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Kuura, A. & Lundin, R. A. (2019). Process perspectives on entrepreneurship and projects. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 12(1), 25-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process perspectives on entrepreneurship and projects
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to integrate research on entrepreneurship and projects by applying process perspectives on these two fields with the ambition to shed light on how this kind of alternative perspectives can be used to further the fields in research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach: This conceptual paper is based on previous research efforts in the two fields and on how they have been treated in the past. Business process research is introduced to enrich notions on how the two areas can be combined.

Findings: By rearranging thinking about projects, entrepreneurship and processes, and through introducing the notion of “chunks”, the authors illustrate how different types of business processes in different types of project contexts can be coordinated through orchestration and/or choreography.

Research limitations/implications: The research made for this conceptual paper has been thorough. However, the literature is huge, so the reservation must be made that the authors might have missed some important trends. Anyway, there are implications for how research and analyses of data can be used with the thinking described.

Originality/value: Combining various lines of research is not common as illustrated by the lack of studies combining entrepreneurship and projects; therefore, by adding process notions and “chunk” reasoning, this paper opens up for innovation and renewal in research. To the authors’ knowledge this approach is new. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Business processes, Choreography, Chunks, Entrepreneurship, Orchestration, Projects
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39342 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-12-2017-0165 (DOI)000470917800003 ()2-s2.0-85045477995 (Scopus ID);IHHMMTCIS (Local ID);IHHMMTCIS (Archive number);IHHMMTCIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Lundin, R. A. (2019). World views on projects and society. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 12(2), 238-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>World views on projects and society
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 238-241Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45324 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-06-2019-285 (DOI)000479290200001 ()2-s2.0-85067357284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A. (2016). Exploring projects and rituals. In: : . Paper presented at 30th ANZAM Conference, "Under new management: Innovating for sustainable and just futures", 6-9 December 2016, School of Management, QUT Business School,Brisbane, Australia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring projects and rituals
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Exploring the role of rituals in projects and temporary organizations is potentially a way to understand and theorize projects and project-as-practice better. The task to do so is not easy since rituals can also be conceived to be related to other phenomena like routines in project work, prescribed or not. Furthermore, rituals play different roles within a temporary organization as compared to the roles they might have in relation to the general context of a project. Boundaries of projects and temporary organizations are more often than not blurred and the notion of rituals helps to remind us about that. One argument for attending to rituals is that they as well as routines can be constructed to promote sustainability.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31710 (URN)
Conference
30th ANZAM Conference, "Under new management: Innovating for sustainable and just futures", 6-9 December 2016, School of Management, QUT Business School,Brisbane, Australia
Note

Abstract no.: ANZAM-2016-452

Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2017-02-08Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A. (2016). Project Society: Paths and challenges. Project Management Journal, 47(4), 7-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Project Society: Paths and challenges
2016 (English)In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Project Society, organizing by projects plays a prominent role. This type of society is already here, but projectification continues to lead developments and transformations along a set of paths and trajectories. One way to describe this trend is to say that there is societal organizing in which various types of projects are becoming even more prevalent and diverse. The projectification trend seems to be the result of a variety of mechanisms at work, where a wide set of traditional institutions-ranging from laws to mindsets-is constantly challenged and reformed. Managing, along with the nature of work, are changing and adapting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
projectification; paths; archetypes; challenges
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31707 (URN)000404017000002 ()2-s2.0-85047301335 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A. & Norbäck, M. (2016). Projectification in the media industries. In: Gregory Ferrell Lowe, Charles Brown (Ed.), Managing media firms and industries: What's so special about media management? (pp. 367-382). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Projectification in the media industries
2016 (English)In: Managing media firms and industries: What's so special about media management? / [ed] Gregory Ferrell Lowe, Charles Brown, Cham: Springer, 2016, p. 367-382Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since the death of the Hollywood studio system, projects have been the established way of producing content in a large part of the media industries. This includes sectors such as film and TV, advertising, electronic gaming, the recording industry, and book publishing. There seems to be an increasing trend of ‘projectification’ also in other parts of the media industries, for example, news media, which traditionally have not been organised according to a project logic. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the notion of projectification as it relates to the media industries and consider the implications this may have for media management. The chapter starts with an introduction to the general project management literature, describing its origins and development including the more recent discussion of projectification. It then turns to the media setting and discusses how content production is increasingly organised in projects and how this gives rise to what has been described as ‘project networks’ that evolve over time. Here the authors discuss what a project mode of organising means for the people set to manage media production, as well as for the individual media professional. The chapter ends with a discussion of what the trend of projectification in the media industries implies for the management of media—not only for the production of content but also for other, more strategic, endeavours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2016
Series
Media Business and Innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28542 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-08515-9_21 (DOI)978-3-319-08514-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-08515-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2015-12-10 Last updated: 2017-02-07Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Lundin, R. A. & Söderholm, A. (2016). Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations: Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 9(4), 752-766
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations: Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 752-766Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze important parts of the contemporary development of project research and to outline plausible and desirable directions for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is accomplished through a review of the “Scandinavian School of Project Management” and “Rethinking Project Management,” which is complemented with a set of questions distributed to 27 active researchers within the project research field from around the world.

Findings

Through the analysis the authors show how the two streams have more similarities than differences, despite the fact that they have been initiated in very different contexty 8ts and ways. The authors could also conclude that the “Scandinavian School” appears stronger on the international scene than in the Nordic countries, and that general perception of what the “school” stands for has changed and been blurred with time. Based on the analysis the authors also proposed the need for a broad, more coherent research effort in terms of a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations. The essence of this would be: an action research profile to improve practice and foresee the future; a combined research focus on institutional change and project practice to ensure both theoretical and empirical progress; and a strong global perspective to further enrich both theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This research has obvious limitations in terms of empirical scope and response selection. The questionnaire results should therefore be interpreted with care.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in its reflective nature and the proposed trajectory of the project research domain.

Keywords
Project management, Development, Projects, Temporary organizations, Future directions, Scandinavian School of Project Management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31708 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-10-2015-0100 (DOI)000386076000004 ()2-s2.0-84985028705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Raviola, E., Lundin, R. A. & Norbäck, M. (2015). Forever temporary: Organizing innovation in two newspapers. In: : . Paper presented at emma conference 2015, "Development and Sustainability in Media Business", The Business School of the University of Hamburg, Germany, May 28, 2015 – May 29, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forever temporary: Organizing innovation in two newspapers
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Traditional newspapers all over the world are struggling – in many cases for survival. Several newspapers have already disappeared and there are predictions that all print newspapers will be gone within a few decades. The newspaper death process started long ago in most Western countries, but in many parts of the world the change still has to become evident. The reason for these deaths is mainly that traditional newspaper companies have difficulties in coping with a new media world and the digital transformation. As demonstrated by The Economist in a cover titled “Who killed the newspaper?” already in 2006, the phenomenon is not new. Company owners exit from the newspaper markets and/or try ventures in new areas.

Some newspaper companies have deliberately sought to adapt to the swiftly changing markets in various ways, leading to significant transformations. The institutional patterns embedded in the industry as a whole as well as internally within the companies have developed over a long time of relative stability. The ongoing transformation has put an end to stability. The implication is that traditional newspapers have to meet with new organizational forms adapted to dwindling markets and/or to emerging forms emanating from the digital ecosystem.

Strategies of renewal and change for many newspaper organizations have implied launching change projects in which solutions are put in place as a response to technological and societal developments. Our empirical observations  show how different projects are launched – often in terms of change programs where strategy connections between different actions are stressed – in order to keep the companies in business and to restore profitability. De-learning seems to be needed to handle traditions and finding new avenues for profitability involves re-learning. In this paper we focus on how change projects in practice are combined into strategizing efforts. We rely on theories of projects and temporary organizations and literature on organizing and new media.

Empirically this paper is based on interviews with key persons working for newspapers in Europe with intentions to survive the current downturn. The newspapers – or the newspaper businesses – face similar problems and the purpose is to describe and analyse the patterns of survival efforts. Since the newspaper industry appears highly isomorphic, the patterns might be similar for newspapers around the world. However, that matter is a concern for extended studies of the processes involved on a world-wide basis where the prevailing institutions might imply different trajectories.

Our observations show that the survival efforts often take the form of change projects, sometimes packaged together in change programs. This illustrates a trend of projectification of activities observed in the contemporary society in other contexts.  It also seems to be sets of projects that no longer have a limited time-span, nor a defined task, and often not even any sign of transition in terms of coming closer to any kind of termination (described as four core elements of projects). Instead, we argue using empirical examples from how the newspaper industry organize development projects, that (some) projects of today have become “garbage cans” for all kinds of development ideas where people, new technologies, professions, and vested interests are mixed in complex processes with often surprising outcomes.

Our empirical examples illustrate how projects become never-ending, and become “permanently temporary” since the outcome of the project will change depending on who is evaluating the project, according to what measures, and in relation to the purpose of the project and the program – which in turn will change during the course of time. Politics and vested interests in combination with the notoriously unpredictable future of digital, new media (“if it doesn’t make money today, it might still be useful for some other purpose in the future, but since we don’t know we cannot afford to scrap it yet”) make it almost impossible to terminate a newspaper development project based on any measurement of success.

To conclude, we propose that the contemporary measurement of project success is not of a project (or program) that is finished, but rather – like a marriage – a project that never ends but which develops over time. The rationale for starting a renewal effort sometimes is related to a “must” and sometimes to how new opportunities come up. This means that the goal (or task) for renewal efforts does not remain unfettered by time and experiences over time but should be thought of as dreams for the future – a tentative conception of an end state.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31713 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
emma conference 2015, "Development and Sustainability in Media Business", The Business School of the University of Hamburg, Germany, May 28, 2015 – May 29, 2015
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2016-09-09Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A. & Tryggestad, K. (2015). Guest editorial. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 8(1), 5-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guest editorial
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 5-8Article in journal, Editorial material (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28540 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-10-2014-0074 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2015-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A., Arvidsson, N., Brady, T., Ekstedt, E., Midler, C. & Sydow, J. (2015). Managing and working in project society: Institutional challenges of temporary organizations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing and working in project society: Institutional challenges of temporary organizations
Show others...
2015 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this book, leading authorities on project organizing explore the growing deployment of projects and other types of temporary organizations, with a focus on the challenges created by projectification. The way projects are coordinated and handled influences the success of innovation and change within organizations and is critical for strategic development in our societies, yet it is often at odds with the institutions of traditional industrial society. Drawing on both theoretical perspectives and real-world cases, this book sheds light on the transformation toward a project society and explores the effects, opportunities, and conflicts it has created. As change continues, the authors make a case for renewing institutions and mind-sets and provide a foundation from which to discuss societal changes for the future. This is an invaluable book for researchers and students in project management and organizational theory programs, as well as professionals involved in the management of projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. p. 274
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28524 (URN)9781107077652 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved
Lundin, R. A. (2015). Project Society – Paths and challenges. In: : . Paper presented at APROS/EGOS Conference, "Spaces, Constraints, Creativities: Organization and Disorganization", Sydney, Australia, December 9–11, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Project Society – Paths and challenges
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31719 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
APROS/EGOS Conference, "Spaces, Constraints, Creativities: Organization and Disorganization", Sydney, Australia, December 9–11, 2015
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2016-09-09
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2629-6968

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