NRS seems to be a valid tool to measure nausea intensity. The quality of daily summarised median nausea scores needs to be further explored before clinical use.

Relevance to clinical practice: The use of the NRS in assessments of nausea in postoperative care will facilitate communication between patients and health care professionals regarding nausea intensity. When documenting nausea, it seems unnecessary to distinguish nausea at rest from nausea during activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
assessment, nausea, Numeric Rating Scale, postoperative, validation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42100 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14705 (DOI)2-s2.0-85056162192 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-21
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1884-5696

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