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Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Hammarsten, M., Askerlund, P., Almers, E., Avery, H. & Samuelsson, T. (2019). Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 19(3), 227-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 227-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, cities become more dense, green spaces disappear and children spend less time outdoors. Research suggests that these conditions create health problems and lack of ecological literacy. To reverse such trends, localities are creating urban green spaces for children to visit during school time. Drawing on ideas in ecological literacy, this study investigates school children’s perspectives on a forest garden, a type of outdoor educational setting previously only scarcely researched. Data were collected through walk-and-talk conversations and informal interviews with 28 children aged 7 to 9. Many children in the study expressed strong positive feelings about the forest garden, the organized and spontaneous activities there, and caring for the organisms living there. We observed three aspects of learning in the data, potentially beneficial for the development of children’s ecological literacy: practical competence, learning how to co-exist and care, and biological knowledge and ecological understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
forest garden; social Studies of childhood; children’s perspectives; walk-and-talk conversations; ecological literacy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41474 (URN)10.1080/14729679.2018.1517371 (DOI)000470670800004 ()2-s2.0-85053503238 (Scopus ID)HOA HLK 2019 (Local ID)HOA HLK 2019 (Archive number)HOA HLK 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Hammarsten, M., Askerlund, P., Almers, E., Avery, H. & Samuelsson, T. (2018). Barns perspektiv på att vistas i en skogsträdgård. In: : . Paper presented at Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, 25–26 oktober 2018, Örebro universitet.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barns perspektiv på att vistas i en skogsträdgård
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2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
skogsträdgård, lågstadieelever, samtalspromenader
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42291 (URN)
Conference
Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, 25–26 oktober 2018, Örebro universitet
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Hammarsten, M., Askerlund, P., Almers, E., Avery, H. & Samuelsson, T. (2018). Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: children’s perspectives
Show others...
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Keywords
forest garden; social Studies of childhood; children’s perspectives; walk-and-talk conversations; ecological literacy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42364 (URN)
Note

Summary of the article: Hammarsten, M., Askerlund, P., Almers, E., Avery, H., Samuelsson, T., (2018). Developing ecological literacy in a forest garden: Children's Perspectives. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14729679.2018.1517371 on the Children & Nature Network Research Digest website.

Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Askerlund, P. & Almers, E. (2018). Hur fungerar ekosystemtjänster som verktyg för hållbarhetsarbete på förskolor?. In: : . Paper presented at Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, 25–26 oktober 2018, Örebro universitet.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur fungerar ekosystemtjänster som verktyg för hållbarhetsarbete på förskolor?
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
ekosystemtjänster, förskola, hållbar utveckling, lärande, skogsträdgård
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42290 (URN)
Conference
Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, 25–26 oktober 2018, Örebro universitet
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Golino, H., Hamer, R., Almers, E. & Kjellström, S. (2018). Measuring epistemological development – a uni- or multidimensional structure?. In: : . Paper presented at European Society for Research on Adult Development (ESRAD), ​25th to 27th May 2018, University of Greenwich, London, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring epistemological development – a uni- or multidimensional structure?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40477 (URN)
Conference
European Society for Research on Adult Development (ESRAD), ​25th to 27th May 2018, University of Greenwich, London, UK
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Hammarsten, M., Almers, E., Askerlund, P., Avery, H. & Samuelsson, T. (2018). The Forest Garden from Children's Perspectives. In: : . Paper presented at Childhood and Materiality. VIII conference on childhood studies, 7-9 may Jyväskylä Finland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Forest Garden from Children's Perspectives
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogy Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39400 (URN)
Conference
Childhood and Materiality. VIII conference on childhood studies, 7-9 may Jyväskylä Finland
Projects
Forest gardens as environments for learning, recreation and sustainability
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Almers, E., Askerlund, P. & Kjellström, S. (2018). Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences. The Journal of Environmental Education, 49(3), 242-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences
2018 (English)In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Forest garden; outdoor environmental education; school garden; sustainability; systemic thinking
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37430 (URN)10.1080/00958964.2017.1373619 (DOI)000431603400004 ()2-s2.0-85030151207 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Kjellström, S., Sjölander, P., Almers, E. & McCall, M. E. (2017). Value systems among adolescents: Novel method for assessing level of ego-development. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 58(2), 150-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value systems among adolescents: Novel method for assessing level of ego-development
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children's value systems develop through youth and influence attitudes and actions. But there is a lack of appropriate measures for children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to construct and validate a questionnaire that reveals distinct value systems among adolescents, and to evaluate the identified value systems’ relationship to degree of ego-development and moral development. A quantitative study in a Swedish School with ages 12 through 16 (grades 6 to 9) was performed (N = 204). A set of pattern recognition statistical analyses has been used to identify different profiles of values systems and demonstrate that these systems can be arranged in a hierarchical order similar to other development. Results revealed three value systems in this sample. The identified value systems reflect different degrees of moral and ego-development among children in the study. Three distinct value systems were identified: the first (n = 9) and the second value systems (n = 35) correspond to pre-conventional stages, and the third value system (n = 155) corresponds to early conventional stages of ego development. Ego development scoring of test statements to assess stages. The value system was significantly related to moral development in the personal interest and the maintaining norms schemas of the Defining Issues Test (DIT). However, many students did not complete the entire DIT, so those results should be looked at with caution. It appears that this new test (Test for Adolescent Value Systems – TAVS) does relate to an established ego development rating scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Adolescent, values, developmental psychology, value system
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34220 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12356 (DOI)000396917100006 ()28252192 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014328814 (Scopus ID)HHJIMPROVEIS, HLKSkolnäraIS (Local ID)HHJIMPROVEIS, HLKSkolnäraIS (Archive number)HHJIMPROVEIS, HLKSkolnäraIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
Ramirez-Pasillas, M., Almers, E., Wagman, P. & Stagell, U. (2016). Education for sustainability: Transformative processes, actions and systemic change in a Swedish university. In: : . Paper presented at EURAM 2016, "Manageable Cooperation", June 1-2-3 and 4, 2016, Paris, France. European Academy of Management (EURAM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education for sustainability: Transformative processes, actions and systemic change in a Swedish university
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research on the development of education for sustainability places attention to transformative processes and systemic changes at the university. Literature mainly studies processes to develop courses, programs and management systems but seldom investigates transformative processes and actions triggering organizational change. The objective of this paper is to identify key actions and transformative processes embodying an education for sustainability and to explore the systemic change outcomes, using the perspective of social learning. We relied on a participatory research method for the exploratory case study in a Swedish university. Our findings showed multiple key actions that resulted in five transformational processes. Together these transformative processes resulted in three systemic changes: organizational changes in sustainability perceptions, organizational changes in the working structures and educational curricula, and individual changes in perceptions and engagement on sustainability. A novel finding was that networking cross disciplinary facilitated double loop refection and worked as catalyst for other transformational processes. The result indicates that development of education for sustainability is facilitated by a combination of multiple transformative processes taking place with both top-down and bottom-up rationale. These processes generate individual and collective actions. Individual and network champions and top-managers play a key role in developing education for sustainability. In order to foster systemic change at the university, the existence of this complexity is crucial for developing education for sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Academy of Management (EURAM), 2016
Keywords
Higher education, sustainability, change
National Category
Business Administration Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35543 (URN)
Conference
EURAM 2016, "Manageable Cooperation", June 1-2-3 and 4, 2016, Paris, France
Note

Published in e-proceedings (ISSN: 2466-7498)

Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Askerlund, P. & Almers, E. (2016). Forest gardens – new opportunities for urban children to understand and develop relationships with other organisms. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 20, 187-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forest gardens – new opportunities for urban children to understand and develop relationships with other organisms
2016 (English)In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 20, p. 187-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This case study explores a learning situation in a forest garden in Sweden. A forest garden is an edible polyculture landscape with different layers of mostly perennial vegetation. The forest garden is designed to maximize the yield of useful plants while minimizing the input of energy and resources, including human labour. Forest gardens may offer learning situations that contextualize interconnectedness and relations between organisms as well as situations that are beneficial for evaluative development (Kellert, 2002), i.e. the development of values, beliefs and moral perspectives in children.

Twenty-seven seven to eight year old primary school children were followed in the first six months of a three year project in which they participated in developing a forest garden. The aim of the study is to investigate how the children reason with respect to different organisms’ dependence on and relations to each other, themselves included. Specifically:

  • How do the children describe their own relationships with other organisms, as well as the relationships between other organisms in the forest garden?
  • What values of nature are expressed by the children, and in relation to which situations in the forest garden?

Data were collected in the form of field notes, audio and video recordings and photos from the children’s visits to the forest garden. The photos were used for stimulated recall in focus group interviews. The data were analysed using a combination of qualitative content analysis (Patton, 2002) and semi-quantitative methods.

The children in the study presented a unidirectional perspective about the relationship between themselves and the organisms, especially the insects, in the forest garden. Rather than asking what these organisms can do for me/us, they pose the question: What can I/we do for the bugs/plants/ bees?  

The humanistic values, expressed by the children as a willingness to help other organisms (mostly insects) are in line with the explicit aims of the former curriculum for Biology to “promote care and respect for nature”. We should note that these humanistic values are no longer explicitly stated in the current curriculum. It is striking that the anthropocentric ecosystem services perspective (introduced in the current curriculum from grade 4), is so rare in the data. The children seldom mentioned the benefits for humans from insect pollination, even though this relationship is clearly stated by the pedagogues together with humanistic values.

 In observations, the children showed a great deal of curiosity for the natural environment (naturalistic value) as well as joy and enthusiasm about participating in the different activities that took place in the forest garden. Aesthetic values were expressed in relation to flowers, cones, berries, a snail’s shell etc.

This study shows that forest gardens have the potential to be places where children can connect emotionally and cognitively to other organisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31546 (URN)10.1016/j.ufug.2016.08.007 (DOI)000391471000021 ()2-s2.0-84988027272 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2017-03-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3199-6755

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