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Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Chirico, F., Welsh, D. H. B., Ireland, R. D. & Sieger, P. (2020). Family versus non-family firm franchisors: Behavioral and performance differences. Journal of Management Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family versus non-family firm franchisors: Behavioral and performance differences
2020 (English)In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Drawing from resource-based theory, we argue that family firm franchisors behave and perform differently compared to non-family firm franchisors. Our theorizing suggests that compared to a non-family firm franchisor, a family firm franchisor cultivates stronger relationships with franchisees and provides them with more training. Yet, we predict that a family firm franchisor achieves lower performance than a non-family firm franchisor. We argue, however, that this performance relationship reverses itself when family firm franchisors are older and larger. We test our hypotheses with a longitudinal dataset including a matched-pair sample of private U.S. family and non-family firm franchisors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
family firm, franchising, corporate entrepreneurship, performance, relationships, training
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47733 (URN)10.1111/joms.12567 (DOI)2-s2.0-85081557742 (Scopus ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number);IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-05 Created: 2020-02-05 Last updated: 2020-03-31
Akhter, N., Chirico, F., Sieger, P. & Fitz-Koch, S. (2020). Portfolio entrepreneurship in family firms: A review and agenda for future research. In: : . Paper presented at IFERA 2020 Annual Conference, 24-26 June, 2020, Santander, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Portfolio entrepreneurship in family firms: A review and agenda for future research
2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48173 (URN)
Conference
IFERA 2020 Annual Conference, 24-26 June, 2020, Santander, Spain
Available from: 2020-04-21 Created: 2020-04-21 Last updated: 2020-04-21Bibliographically approved
Akhter, N., Edwards, M. G., Ijaz, R. & Chirico, F. (2020). Rich at heart and empty pockets: Bricoleuring entrepreneurial resourcefulness in extreme contexts. In: : . Paper presented at 2020 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Knoxville, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rich at heart and empty pockets: Bricoleuring entrepreneurial resourcefulness in extreme contexts
2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48172 (URN)
Conference
2020 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Knoxville, USA
Note

Conference cancelled due to COVID-19. 

Available from: 2020-04-21 Created: 2020-04-21 Last updated: 2020-04-21Bibliographically approved
Pittino, D., Chirico, F., Baù, M., Villasana, M., Naranjo-Priego, E. E. & Barron, E. (2020). Starting a family business as a career option: The role of the family household in Mexico. The Journal of Family Business Strategy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Starting a family business as a career option: The role of the family household in Mexico
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2020 (English)In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study analyses the determinants of an individual’s intention to start up a new venture thatinvolves family members. Building on the family embeddedness perspective, we hypothesize theexistence of an inverted U-shaped relationship between the number of individuals in a familyhousehold and the intention to start a family business. Moreover, we argue that this relationship ismoderated by the household income and the individual’s education level. With supportiveempirical results based on data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) from Mexico,our work contributes to research on family embeddedness and entrepreneurial career intentionsby identifying the importance of household-level factors in the family business start-up decision,and by depicting such decision as a distinctive career option in terms of self-employment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Start up intentions, Family involvement, Family embeddedness, Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, Mexico
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47426 (URN)10.1016/j.jfbs.2020.100338 (DOI)2-s2.0-85081962885 (Scopus ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number);IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-04-24
Chirico, F., Criaco, G., Baù, M., Naldi, L., Gomez-Mejia, L. R. & Kotlar, J. (2020). To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 44(2), 339-367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To patent or not to patent: That is the question. Intellectual property protection in family firms
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2020 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 339-367Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines family firms’ propensity to protect their intellectual property through patents. Building on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model, we theorize that family ownership has a U-shaped relationship with firm propensity to patent. Specifically, we argue that family firms’ desire to prevent losses of current socioemotional wealth inhibits their propensity to patent until a threshold level of family ownership, beyond which the family’s socioemotional wealth is secured and a greater focus on prospective financial gains attainable through patents is possible. We also suggest that environmental munificence moderates this nonlinear relationship such that a low-munificent environment accentuates the potentially detrimental (beneficial) effects of low-to-medium (medium-to-high) levels of family ownership on patents. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 4,198 small- and medium-sized family firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Intellectual property protection, patent, innovation, environmental munificence, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41546 (URN)10.1177/1042258718806251 (DOI)000514931400008 ()2-s2.0-85064178693 (Scopus ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number);IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
Chirico, F., Baù, M. & Schulze, W. S. (2019). Are Family Firms Loss Averse?. In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Academy of Management. Paper presented at 79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, August 9-13, 2019, Boston, Massachusetts, United States..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Family Firms Loss Averse?
2019 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Academy of Management, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A substantial stream of research has examined how strategic decision making in family-controlled firms is driven by a concern for safeguarding its socioemotional wealth (SEW), or the “affect related value embedded in the family firm” (Gomez-Mejia et al, 2007: 108). Proponents of this theory argue that because family owners and strongly identify with their firm (Cannella, Jones & Withers, 2015; Deephouse & Jaskiewicz, 2013), they routinely prioritize non-economic goals. In this study, we propose an alternative framing based on social identity. Using a panel study of private Swedish firms, we develop theory and find support for our claim that the concern for social identity gives family firms incentives to pursue penetration strategies and make related acquisitions in their core markets, and to offset the risks of that strategy by making diversifying unrelated) in peripheral markets. A reversal of this strategy when financial implications are averse supports the conclusion that family firms are not loss averse. Implications for BAM-based models of SEW are addressed.

Keywords
strategic decision making; family business; socioemotional wealth; acquisitions
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47230 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2019.16375abstract (DOI)
Conference
79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, August 9-13, 2019, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
Available from: 2020-01-06 Created: 2020-01-06 Last updated: 2020-01-06
Salvato, C., Chirico, F., Melin, L. & Seidl, D. (2019). Coupling family business research with organization studies: Interpretations, issues, and insights. Organization Studies, 40(6), 775-791
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coupling family business research with organization studies: Interpretations, issues, and insights
2019 (English)In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 775-791Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family-controlled firms are the most widespread form of business organization, but they have so far attracted limited attention from organizational scholars. The present work suggests that coupling research on family business organizations with organization studies will substantially benefit both areas of scholarly research. We explore how the five core defining features of family firms—ownership, management and governance, transgenerational intention, generational involvement, and perceived identity—may be illuminated by extant research in organization studies, and how, in turn, organizational studies may be extended by investigating its key themes in the empirical context of family firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Family firm, organization studies, family ownership, family management, family generations, family identity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43391 (URN)10.1177/0170840619841402 (DOI)000469383300001 ()2-s2.0-85064153996 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019;IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Pittino, D., Chirico, F., Henssen, B. & Broekaert, W. (2019). Does increased generational involvement foster business growth? The moderating roles of family involvement in ownership and management. European Management Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does increased generational involvement foster business growth? The moderating roles of family involvement in ownership and management
2019 (English)In: European Management Review, ISSN 1740-4754, E-ISSN 1740-4762Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Building upon the upper echelon perspective, we examine the effect of generationalinvolvement in management on various measures of business growth and consider differentlevels of family participation. Specifically, we argue that generational involvement and theparticipation of family actors in ownership and management foster cognitive diversity at theTMT level, which may ultimately positively or negatively impact family business growth. Ourtheory, which is tested using a longitudinal sample of unlisted Belgian family firms, contributesprimarily to the literature related to the determinants of family firm growth, which, to date, haspaid limited attention to the combined effect of different family involvement factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
family firms; generational involvement; growth; ownership; top management team
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45688 (URN)10.1111/emre.12366 (DOI)000492384800001 ()2-s2.0-85074593707 (Scopus ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number);IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Caccamo, M., Pittino, D. & Chirico, F. (2019). Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective. In: S. Memili & C. Dibrell (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms: (pp. 821-846). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family firm density and likelihood of failure: An ecological perspective
2019 (English)In: The Palgrave handbook of heterogeneity among family firms / [ed] S. Memili & C. Dibrell, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 821-846Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter aims at establishing a link between family business research and regional science. Drawing from the density dependence model from organizational ecology and embeddedness theory, we develop four testable propositions to inquire about the effect of the emergence of family firms’ agglomerations in the territory on firms’ survival.

We theorize that increased family firm density reduces the likelihood of firm failure and this effect is (a) higher for family firms than for non-family firms, (b) lower in urban than in rural areas, and (c) higher in fine-grained variable environments than in stable environments. Contributions and future research implications are detailed in the concluding section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Density dependence; Embeddedness; Failure; Family business
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42854 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-77676-7_30 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063807063 (Scopus ID)9783319776750 (ISBN)9783319776767 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Baù, M., Chirico, F., Pittino, D., Backman, M. & Klaesson, J. (2019). Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 43(2), 360-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts
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2019 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 360-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study analyzes the nexus among business growth, ownership structure, and local embeddedness—that is, the involvement of economic actors in a geographically bound social structure—in rural and urban contexts. This work combines regional economics with studies on family business and firm growth and uses a coarsened matched sample of privately held Swedish firms. The findings indicate that family firms benefit more than nonfamily firms from local embeddedness and as such they achieve higher levels of growth and that this effect is more pronounced in rural areas. Research implications are shared in the Conclusion section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
business growth, local embeddedness, urban–rural contexts, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39334 (URN)10.1177/1042258718796089 (DOI)000458813400011 ()2-s2.0-85064328951 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3742-542X

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