Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Sternäng, O., Palmer, K., Kabir, Z. N., Hasan, M. I. & Wahlin, Å. (2018). Associations between functional biological age and cognition among older adults in rural Bangladesh: Comparisons with chronological age. Journal of Aging and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between functional biological age and cognition among older adults in rural Bangladesh: Comparisons with chronological age
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We constructed a functional biological age (fBioAge) indicator by using four functional variables: grip strength, forced expiratory lung volume, visual acuity, and hearing. Our aim was to compare how chronological age (ChronAge) and fBioAge are related to cognitive abilities in older adults.

Method: We used data from the Poverty and Health in Aging project, Bangladesh. Participants (N = 400) were 60+ years of age and diagnosed as nondemented. Examined cognitive abilities were four episodic memory measures (including recall and recognition), two verbal fluency indicators, two semantic knowledge, and two processing speed tasks.

Results: fBioAge accounted for cognitive variance beyond that explained by ChronAge also after controlling for medical diagnoses and blood markers.

Discussion: Compared with ChronAge, fBioAge was a stronger predictor of cognition during a broad part of the old adult span. fBioAge seems, in that respect, to have the potential to become a useful age indicator in future aging studies. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
age indicator, cognitive abilities, cross-sectional
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38917 (URN)10.1177/0898264318757147 (DOI)XYZ ()2-s2.0-85042099239 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-02-27
Broström, A., Wahlin, Å., Alehagen, U., Ulander, M. & Johansson, P. (2018). Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 33(5), 422-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
aged, mortality, rural population, sex differences, sleep, sleep wake disorders, sleep deprivation, self-reported sleep
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43232 (URN)10.1097/JCN.0000000000000393 (DOI)000457865500009 ()28060086 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85008311659 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Wahlin, Å., Alehagen, U., Ulander, M. & Johansson, P. (2018). Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences (1), 290-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. Design: Cross-sectional.

Methods: A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (≥9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.

Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.

Conclusion: Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Aged, Daytime sleepiness, Depression, Insomnia, Rural population, Sex differences, Sleep, Sleep-wake disorders
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36647 (URN)10.1111/scs.12461 (DOI)000426524200029 ()28574585 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020105192 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Sternäng, O. & Wahlin, Å. (2017). Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal trajectories of functional biological age: Comparisons across gender. Behavior Genetics, 47(4), 375-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal trajectories of functional biological age: Comparisons across gender
2017 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 375-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We used an alternate age variable, functional biological age (fBioAge), which was based on performance on functional body measures. The aim was to examine development of fBioAge across the adult life span, and to also examine potential gender differences and genetic and environmental influences on change with age. We used longitudinal data (n = 740; chronological age (ChronAge) range 45-85 at baseline) from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The rate of increase in fBioAge was twice as fast after ChronAge 75 than before. fBioAge was higher in women than in men. fBioAge was fairly equally influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Whereas the rate of ChronAge cannot vary across time, gender, or individual, our analyses demonstrate that fBioAge does capture these within and between individual differences in aging, providing advantages for fBioAge in the study of aging effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Chronological age; Functional bioage; Twins
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36047 (URN)10.1007/s10519-017-9851-5 (DOI)000403569500001 ()28551760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019684303 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2019-02-06Bibliographically approved
Sundgren, M., Piehl, F., Wahlin, Å. & Brismar, T. (2016). Cognitive function did not improve after initiation of natalizumab treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. A prospective one-year dual control group study. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 10, 36-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive function did not improve after initiation of natalizumab treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. A prospective one-year dual control group study
2016 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, ISSN 2211-0348, E-ISSN 2211-0356, Vol. 10, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and has severe implications. Natalizumab (NZ) has documented effects on relapse rate and radiological disease activity in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) but studies regarding its specific effects on cognitive functioning are few. Previous studies have reported improvement, however, often lacking relevant control groups. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive effects of NZ treatment, compared to patients on stable first-line treatment and healthy control subjects.

Methods: MS patients starting NZ (MS-NZ), MS controls with stable interferon beta therapy (MS-C) and healthy control subjects (HC) were evaluated twice with one year interval, using a cognitive test battery covering six cognitive domains. The effects of NZ on levels of self-reported depression, fatigue, daytime sleepiness and perceived health were also examined.

Results: MS patients (MS-NZ and MS-C) had significantly lower baseline cognitive performance compared to HC (global score, p=0.002), but there were no significant differences between MS-NZ and MS-C. At follow-up, both MS-NZ and MS-C had improved significantly in four and five cognitive domains, respectively, and in global score (p=0.013 and p<0.001, respectively). HC improved significantly in three cognitive domains but not in global score. A regression analysis including baseline cognitive z-score and z-score change showed that participants with lower baseline scores had a significantly greater improvement, compared to those with better initial performance (p=0.021). There were no significant changes in depression, fatigue, daytime sleepiness or perceived health in MS-NZ or MS-C.

Conclusions: Initiation of NZ therapy did not result in true cognitive improvement over one year. Presumably, the increased test performance in both MS groups was artificial and due to retest effects that were stronger in patients with lower baseline performance. Adequate control groups are essential when evaluating cognitive functioning in intervention trials among RRMS patients.

National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31737 (URN)10.1016/j.msard.2016.08.011 (DOI)000390826300008 ()27919496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84984682091 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Robins Wahlin, T.-B., Wahlin, Å. & Byrne, G. J. (2015). Episodic Learning and Memory in Prodromal Huntington’s Disease: The Role of Multimodal Encoding and Selective Reminding. International Journal of Clinical Medicine, 6(11), 876-886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Episodic Learning and Memory in Prodromal Huntington’s Disease: The Role of Multimodal Encoding and Selective Reminding
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 876-886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated episodic memory in prodromal HD. Three groups were compared (N=70): mutation carriers with less than 12.5 years to disease onset (n=16), mutation carriers with 12.5 or more years to disease onset (n=16), and noncarriers (n=38). Episodic memory was assessed using the Fuld Object Memory Evaluation, which includes multimodal presentation and selective reminding, and the Claeson-Dahl Learning Test which includes verbal repeated presentation and recall trials. Both carrier groups demonstrated deficient episodic memory compared to noncarriers. The results suggest deficient episodic memory in prodromal HD, and that inconsistent retrieval contributes to these deficits. Multimodal presentation attenuates the deficits.

Keywords
Prodromal Huntington’s disease, Fuld Object Memory Evaluation, Episodic Memory, Short-Term Memory, Neurodegenerative Diseases
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28646 (URN)10.4236/ijcm.2015.611115 (DOI)HHJÅldrandeIS (Local ID)HHJÅldrandeIS (Archive number)HHJÅldrandeIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Sundgren, M., Wahlin, Å., Maurex, L. & Brismar, T. (2015). Event related potential and response time give evidence for a physiological reserve in cognitive functioning in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 356(1-2), 107-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Event related potential and response time give evidence for a physiological reserve in cognitive functioning in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
2015 (English)In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 356, no 1-2, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Different factors may moderate the degree of cognitive deficit. The aim of the present study was to distinguish different mechanisms for cognitive reserve in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS). The effects of clinical variables (physical disability, depression), premorbid intelligence (years of education, vocabulary knowledge), visual event-related potentialmeasures (P300) and response time(RT)were studied in RRMS patients (n=71) and healthy subjects (n=89). Patients with high P300 amplitude and short RT had better cognitive performance. This effect was significantly weaker in controls. High P300 and short RT may be physiological markers of a cognitive reserve in RRMS. In contrast, the association between cognitive scores and premorbid intelligence was similar in patients and in control subjects. The effects of physiological reserve and clinical variables were studied in a hierarchical linear regression model of cognitive performance in RRMS. P300 amplitude and RT explained a considerable amount of variance in global cognitive performance (34%, p b 0.001). The effects of P300 and RTwere notmoderated by premorbid intelligence. Physical disability and depression added significantly to explained variance, and the final model accounted for 44%  (p b 0.001) of the variation. We conclude that physiological reserve is the strongest moderator of cognitive impairment in RRMS

Keywords
Multiple sclerosis, cognitive impairment, cognitive reserve, P300, Response time
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28651 (URN)10.1016/j.jns.2015.06.025 (DOI)000360950800019 ()26117361 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939251289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Sternäng, O., Finkel, D. & Wahlin, Å. (2015). Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal changes in functional biological age. Paper presented at 45th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, JUN 20, 2015, San Diego, CA. Behavior Genetics, 45(6), 688-688
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal changes in functional biological age
2015 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 688-688Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28548 (URN)000364978800166 ()
Conference
45th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, JUN 20, 2015, San Diego, CA
Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2015-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Sternäng, O. & Wahlin, Å. (2015). Longitudinal trends in functional biological age: Impact of lifestyle factors. The Gerontologist, 55, 61-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal trends in functional biological age: Impact of lifestyle factors
2015 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 61-61Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-30473 (URN)000374222700244 ()
Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Robins Wahlin, T.-B., Luszcz, M. A., Wahlin, Å. & Byrne, G. J. (2015). Non-verbal and verbal fluency in prodromal Huntington’s disease. Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, 5(3), 517-529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-verbal and verbal fluency in prodromal Huntington’s disease
2015 (English)In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 517-529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study examines nonverbal (design) and verbal (phonemic and semantic) fluency in prodromal Huntington’s disease (HD). An accumulating body of research indicates subtle deficits in cognitive functioning among prodromal mutation carriers for HD. Methods: Performance was compared between 32 mutation carriers and 38 noncarriers in order to examine the magnitude of impairment across fluency tasks. The Predicted Years To Onset (PYTO) in mutation carriers was calculated by a regression equation and used to divide the group according to whether onset was predicted less than 12.75 years (HD+CLOSE; n=16) or greater than 12.75 years (HD+DISTANT; n=16). Results: The results indicate that both nonverbal and verbal fluency are sensitive to subtle impairment in prodromal HD. HD+CLOSE group produced fewer items in all assessed fluency tasks compared to noncarriers. HD+DISTANT produced fewer drawings than noncarriers in the nonverbal task. PYTO correlated significantly with all measures of nonverbal and verbal fluency. Conclusion: The pattern of results indicates that subtle cognitive deficits exist in prodromal HD, and that less structured tasks with high executive demands are the most sensitive in detecting divergence from the normal range of functioning. These selective impairments can be attributed to the early involvement of frontostriatal circuitry and frontal lobes.

Keywords
Prodromal, cognition, neuropsychology, nonverbal fluency, phonemic fluency, semantic fluency, executive functioning
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28648 (URN)10.1159/000441942 (DOI)000367324900024 ()26955384 (PubMedID)HHJÅldrandeIS (Local ID)HHJÅldrandeIS (Archive number)HHJÅldrandeIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8212-823X

Search in DiVA

Show all publications