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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Engström, A., Barry, D., Sollander, K., Edh Mirzaei, N. & Johansson, A. (2019). Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs. In: Academy of Management Proceedings: . Paper presented at 79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM) 2019, August 9-13, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Academy of Management, Article ID 14906.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs
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2019 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2019, article id 14906Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organizational Ambidexterity (OA)–the ability to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation–is increasingly being advocated as a way to gain competitive advantage. Most of the work on OA has focused on large, multi-divisional organizations, resulting in frameworks and prescriptions that have little utility for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With this in mind, we report on the first year of an exploratory, quasi-experimental study of ambidexterity within six small-to-medium manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. The research is characterized by an emic, ‘invented here’ approach, where companies closely examine their current exploration and exploitation practices, use their findings to formulate more advanced OA approaches uniquely suited to their values and circumstances, and iteratively apply and refine these over a four year period. It appears that the construct of ‘unplanned’ and associated sub-constructs such as ‘disturbance, crashes, and interruption’ could be an important key to framing and improving OA within these SMEs and perhaps more generally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2019
Series
Academy of Management Proceedings, ISSN 0065-0668, E-ISSN 2151-6561 ; 1
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45623 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2019.14906abstract (DOI)
Conference
79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM) 2019, August 9-13, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Ots, M., Lopez-Vega, H. & Johansson, A. (2019). Stretching the knowledge boundaries of the firm: How local newspapers reinvent organizational practices in a digital world. In: : . Paper presented at European Media Management Association Conference, "Media Management and Actionable Knowledge: The Relationship between Theory and Practice", Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus, June 5-9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stretching the knowledge boundaries of the firm: How local newspapers reinvent organizational practices in a digital world
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43700 (URN)
Conference
European Media Management Association Conference, "Media Management and Actionable Knowledge: The Relationship between Theory and Practice", Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus, June 5-9
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
McKelvie, A., Chandler, G. N., DeTienne, D. R. & Johansson, A. (2019). The measurement of effectuation: highlighting research tensions and opportunities for the future. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The measurement of effectuation: highlighting research tensions and opportunities for the future
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we address issues related to the measurement of effectuation. We identify and examine 81 empirical studies focusing on research tensions (fundamental assumptions, theoretical underpinnings, boundary conditions, units of analyses, measures, and temporal issues) within the effectuation literature. Our findings suggest these tensions inhibit the accumulation of empirical knowledge. We highlight the challenges involved in effectively measuring effectuation and offer solutions and recommendations for systematic knowledge accumulation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Causation, Effectuation, Measurement, Specification, Theory
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47135 (URN)10.1007/s11187-019-00149-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062014640 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2019-12-17
Engström, A. & Johansson, A. (2017). Working meetings and inspiration for learning. In: : . Paper presented at 11th Organizational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities conference (OLKC), Valladolid, April 26 - 28, 2017.. OLKC. Organizatioal Learning, Knowledge & Capabilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working meetings and inspiration for learning
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OLKC. Organizatioal Learning, Knowledge & Capabilities, 2017
National Category
Business Administration Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36518 (URN)
Conference
11th Organizational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities conference (OLKC), Valladolid, April 26 - 28, 2017.
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Engström, A. & McKelvie, A. (2016). An In-depth Investigation of Employee-driven Innovation. In: 36th Babson College Entrepreneurship Conference, Bodø, June 8-11, 2016.: . Paper presented at 36th Babson College Entrepreneurship Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An In-depth Investigation of Employee-driven Innovation
2016 (English)In: 36th Babson College Entrepreneurship Conference, Bodø, June 8-11, 2016., 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Principal topic

 This paper is direct the focus on the potential of employees to contribute to innovation, regardless their position in the company – a practice and research stream we know as employee driven innovation (EDI) (Kristiansen & Bloch‐Poulsen, 2010). More specifically, we study the effects of using an online platform to motivate and track employee driven activities. We use a unique dataset of close to 500 employee driven activities responding to the overall strategic goals of a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden.

It goes without saying that expertise, experience, ideas, creativity and skills among employees are valuable resources in the company’s innovation work (Høyrup, 2010) and support achievement of competitive advantages (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010). EDI include acting on your own ideas and not only respond to needs of the organization (Lovén, 2013), furthermore EDI includes both bottom‐up and top‐down perspectives on innovation (Høyrup, Bonnafous‐Boucher, Hasse, Lotz, & Møller, 2012). The presence of EDI is dependent on mechanisms that influence the organisation’s innovation capabilities (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010). Dominant mechanisms include fundamental determinants of work engagement known from motivational research, such as the need for autonomy, competence and relatedness (Hakanen & Roodt, 2010; Mauno, Kinnunen, & Ruokolainen, 2007) but also feedback and the possibility of seeing one’s own part in the bigger picture (Hackman & Oldham, 1980).

Amundsen et al. (2014) who suggest that important factors for stimulating EDI include leader support through the generation, registration, evaluation and realisation of ideas; a collaborative climate including interactions between colleagues and between employees and external contacts; rendering autonomy and delegation of decision‐making authority to employees. Research has also highlighted several restraining forces for EDI, such as the gap between management and employees and the fact that managers are not capable of seeing the things that employees meet in their daily work (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010).

Despite the vast knowledge relating to motivational theory, social comparison and social facilitation surprisingly few studies examine how this knowledge could be combined and successfully be put to practice to promote EDI. The focus on the majority of work has been on investigating restraining and enabling factors of EDI (Aaltonen & Hytti, 2014; Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010), exploring how EDI occurs in teams (Kristiansen & Bloch‐Poulsen, 2010) and small organizations (Aaltonen & Hytti, 2014). As a result of this, we know a lot about what need to be accomplished to promote EDI, but we do not know what tools work or not to reach those accomplishments. In particular, we know little about how this could take place in large organizations where people are spread geographically.

By drawing upon knowledge from social cognitive theory (Bandura, 2001) showing that strong perceived collective efficacy increase people’s aspirations and motivations, we analyze the outcomes from a year-long strategic work at a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden. This takes shape in a database consisting of detailed information on close to 500 employee-driven activities in a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden. Social cognitive theory extends the conception of human agency to collective agency (Bandura 1997) where people’s shared belief in their collective power is a key ingredient

Method

We use a unique data set of close to 500 employee-driven activities entered in a cloud-based, online database. The database was used as a means to active the employees at the 370 retail units in an organizational change project launched earlier the same year. The project started off with 32 physical dialogue meetings between the CEO and the retail unit staff where the overall strategic goals were presented and discussed. Ambassadors in management positions were appointed at each retail unit, responsible to encourage, initiate and document the activities rendered by the employees. The online database allowed for constant transparency between the retail units – giving the possibility to share ones ideas and experiences, mistakes and successes throughout the whole year while the project was running. The database consist of secondary data, as we did not intervene in the creation or execution of the project. Same thing goes for the written evaluation made after the project was completed – where employees were asked about their impressions and experiences from using the database. 

The retailing business is highly competitive and the geographical spread of employees makes it a suitable context to explore the use of online tools of this kind for promoting EDI in other large businesses or smaller businesses geographically spread.  

We used mainly qualitative analysis methods to explore the database as well as simple quantitative analysis to produce frequencies and descriptive data. By coding each activity according to the degree of innovativeness and type of activity (e.g. internal process, customer service) we could form a good understanding of the outcomes from using the database.

Results and implications

Our study of the database and the subsequent employee evaluation form reveals interesting and uplifting results. For example, 64 % said the online tool helped them better understand the overall strategy and 85 % were happy with the user interface and continuous work with the tool. Also, half of the retail outlets claimed the tool helped them run projects which increased sales considerably. Among the more successful activities were one initiating earlier opening hours (which previously was attempted to be pushed up-down without success) – this activity alone corresponded to the average turnover of 22 outlets. 

The result are in line with social comparison and social facilitation theory, showing how public praise and social comparison seem to improve employee driven innovation motivation (Mumm and Mutlu (2001). Although comparative studies are hard to find (we did not) similar findings were made in the use of mobile exercise applications. A recent study by Hamari and Koivisto, 2015) shows that social influence, positive recognition and reciprocity have a positive impact on how much people are willing to exercise.  In fact, the more “friends” a user the larger the effects were, which could explain the success of the online tool in this study – which involved the exposure among more than 300 outlets.  Our findings, similar to Hamari and Koivisto (2015), further our understanding on the phenomenon of social influence showing, how public recognition and network effects contribute to the collective employee-driven innovation.

Keywords
Innovation, Employee-driven Innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-30840 (URN)
Conference
36th Babson College Entrepreneurship Conference
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A. & Engström, A. (2016). Effectual learning in SME’s – activities promoting transformation in place of frustration. In: Per Davidsson (Ed.), Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2016: Conference proceedings. Paper presented at Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference (ACERE) 2016, 2–5 February 2016, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Queensland University of Technology, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectual learning in SME’s – activities promoting transformation in place of frustration
2016 (English)In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2016: Conference proceedings / [ed] Per Davidsson, Queensland University of Technology, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research , 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper takes its starting point in an empirical problem, to which we believe current research have difficulties offering operational solutions. The root of the problem lies in the tensions between the common held expectations of small firms (SMEs) to contribute to society’s growth and innovation – and the different factors which makes such accomplishment challenging, including lack of time and the need to master different skills. Upon adding uncertainty with regards to goal definition; information scarcity or overflow and the pressure to manage an ever-changing market, this triggers frustration at instances where innovative action is needed the most.

The paper builds upon the idea that human interaction result in learning that either transforms or reproduces the processes involved. This relates back to the ideas of an organization’s need to explore new as well as exploit existing products and processes. The challenge for SMEs to deal with these both types of learning – and ultimately release innovative capacity – is at the core of this paper. We find that nature of the problem; degree of complexity and level of competence in the problem area are all important determinants for the chosen activities which also relates to the fit with the effectual learning processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Queensland University of Technology, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, 2016
Keywords
Corporate entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial Cognition, Small Business Management, (Organisational Learning, Effectuation Theory)
National Category
Business Administration Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-30824 (URN)978-0-646-95752-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference (ACERE) 2016, 2–5 February 2016, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved
Engström, A. & Johansson, A. (2016). Effectual learning in SME’s to promote transformation instead of frustration: Towards a design of an intervention study. In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016.: . Paper presented at The 4th Effectuation Conference. The Society for Effectual Action
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectual learning in SME’s to promote transformation instead of frustration: Towards a design of an intervention study
2016 (English)In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016., The Society for Effectual Action , 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Society for Effectual Action, 2016
Keywords
Corporate entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial Cognition, Small Business Management, Organisational Learning, Effectuation Theory
National Category
Business Administration Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-30829 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Effectuation Conference
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., McKelvie, A. & Ellonen, H.-K. (2016). Explaining the co-existence of effectuation and causation: An indepth qualitative study of decision makers. In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016.: . Paper presented at The 4th Effectuation Conference. The Society for Effectual Action
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explaining the co-existence of effectuation and causation: An indepth qualitative study of decision makers
2016 (English)In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016., The Society for Effectual Action , 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Society for Effectual Action, 2016
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-30836 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Effectuation Conference
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Rösiö, C., Bruch, J. & Johansson, A. (2015). Early production involvement in new product development. In: POMS 26th Annual Conference POMS: . Paper presented at POMS 26th Annual Conference POMS, Washington DC, 8-11 May, 2015.. Production and Operations Management Society (POMS)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early production involvement in new product development
2015 (English)In: POMS 26th Annual Conference POMS, Production and Operations Management Society (POMS) , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In early phases of production system design important decisions are made that set prerequisites for the whole project. However, production engineers often gets involved when the decisions already are made. This paper aims to develop support for early production involvement founded on multiple case studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Production and Operations Management Society (POMS), 2015
Keywords
Production system development, Decision making heuristics, Manufacturing industry
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29740 (URN)
Conference
POMS 26th Annual Conference POMS, Washington DC, 8-11 May, 2015.
Projects
XPRESEQUIP: User-Supplier integration in production equipment designETTRIG - Electric Towbarless Tractor with Range Extender and InteGrated chargerStrategic Production Development
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Ellonen, H.-K. & Johansson, A. (2015). Magazine management: Publishing as a business. In: David Abrahamson and Marcia R. Prior-Miller (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form. New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magazine management: Publishing as a business
2015 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form / [ed] David Abrahamson and Marcia R. Prior-Miller, New York: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Magazine management as a field of study lies within the area of Media Management and Economics (MME). MME research is producing a growing body of literature focusing on economic, management and business issues in the media industries, based largely on traditional concepts and theories in the two related disciplines of management and economics. Study of media management and economics has grown in stature since the 1990s pioneering works of Robert Picard and Alan Albarran. Several seminal books have been published in the 2000s, including the Handbook of Media Management and Economics and Annet Aris and Jacques Bughin’s Managing Media Companies. The founding of three academic journals, namely the Journal of Media Economics (in 1988), the International Journal of Media Management (in 1999), and the Journal of Media Business Studies (in 2007), has established the field by providing industry-specific publication outlets for research on journalism and media-based business and economics.

This chapter comprises a review of the current research on the magazine industry, segmented in the following five categories: media economics, management research, business modeling, innovation and brand management. These categories reflect the main body of research related to magazines and magazine publishing from a business perspective. Research specific to magazine publishing is scarce in comparison with that in other media sectors, such as the newspaper industry. However, a strength is that the body of magazine-related research includes both global and digital studies, with theory and applications continuing to mature. Included in this review is management research that focuses on magazine publishers, as well as research in which magazine publishing is the empirical context for a larger theoretical approach.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2015
Keywords
magazines, media, business models, innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26153 (URN)978-1-138-85416-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5836-577X

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