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Kjellström, S., Törnblom, O. & Stålne, K. (2020). A dialogue map of leader and leadership development methods: A communication tool. Cogent Business and Management, 7(1), Article ID 1717051.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A dialogue map of leader and leadership development methods: A communication tool
2020 (English)In: Cogent Business and Management, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 1717051Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dialogue map is a new pedagogical framework that provides an overview of leader and leadership development methods and is designed to facilitate dialogues about how to promote leadership development. The aim was to create and test a dialogue map. This was accomplished through an iterative process using the literature, experts on leadership development, 45 interviews, 16 questionnaire responses and 6 workshops in three large organizations with managers, professionals and human resources experts. The dialogue map is designed as a table with five categories: developmental relationships, developmental assignments, feedback-intensive processes, education and self-development activities. Each category consists of individual leader development methods and collective leadership development methods. Thirty three methods are presented. The pilot test showed that the dialogue map increased awareness about available methods and enabled more deliberate choices regarding development activities. The dialogue map contributes by providing a systematic overview of collective leadership development, not only individual leadership development. Leadership development becomes more democratized because it focuses on activities that can be done in daily work, inside and outside work, at both an individual and collective level. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogent OA, 2020
Keywords
collective leadership, leader development, leadership development, management, training and development
National Category
Work Sciences Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47953 (URN)10.1080/23311975.2020.1717051 (DOI)2-s2.0-85079702644 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2020 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2020 (OAI)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20160158
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Bradbury, H., Glenzer, K., Apgar, M., Embury, D. C., Friedman, V., Kjellström, S., . . . Devecha, S. (2020). Action Research Journal’s seven quality choicepoints for action oriented research for transformations. Action Research, 18(1), 3-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action Research Journal’s seven quality choicepoints for action oriented research for transformations
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2020 (English)In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-6Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47999 (URN)10.1177/1476750320904562 (DOI)000523898900001 ()2-s2.0-85082438979 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-20 Created: 2020-03-20 Last updated: 2020-05-26Bibliographically approved
Bradbury, H. & Kjellström, S. (2019). Awakening to human centered interaction. Dialogue with Sofia Kjellström [blog post].
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Awakening to human centered interaction. Dialogue with Sofia Kjellström [blog post]
2019 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45853 (URN)
Note

Published 2019 on the blog AR+.

Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, K., Kjellström, S. & Sandman, L. (2019). Dual loyalties: Everyday ethical problems of registered nurses and physicians in combat zones. Nursing Ethics, 26(2), 480-495
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual loyalties: Everyday ethical problems of registered nurses and physicians in combat zones
2019 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 480-495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

When healthcare personnel take part in military operations in combat zones, they experience ethical problems related to dual loyalties, that is, when they find themselves torn between expectations of doing caring and military tasks, respectively.

Aim:

This article aims to describe how Swedish healthcare personnel reason concerning everyday ethical problems related to dual loyalties between care and military tasks when undertaking healthcare in combat zones.

Design:

Abductive qualitative design.Participants and research context:Individual interviews with 15 registered nurses and physicians assigned for a military operation in Mali.

Ethical considerations:

The participants signed up voluntarily, and requirements for informed consent and confidentiality were met. The research was approved by the Regional Ethics Review Board in Gothenburg (D no. 816-14; 24 November 2014).

Findings:

Three main categories emerged: reasons for not undertaking combat duties, reasons for undertaking combat duties and restricted loyalty to military duties, and 14 subcategories. Reasons for not undertaking combat duties were that it was not in their role, not according to ethical codes or humanitarian law or a breach towards patients. Reasons for undertaking combat duties were that humanitarian law does not apply or has to be treated pragmatically or that it is a case of force protection. Shortage of resources and competence were reasons for both doing and not doing military tasks. Under some circumstances, they could imagine undertaking military tasks: when under threat, if unseen or if not needed for healthcare duties.

Discussion/conclusion:

These discrepant views suggest a lack of a common view on what is ethically acceptable or not, and therefore we suggest further normative discussion on how these everyday ethical problems should be interpreted in the light of humanitarian law and ethical codes of healthcare personnel and following this, further training in ethical reflection before going on military operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Codes of ethics; dual loyalties; empirical approaches; ethical problems; ethics education; ethics of care/care ethics; military ethics; military nursing; nursing ethics; professional ethics; qualitative research; theory/philosophical perspectives; topic areas
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37236 (URN)10.1177/0969733017718394 (DOI)000461439900015 ()28766395 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062835004 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Kjellström, S. (2019). Ethics and sexual health: Exploration of the ethical code of conduct for physiotherapists concerning sexual health in clinical practice. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 35(11), 1015-1026
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethics and sexual health: Exploration of the ethical code of conduct for physiotherapists concerning sexual health in clinical practice
2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 1015-1026Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physiotherapists have an important role in sexual health, but there are specific ethical considerations regarding sexuality and the practice of physiotherapy which require serious consideration. This article aims to illustrate how the professional ethical code of physiotherapy can serve as a tool for ethical clinical reasoning regarding sexual health in clinical physiotherapy practice. We analyse the ethical codes for physical therapy, in relation to a definition of sexual health and the declaration of sexual rights. The analysis outlines several ethical considerations crucial in dealing with sexual health, while also acknowledging the critical role of cultural context in any ethical analysis. We conclude that physiotherapists need to practise ethical reasoning and that the ethical code of physiotherapy can act as a point of departure for reflection on thought-provoking ethical dilemmas to improve the practice of physiotherapy and support clients’ overall health. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Physical therapy, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, sexual well-being, sexuality, article, clinical practice, ethics, human, physiotherapist, physiotherapy practice, sexual health, thinking, wellbeing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40402 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2018.1470209 (DOI)29723127 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046416984 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2019-09-25
Kjellström, S., Areskoug Josefsson, K., Andersson-Gäre, B., Andersson, A.-C., Ockander, M., Käll, J., . . . Robert, G. (2019). Exploring, measuring and enhancing the coproduction of health and well-being at the national, regional and local levels through comparative case studies in Sweden and England: the 'Samskapa' research programme protocol. BMJ Open, 9(7), Article ID e029723.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring, measuring and enhancing the coproduction of health and well-being at the national, regional and local levels through comparative case studies in Sweden and England: the 'Samskapa' research programme protocol
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e029723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Cocreation, coproduction and codesign are advocated as effective ways of involving citizens in the design, management, provision and evaluation of health and social care services. Although numerous case studies describe the nature and level of coproduction in individual projects, there remain three significant gaps in the evidence base: (1) measures of coproduction processes and their outcomes, (2) mechanisms that enable inclusivity and reciprocity and (3) management systems and styles. By focusing on these issues, we aim to explore, enhance and measure the value of coproduction for improving the health and well-being of citizens.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS:

Nine ongoing coproduction projects form the core of an interactive research programme ('Samskapa') during a 6-year period (2019-2024). Six of these will take place in Sweden and three will be undertaken in England to enable knowledge exchange and cross-cultural comparison. The programme has a longitudinal case study design using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Cross-case analysis and a sensemaking process will generate relevant lessons both for those participating in the projects and researchers. Based on the findings, we will develop explanatory models and other outputs to increase the sustained value (and values) of future coproduction initiatives in these sectors.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION:

All necessary ethical approvals will be obtained from the regional Ethical Board in Sweden and from relevant authorities in England. All data and personal data will be handled in accordance with General Data Protection Regulations. Given the interactive nature of the research programme, knowledge dissemination to participants and stakeholders in the nine projects will be ongoing throughout the 6 years. External workshops-facilitated in collaboration with participating case studies and citizens-both during and at the end of the programme will provide an additional dissemination mechanism and involve health and social care practitioners, policymakers and third-sector organisations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
case study, codesign, coproduction, healthcare, social care, adult, article, cultural factor, England, human, organization, physician, quantitative analysis, scientist, Sweden, wellbeing
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46421 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029723 (DOI)000485269700101 ()31350253 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070675953 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-01431
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Robert, G., Kjellström, S., Areskoug Josefsson, K., Andersson-Gäre, B., Andersson, A.-C., Ockander, M., . . . Donetto, S. (2019). Exploring, measuring and enhancing the co-production of health and wellbeing at the national, regional and local levels through comparative case studies in Sweden and England: The 'Samskapa' research programme (study protocol). In: : . Paper presented at 14th ESA Conference, Europe and Beyond: Boundaries, Barriers and Belonging, 20-23 August 2019, Manchester, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring, measuring and enhancing the co-production of health and wellbeing at the national, regional and local levels through comparative case studies in Sweden and England: The 'Samskapa' research programme (study protocol)
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45081 (URN)
Conference
14th ESA Conference, Europe and Beyond: Boundaries, Barriers and Belonging, 20-23 August 2019, Manchester, UK
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Kjellström, S. & Mitchell, A. (2019). Health and healthcare as the context for participatory action research. Action Research, 17(4), 419-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health and healthcare as the context for participatory action research
2019 (English)In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 419-428Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Participatory action research (PAR) is a social, practical and collaborative process in which the building of relationships with participants is crucial. It has two distinct features, one is community based and driven to generate knowledge or understanding about what will bring about change; the other is its quality improvement cycle, whereby the actions, reactions, interventions and change are monitored, reviewed and adjusted according to the response. In practical terms, PAR methodology is carried out as a series of planning, acting, observing and evaluating cycles; in other words, reflection and reflexivity are inherent in the process. The challenges of engaging with PAR are to ensure that participants are encouraged to collaborate fully with the process and drive the process, power imbalances are discussed and the recognition that change and action may not always be possible. There are also challenges when studies are written up in a reflexive manner because being reflexive is not as straightforward as it seems. It involves deep introspection, as the researchers become aware of how their own agenda, experiences and motivation can contribute to interactions with participants and potentially influence the knowledge and actions created.

This specially themed issue draws nine papers together to enrich our understanding of PAR and action-oriented research for transformations (Bradbury et al., 2019b). The aspiration in this presentation is to consider future directions in the domain of healthcare. In relation to the Action Research Journal’s vision, researchers should aim to develop Sustainable Development Goals when engaging in credible quality improvement projects that are monitored and adaptable in the relevant setting (Bradbury et al., 2019a). Our emphasis is therefore to concentrate more on reflexivity, transformation and the implications when developing future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47133 (URN)10.1177/1476750319891468 (DOI)000502283900001 ()2-s2.0-85077179225 (Scopus ID)
Note

Theme Issue: Health and healthcare as the context for participatory action research. Guest Editors: Sofia Kjellström and Ann Mitchell.

Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Avby, G. & Kjellström, S. (2019). LearnOvation: an intervention to foster exploration and exploitation behaviour in health care management in daily practice. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1), Article ID 319.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LearnOvation: an intervention to foster exploration and exploitation behaviour in health care management in daily practice
2019 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Innovation has been identified as an important engine for improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of health care. Little is known about how to stimulate innovation capacity in primary health care in general; even less is known about how specific interventions should be designed to support managements' work with practice-based innovations. Research has shown that if managers and teams are excellent at handling the challenges of production (exploitation) and development (exploration), they are better at innovation. The aim of the study is to develop a dynamic management support programme to increase innovation leadership skills in daily practice.

METHODS: The study has an interactive approach that allows the need for empirical and theoretical knowledge to emerge and merge, and a quasi-experimental cross-over design. Eight primary health care centres will participate in the study. In the first phase, the management teams at four health care centres will participate in the intervention, and the other four centres will serve as a control group. Thereafter, the units will switch places and the control group will experience the intervention. All staff at the 8 units will answer questionnaires at four points in time (before, during, after, 6 months later) to evaluate the effects of the intervention.

DISCUSSION: The study will contribute to knowledge on how to organize processes of innovation and support exploitation and exploration behaviours by co-producing and testing a tailor-made management support programme for innovation work in primary health care. An expected long-term effect is that the support system will be disseminated to other centres both within and beyond the participating organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Experimental cross-over design, Exploitation, Exploration, Health care research
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43775 (URN)10.1186/s12913-019-4152-8 (DOI)000468786300007 ()31113453 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066506650 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Kjellström, S. & Golino, H. (2019). Mining concepts of health responsibility using text mining and exploratory graph analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 26(6), 395-410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining concepts of health responsibility using text mining and exploratory graph analysis
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 395-410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Occupational therapists need to know about people’s beliefs about personal responsibility for health to help them pursue everyday activities.

Aim: The study aims to employ state-of-the-art quantitative approaches to understand people’s views of health and responsibility at different ages.

Methods: A mixed method approach was adopted, using text mining to extract information from 233 interviews with participants aged 5 to 96 years, and then exploratory graph analysis to estimate the number of latent variables. The fit of the structure estimated via the exploratory graph analysis was verified using confirmatory factor analysis.

Results: Exploratory graph analysis estimated three dimensions of health responsibility: (1) creating good health habits and feeling good; (2) thinking about one’s own health and wanting to improve it; and 3) adopting explicitly normative attitudes to take care of one’s health. The comparison between the three dimensions among age groups showed, in general, that children and adolescents, as well as the old elderly (>73 years old) expressed ideas about personal responsibility for health less than young adults, adults and young elderly.

Conclusions: Occupational therapists’ knowledge of the concepts of health responsibility is of value when working with a patient’s health, but an identified challenge is how to engage children and older persons. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
exploratory graph analysis, health, occupational therapy, Responsibility for health, text mining, adolescent, adult, aged, article, child, confirmatory factor analysis, controlled study, exploratory research, female, groups by age, habit, human, interview, major clinical study, male, mining, occupational therapist, quantitative analysis, responsibility, thinking, young adult
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39756 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2018.1455896 (DOI)000466582700001 ()29792082 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047374766 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJIMPROVEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8952-8773

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