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Backman, M. & Karlsson, C. (2020). Age of managers and employees – Firm survival. Journal of the Economics of Ageing, 15, Article ID 100215.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age of managers and employees – Firm survival
2020 (English)In: Journal of the Economics of Ageing, ISSN 2212-828X, Vol. 15, article id 100215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many developed countries will face a disproportionately large share of older individuals in the future. This change may lead to a labour force characterized by older employees and older operational managers. This paper contributes to the existing literature on the effect of aging on firm performance by performing an explorative analysis of how the age of the operational manager and the age composition of employees relate to the survival of Swedish firms during 2004–2013. We observe that the relationship between the age of the operational manager and firm exit changes functional shape when separated into different firm-size categories. Additionally, the age of the operational manager tends to be more important for new firms compared to incumbents. The share of older employees is positively associated with firm survival. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Age, Employees, Firm age, Firm size, Firm survival, Operational manager
National Category
Economics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46863 (URN)10.1016/j.jeoa.2019.100215 (DOI)000516721400001 ()2-s2.0-85074492714 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
Amato, S., Basco, R., Backman, M. & Lattanzi, N. (2020). Family-managed firms and local export spillovers: evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms. European Planning Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family-managed firms and local export spillovers: evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms
2020 (English)In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

By combining arguments from regional economics and family business research, the aim of this article is to test the relationships among local export spillovers, management characteristics, and export propensity on a large sample of Spanish manufacturing firms over the 2003–2015 period. We find that family-managed firms, compared to their non-family counterparts, benefit more from being located in regions with a high density of exporters. Because of their firm-specific social capital and strong embeddedness in local networks, family-managed firms are better positioned to leverage the spatially bounded flow of knowledge and information in these regions, resulting in a higher likelihood to export than non-family firms. Additionally, our results show that the knowledge spillover effect is stronger for small and low-tech family firms’ export propensity. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Export spillovers, family firms, internationalization, manufacturing, regional context, Spain
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48321 (URN)10.1080/09654313.2020.1743238 (DOI)000523710000001 ()2-s2.0-85082613988 (Scopus ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Local ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Archive number);IHHCEnSEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-05-11 Created: 2020-05-11 Last updated: 2020-05-26
Backman, M. & Kohlhase, J. E. (2020). Labor force diversity and firm survival. Journal of regional science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labor force diversity and firm survival
2020 (English)In: Journal of regional science, ISSN 0022-4146, E-ISSN 1467-9787Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We analyze the influence that the diversity of individuals, both within a firm and in the region where the firm is located, has on firm survival. We estimate a hazard model using microdata for Swedish firms for the years 2002?2013. Results show that firm-specific diversity in education, age, and gender are positively associated with firm survival. However, firm-specific diversity by place of origin is negatively associated with firm survival. Yet the cultural diversity among the inhabitants in the region where the firm is located enhances firm survival. Magnitudes of the effects vary by region and industrial sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
cultural diversity, demographic diversity, educational diversity, employee diversity, firm survival, hazard model, labor force diversity, occupational diversity
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48454 (URN)10.1111/jors.12488 (DOI)HOA JIBS 2020;IHHCEnSEIS (Local ID)HOA JIBS 2020;IHHCEnSEIS (Archive number)HOA JIBS 2020;IHHCEnSEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-05-19 Created: 2020-05-19 Last updated: 2020-05-19
Backman, M., Brenner, T., Hirte, G. & Wanzenböck, I. (2020). New editors-in-chief and 40th anniversary of RRR. Jahrbuch für Regional Wissenschaft, 40, 1-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New editors-in-chief and 40th anniversary of RRR
2020 (English)In: Jahrbuch für Regional Wissenschaft, ISSN 0173-7600, E-ISSN 1613-9836, Vol. 40, p. 1-2Article in journal, Editorial material (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48083 (URN)10.1007/s10037-020-00138-3 (DOI)000520788600001 ()2-s2.0-85081983649 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-07 Created: 2020-04-07 Last updated: 2020-04-24Bibliographically approved
Backman, M., Lopez, E. & Rowe, F. (2020). The occupational trajectories and outcomes of forced migrants in Sweden. Entrepreneurship, employment or persistent inactivity?. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The occupational trajectories and outcomes of forced migrants in Sweden. Entrepreneurship, employment or persistent inactivity?
2020 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The current surge in forced migration to Europe is probably the largest and most complex since the Second World War. As population aging accelerates and fertility falls below replacement level, immigration may be seen as a key component of human capital to address labor and skill shortages. Receiving countries are, however, hesitant about the contribution that forced migrants can make to the local economy. Coupled with increasing pressure on welfare services, they are associated with increased job competition and crime. Underutilization of immigrants’ skills is, however, a waste of resources that countries can scarcely afford. Understanding the labor market integration process of forced migrants is thus critical to develop policies that unleash their full skills potential and ultimately foster local economic productivity. While prior studies have examined the employment and salary outcomes of these immigrants at a particular point in time post-migration, they have failed to capture the temporal dynamics and complexity of this process. Drawing on administrative data from Sweden, we examine the occupational pathways of forced migrants using sequence analysis from their arrival in 1991 through to 2013. Findings reveal polarized pathways of long-term labor market integration with over one-third of refugees experiencing a successful labor market integration pathway and an equally large share facing a less fruitful employment outcomes. Our findings suggest education provision is key to promote a more successful integration into the local labor market by reducing barriers of cultural proximity and increasing the occurrence of entrepreneurship activity. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Forced migration, Labor market outcomes, Longitudinal occupational trajectories, Sequence analysis, Sweden
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47839 (URN)10.1007/s11187-019-00312-z (DOI)000516164300001 ()2-s2.0-85079183793 (Scopus ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Local ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Archive number);IHHCEnSEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-03-27
Backman, M., Karlsson, C. & Kekezi, O. (Eds.). (2019). Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many developed countries are facing a demographic change with an increasing share of older individuals, yet little is known about how older workers will impact regional and national economies in terms of labor market dynamics. This Handbook deals with the important and emerging field of entrepreneurship among this group and focuses on the behavioral perspectives of this phenomenon; on innovation, dynamics and performance; and the ways entrepreneurship among the elderly looks within different countries.

[From publisher's description]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019. p. 448
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47093 (URN)9781788116206 (ISBN)9781788116213 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-16Bibliographically approved
Backman, M., Karlsson, C. & Kekezi, O. (2019). Introduction to the Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging. In: M. Backman, C. Karlsson & O. Kekezi (Ed.), Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging: (pp. 1-22). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to the Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging
2019 (English)In: Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging / [ed] M. Backman, C. Karlsson & O. Kekezi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, , p. 448p. 1-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019. p. 448
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47095 (URN)10.4337/9781788116213.00005 (DOI)9781788116206 (ISBN)9781788116213 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, P., Backman, M., Bjerke, L. & Maniriho, A. (2019). One cow per poor family: Effects on the growth of consumption and crop production. World Development, 114, 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One cow per poor family: Effects on the growth of consumption and crop production
2019 (English)In: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 114, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study estimates the effects of the one cow policy on per capita consumption and the value of per hectare crop production in Rwanda using a random sample of households observed twice (2010 and 2014). A model that accounts for heterogeneity across households and the selection bias and placement effect associated with the policy is estimated. Findings show that receiving a cow has a positive effect on crop production indicating that the cattle has enabled households to become more productive on the farm. Results point to the importance of household's knowledge and experience of rearing livestock for the outcome of receiving a cow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
CEM, Consumption, Crop production, Girinka, Rwanda, Bos
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41827 (URN)10.1016/j.worlddev.2018.09.024 (DOI)000453497900001 ()2-s2.0-85054236038 (Scopus ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Local ID);IHHCEnSEIS (Archive number);IHHCEnSEIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Baù, M., Chirico, F., Pittino, D., Backman, M. & Klaesson, J. (2019). Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 43(2), 360-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 360-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study analyzes the nexus among business growth, ownership structure, and local embeddedness—that is, the involvement of economic actors in a geographically bound social structure—in rural and urban contexts. This work combines regional economics with studies on family business and firm growth and uses a coarsened matched sample of privately held Swedish firms. The findings indicate that family firms benefit more than nonfamily firms from local embeddedness and as such they achieve higher levels of growth and that this effect is more pronounced in rural areas. Research implications are shared in the Conclusion section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
business growth, local embeddedness, urban–rural contexts, family firms
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39334 (URN)10.1177/1042258718796089 (DOI)000458813400011 ()2-s2.0-85064328951 (Scopus ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Local ID)PP JIBS 2019 (Archive number)PP JIBS 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Backman, M. & Wallin, T. (2018). Access to banks and external capital acquisition: Perceived innovation obstacles. The annals of regional science, 61(1), 161-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Access to banks and external capital acquisition: Perceived innovation obstacles
2018 (English)In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 161-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine whether low access to banks is perceived as problematic when obtaining financial capital for innovation activities. Data on innovation obstacles from the Swedish Community Innovation Survey are combined with geo-coded data at the firm level, which allows us to proxy access to external capital by the Euclidian distance from each firm to its nearest bank and the supply within a radius of five kilometres. The results indicate that both a longer distance to the nearest bank and fewer banks in the vicinity are related to experiencing greater difficulties in obtaining external financial capital for innovations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38234 (URN)10.1007/s00168-018-0863-8 (DOI)000438628600008 ()2-s2.0-85045453031 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6947-3859

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