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Publications (10 of 77) Show all publications
Salvato, C., Chirico, F., Melin, L. & Seidl, D. (2019). Coupling family business research with organization studies: Interpretations, issues, and insights. Organization Studies, 40(6), 775-791
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coupling family business research with organization studies: Interpretations, issues, and insights
2019 (English)In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 775-791Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family-controlled firms are the most widespread form of business organization, but they have so far attracted limited attention from organizational scholars. The present work suggests that coupling research on family business organizations with organization studies will substantially benefit both areas of scholarly research. We explore how the five core defining features of family firms—ownership, management and governance, transgenerational intention, generational involvement, and perceived identity—may be illuminated by extant research in organization studies, and how, in turn, organizational studies may be extended by investigating its key themes in the empirical context of family firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Family firm, organization studies, family ownership, family management, family generations, family identity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43391 (URN)10.1177/0170840619841402 (DOI)000469383300001 ()2-s2.0-85064153996 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Caccamo, M., Pittino, D. & Chirico, F. (2019). Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective. In: S. Memili & C. Dibrell (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms: (pp. 821-846). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective
2019 (English)In: The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms / [ed] S. Memili & C. Dibrell, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 821-846Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter aims at establishing a link between family business research and regional science. Drawing from the density dependence model from organizational ecology and embeddedness theory, we develop four testable propositions to inquire about the effect of the emergence of family firms’ agglomerations in the territory on firms’ survival.

We theorize that increased family firm density reduces the likelihood of firm failure and this effect is (a) higher for family firms than for non-family firms, (b) lower in urban than in rural areas, and (c) higher in fine-grained variable environments than in stable environments. Contributions and future research implications are detailed in the concluding section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Density dependence; Embeddedness; Failure; Family business
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42854 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-77676-7_30 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063807063 (Scopus ID)9783319776750 (ISBN)9783319776767 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Baù, M., Pittino, D., Chirico, F., Backman, M. & Klaesson, J. (2019). Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 43(2), 360-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts
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2019 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 360-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study analyzes the nexus among business growth, ownership structure, and local embeddedness—that is, the involvement of economic actors in a geographically bound social structure—in rural and urban contexts. This work combines regional economics with studies on family business and firm growth and uses a coarsened matched sample of privately held Swedish firms. The findings indicate that family firms benefit more than nonfamily firms from local embeddedness and as such they achieve higher levels of growth and that this effect is more pronounced in rural areas. Research implications are shared in the Conclusion section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
business growth, local embeddedness, urban–rural contexts, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39334 (URN)10.1177/1042258718796089 (DOI)000458813400011 ()2-s2.0-85064328951 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Sanchez-Famoso, V., Pittino, D., Chirico, F., Maseda, A. & Iturralde, T. (2019). Social capital and innovation in family firms: The moderating roles of family control and generational involvement. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 35(3), Article ID 101043.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social capital and innovation in family firms: The moderating roles of family control and generational involvement
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 35, no 3, article id 101043Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing on the social capital literature, we examine whether the co-existence of distinct yetinteracting social groups, namely family and non-family members, creates the conditions forincreased family firm innovation. In particular, we theorize that family and non-family socialcapital have a joint positive effect on family firm innovation and this joint effect is stronger thanthe single effects of family and non-family social capital. In addition, we predict that while familycontrol has a positive moderating effect, generational involvement has a negative moderatingeffect on the above-mentioned relationship. With supportive empirical results, our research makesimportant contributions to the existing literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Family firm, social capital, family control, generational involvement, innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43110 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2019.02.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064151233 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019 embargo 24;IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019 embargo 24;IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019 embargo 24;IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Chirico, F., Gómez-Mejia, L. R., Hellerstedt, K., Withers, M. & Nordqvist, M. (2019). To merge, sell or liquidate? Socioemotional wealth, family control, and the choice of business exit. Journal of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To merge, sell or liquidate? Socioemotional wealth, family control, and the choice of business exit
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We take the perspective that considering the affective motives of dominant owners is essential to understanding business exit. Drawing on a refinement of behavioral agency theory, we argue that family-controlled firms are less likely than non-family-controlled firms to exit and tend to endure increased financial distress to avoid losses to the family’s socioemotional wealth (SEW) embodied in the firm. Yet, when confronted with different exit options and performance heuristics suggest that exit is unavoidable family firms are more likely to exit via merger, which we argue saves some SEW, although it is less satisfactory financially. In contrast, non-family firms are more likely to exit via sale or dissolution, options that are more prone to offer higher financial returns than mergers. Family and non-family firms thus show different orders of exit options. We find support for these arguments in a longitudinal matched sample of privately held Swedish firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Family business; business exit; financial distress; behavioral agency model; socioemotional wealth
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42191 (URN)10.1177/0149206318818723 (DOI)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-01-30
Lorenzo Gómez, J. D., Núñez-Cacho Utrilla, P., Akhter, N. & Chirico, F. (2018). Boundaries in innovation and path dependence in family business. In: : . Paper presented at 28th ACEDE Conference, June 24th-26th, Valladolid, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundaries in innovation and path dependence in family business
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41038 (URN)
Conference
28th ACEDE Conference, June 24th-26th, Valladolid, Spain
Available from: 2018-07-23 Created: 2018-07-23 Last updated: 2018-07-23Bibliographically approved
Chirico, F., Salvato, C., Byrne, B., Akhter, N. & Arriaga Múzquiz, J. (2018). Commitment escalation to a failing family business. Journal of small business management (Print), 56(3), 494-512
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commitment escalation to a failing family business
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2018 (English)In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 494-512Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overarching intent of this manuscript is to heighten awareness to the concept of commitment escalation as it bears on a failing family business. Specifically, drawing on the concept of emotional ownership, together with self-justification arguments, we a) identify factors considered to be most forceful in contributing to the presence of commitment escalation and thus, resistance to change in a failing family business (i.e., emotional ownership, feeling of responsibility, investment of capital, temporal distance from the founder’s business, individualism/collectivism), and b) model these related factors in a form that can serve heuristically to stimulate future empirical research capable of testing for the construct validity of commitment escalation in a family business context. We present potential items that may be useful for future scholars in measuring our constructs of interest as they relate to a failing family business.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
family business, commitment entrapment, resistance to change
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28154 (URN)10.1111/jsbm.12316 (DOI)000434973400007 ()2-s2.0-85013766056 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2018-07-05
Pittino, D., Martínez, A. B., Chirico, F. & Galván, R. S. (2018). Psychological ownership, knowledge sharing and entrepreneurial orientation in family firms: The moderating role of governance heterogeneity. Journal of Business Research, 84, 312-326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological ownership, knowledge sharing and entrepreneurial orientation in family firms: The moderating role of governance heterogeneity
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 84, p. 312-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adopting a stewardship perspective and relying on a sample of 93 Spanish family firms, we emphasize the importance of psychological ownership as a primary determinant of entrepreneurial orientation in terms of proactiveness, innovativeness and risk taking. We also suggest that the relationship between psychological ownership and entrepreneurial orientation is mediated by knowledge sharing. Finally, we assess the potential moderating roles of heterogenous governance conditions in terms of the generation in control, generational involvement and family involvement in the top management team with regard to the relationship between psychological ownership and knowledge sharing. Research and managerial implications are shared in the concluding section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
family firms’ heterogeneity, entrepreneurial orientation, psychological ownership, knowledge sharing, stewardship
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37382 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.08.014 (DOI)000427811100028 ()2-s2.0-85028696247 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Iyer, D. N., Baù, M., Chirico, F., Patel, P. C. & Brush, T. H. (2018). The triggers of local and distant search: Relative magnitude and persistence in explaining acquisition relatedness. Long range planning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The triggers of local and distant search: Relative magnitude and persistence in explaining acquisition relatedness
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2018 (English)In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Research on problemistic search has assumed negative attainment discrepancy to be the trigger of both local and distant search. Extending this research, we present and compare two additional triggers: (1) relative attainment discrepancy, which reflects how much a firm's attainment discrepancy deviates from its past negative attainment discrepancies; and (2) persistent attainment discrepancy, which reflects how often the firm experiences below-aspirations performance. Our triggers for distant search model a behavioral explanation for the timing and relatedness of acquisitions. We find support for baseline arguments of problemistic search whereby firms increase both industry- and skill-related acquisitions when they perform below aspirations. When they persistently perform below aspirations, however, this likelihood is reduced and firms engage in acquisitions that are more unrelated, thereby providing support for the notion of expanding search boundaries from local to distant search. Of the two triggers of distant search proposed, relative attainment discrepancy does not induce firms to expand search boundaries. Our results indicate that persistent attainment discrepancy is a key construct to consider when studying the expansion of search boundaries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Behavioral theory of the firm, Local and distant search, Performance feedback, Related and unrelated acquisitions, Enterprise resource planning, Finance, Behavioral theory of the firms, Search models, Mergers and acquisitions
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39335 (URN)10.1016/j.lrp.2018.03.001 (DOI)XYZ ()2-s2.0-85045191906 (Scopus ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-05-02
Chirico, F., Criaco, G., Baù, M., Naldi, L., Gomez-Mejia, L. R. & Kotlar, J. (2018). To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms
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2018 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Intellectual property protection, patent, innovation, environmental munificence, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41546 (URN)10.1177/1042258718806251 (DOI)IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-01-04
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3742-542X

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