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Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Andersson, M., Larsson, J. P. & Wernberg, J. (2019). The economic microgeography of diversity and specialization externalities – firm-level evidence from Swedish cities. Research Policy, 48(6), 1385-1398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The economic microgeography of diversity and specialization externalities – firm-level evidence from Swedish cities
2019 (English)In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1385-1398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We employ finely geo-coded firm-level panel data to assess the long-standing question whether agglomeration economies derive from specialization (within-industry), diversity (between-industry) or overall density. Rather than treating the city as a single unit, we focus our analysis on how the inner industry structures of cities influence firm-level productivity. Our results illustrate the co-existence of several externalities that differ in their spatial distribution and attenuation within cities. First, we find robust positive effects of neighborhood-level specialization on TFP as well as a small effect of diversity at the same fine spatial level. These effects are highly localized and dissipate beyond the immediate within-city neighborhood level. Second, we also find that firms benefit from the overall density of the wider city. The results emphasize the relevance of “opening up” cities to study the workings of their inner organization and support the idea that location in a within-city industry cluster in a diversified and dense city boosts productivity. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Agglomeration economies, Attenuation, Diversity, Externalities, Geocoding, Knowledge spillovers, Productivity, Specialization, Agglomeration, Geo coding, Industrial economics
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43363 (URN)10.1016/j.respol.2019.02.003 (DOI)000466619400006 ()2-s2.0-85061793039 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J. P. & Thulin, P. (2018). Independent by necessity?: The life satisfaction of necessity and opportunity entrepreneurs in 70 countries. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Independent by necessity?: The life satisfaction of necessity and opportunity entrepreneurs in 70 countries
2018 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The relationship between self-employment and subjective well-being (SWB) is contingent on the heterogeneity observed among entrepreneurs. We argue that independence and job control, two commonly suggested sources of entrepreneurs’ higher SWB, are likely to disproportionately benefit opportunity entrepreneurs who were pulled into their occupation choice. A review of the psychological literature on the determinants of well-being further supports the view that more dynamic and impactful entrepreneurship should lead to higher SWB. Analysis of Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data from 70 countries (N = 111,589) confirm this proposition. We show that entrepreneurs, all else equal, rate their life satisfaction substantially higher than employees and, further, that this effect is entirely driven by opportunity entrepreneurs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Happiness research, Opportunity entrepreneurship, Quality of life, Satisfaction, Subjective well-being
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42104 (URN)10.1007/s11187-018-0110-9 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055978000 (Scopus ID)IHHCEnSEIS (Local ID)IHHCEnSEIS (Archive number)IHHCEnSEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2019-06-07
Andersson, M. O., Larsson, J. P. & Wernberg, J. (2018). Urban preferences, amenities and age: Exploring the spatial distribution of age in Stockholm from 1991 to 2011. Regional Science Policy & Practice, 10(4), 367-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban preferences, amenities and age: Exploring the spatial distribution of age in Stockholm from 1991 to 2011
2018 (English)In: Regional Science Policy & Practice, E-ISSN 1757-7802, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 367-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities exhibit a rich and complex heterogeneity in people and activities. This poses a sizable challenge for planners when planning new neighbourhoods or the reconstruction of old ones as well as when considering the allocation of supply of and demand for amenities, e.g. kindergartens or health facilities. However, individual preferences may also exhibit common denominators that may provide structure to this heterogeneity. One such denominator is age. In this paper we introduce the concept of neighbourhood age, defined as the mean age of people living in exogenously defined squares of 1km2 in a city. We use highly disaggregated geocoded data to map how the spatial distribution of neighbourhood age changes over a 20-year period from 1991 to 2011 in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. We then test the correlation between neighbourhood age and two categories of urban amenities: supply of local consumption amenities and distance to the city's central business district (CBD). The paper presents three main findings: First, neighbourhood age changes and polarizes significantly over the observed period, suggesting that different age groups are concentrating in different parts of the city. Second, there is a rejuvenation in the central parts of the city but also in more distant clusters of amenities. Third, over a long-term perspective, the results suggest that local clusters of consumption amenities outside the inner city may become increasingly attractive to younger people. Our conclusion is that neighbourhood age and age-related patterns over time provides a tool for planners to better understand the spatial distribution of age-related demand. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
changes, development, land use patterns, regional economic activity: growth, size and spatial distributions of regional economic activity
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42200 (URN)10.1111/rsp3.12150 (DOI)000451337900009 ()2-s2.0-85055474118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J. P. & Westlund, H. (2017). Betydelsen av socialt kapital för entreprenörskap: Regional utveckling i en polariserad tid. Örebro: Entreprenörskapsforum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betydelsen av socialt kapital för entreprenörskap: Regional utveckling i en polariserad tid
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Entreprenörskapsforum, 2017. p. 7
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38440 (URN)
Note

Policysammanfattning från Entreprenörskapsforum

Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J. P., Wennberg, K., Wiklund, J. & Wright, M. (2017). Location choices of graduate entrepreneurs. Research Policy, 46(8), 1490-1504
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Location choices of graduate entrepreneurs
2017 (English)In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1490-1504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We review complementary theoretical perspectives on location choices of university graduate entrepreneurs derived from the individual-opportunity nexus and local embeddedness perspectives on entrepreneurship. Analysis of the full population of 215,388 graduates from Swedish institutions of higher education between 2002 and 2006 provides support for both location choice perspectives. Overall, 63% of graduate entrepreneurs start businesses locally in their region of graduation while 37% start businesses elsewhere. The likelihood of starting locally is substantially higher in metropolitan regions, if the graduate was born locally or has university peer entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial family members in the region of graduation. Implications for theory and public policy are discussed. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Location choice, Universities, Location, Embeddedness, Institutions of higher educations, Metropolitan regions, Swedishs, University graduates, Education
National Category
Economic Geography Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37219 (URN)10.1016/j.respol.2017.07.004 (DOI)000412035200010 ()2-s2.0-85025085482 (Scopus ID)IHHövrigtIS (Local ID)IHHövrigtIS (Archive number)IHHövrigtIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J. P. (2017). Non-routine activities and the within-city geography of jobs. Urban Studies, 54(8), 1808-1833
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-routine activities and the within-city geography of jobs
2017 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 54, no 8, p. 1808-1833Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Externalities are believed to drive the productivity benefits of cities, and also of dense sub-parts within cities, e.g. the central business district (CBD). Recent research claims that density externalities accrue mostly to non-routine activities, and that their effects, e.g. human capital spillovers, attenuate sharply with distance. Consistent with these claims, I demonstrate strong clustering tendencies in non-routine professions as evidenced by job-switching patterns, specifically switchers’ distances moved between employers. Individual-level geo-coded data for switchers within Sweden’s metropolitan areas are used to illustrate that employees hired to non-routine occupations tend to switch to jobs close to the previous work establishment, while blue collar workers show dispersion. The differences are chiefly explained by (1) non-routine activities concentrate in the CBD (the strongest effect) and local employment centres, (2) non-routine activities cluster also outside of centres, and (3) industry-specific effects. The patterns are consistent with the importance of sharply attenuating non-market interactions (e.g. knowledge spillovers) in the production of non-routine products and services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
agglomeration, city planning, human capital externalities, job-switching, matching
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36606 (URN)10.1177/0042098016643266 (DOI)000403460300003 ()2-s2.0-85019904520 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-04 Created: 2017-07-04 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Larsson, J. P. & Wernberg, J. (2017). Närhet och nätverk: Urbaniseringens roll utanför storstäderna. Malmö: Fastighetsägarna Syd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Närhet och nätverk: Urbaniseringens roll utanför storstäderna
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Fastighetsägarna Syd, 2017. p. 38
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38438 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. & Larsson, J. P. (2017). Näringslivsdynamik, städer och agglomerationsekonomier – forskningsöversikt och agenda. Östersund: Myndigheten för tillväxtpolitiska utvärderingar och analyser
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Näringslivsdynamik, städer och agglomerationsekonomier – forskningsöversikt och agenda
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Myndigheten för tillväxtpolitiska utvärderingar och analyser, 2017. p. 74
Series
PM ; 2017:08
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38441 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Westlund, H. & Larsson, J. P. (Eds.). (2016). Handbook of social capital and regional development. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handbook of social capital and regional development
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016. p. 559
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38435 (URN)978-1-78347-682-4 (ISBN)978-1-78347-683-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Klaesson, J. & Larsson, J. P. (2016). How local are spatial density externalities? Neighbourhood effects in agglomeration economies. Regional studies, 50(6), 1082-1095
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How local are spatial density externalities? Neighbourhood effects in agglomeration economies
2016 (English)In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1082-1095Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The geographic scale at which density externalities operate is analysed in this paper. Using geocoded high-resolution data, the analysis is focused on exogenously determined within-city squares (‘neighbourhoods’) of 1 km2. The analysis confirms a city-wide employment density–wage elasticity and an economically significant density–wage elasticity at the neighbourhood level that attenuate sharply with distance. Panel estimates over 20 years suggest a neighbourhood density–wage elasticity of about 3%, while the city-wide elasticity is about 1%. It is argued that the neighbourhood level is more prone to capture learning, e.g. through knowledge and information spillovers. This interpretation is supported by (1) significantly larger neighbourhood elasticities for university educated workers and (2) sharper attenuation with distance of the effect for such workers.

Keywords
Agglomeration externalities; Density; External scale economies; Geocoded data; Modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP); Productivity; Spatial dependence; Spatial scale; Sweden; Wages
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23658 (URN)10.1080/00343404.2014.968119 (DOI)000374629700012 ()2-s2.0-84908439746 (Scopus ID)
Note

Theme Issue: Environmental Governance of Urban and Regional Development.

Included in doctoral thesis as a manuscript: "How local are Spatial Density Externalities? – Evidence from Square Grid Data".

Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7432-7442

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