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Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Olausson, U. (2018). “Stop Blaming the Cows!”: How Livestock Production is Legitimized in Everyday Discourse on Facebook. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, 12(1), 28-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Stop Blaming the Cows!”: How Livestock Production is Legitimized in Everyday Discourse on Facebook
2018 (English)In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2016, Swedish climate reporting declined in quantity and shifted focus somewhat from climate change as such to the harmful climate impacts of meat consumption. The latter prompted discussions in social media – an increasingly important forum for public debate but infrequently studied in environmental communication research. Despite strong evidence that a meat and dairy based diet is devastating for the environment, meat consumption is increasing, and this qualitative study aims to – through the lens of social representation theory – contribute knowledge about how livestock production is legitimized in everyday discourse on Facebook. The article identifies representations that legitimize livestock production through polarization between (1) livestock production and other (environmental) issues, (2) environmentally “good” and “bad” countries, and (3) “reliable” and “unreliable” information. It concludes by discussing the influence of national ideology on the legitimization of livestock production and the potential of social media to counter the post-politicization of environmental issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
social media, environmental communication, social representation theory, climate change, meat, lay sense-making
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38263 (URN)10.1080/17524032.2017.1406385 (DOI)000423594200004 ()2-s2.0-85038012471 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Mörner, C. & Olausson, U. (2017). Hunting the Beast on YouTube: The framing of nature in social media. Nordicom Review, 38(1), 17-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hunting the Beast on YouTube: The framing of nature in social media
2017 (English)In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humans’ perceived relationship to nature and non-human lifeforms is fundamental for sustainable development; different framings of nature – as commodity, as threat, as sacred etc. – imply different responses to future challenges. The body of research on nature repre-sentations in various symbolic contexts is growing, but the ways in which nature is framed by people in the everyday has received scant attention. This paper aims to contribute to our understanding of the framing of nature by studying how wild-boar hunting is depicted on YouTube. The qualitative frame analysis identified three interrelated frames depicting hunting as battle, as consumption, and as privilege, all of which constitute and are constituted by the underlying notion of human as superior to nature. It is suggested that these hegemonic nature frames suppress more constructive ways of framing the human-nature relationship, but also that the identification of such potential counter-hegemonic frames enables their discursive manifestation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2017
Keywords
sustainable development, nature-culture, frame analysis, visual analysis, social media, film analysis, hunting
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34214 (URN)10.1515/nor-2016-0038 (DOI)000405995700002 ()2-s2.0-85020133342 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Nature meets Network Society: Citizens' Social Representations of Nature in Social Media
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-12-07 Created: 2016-12-07 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Olausson, U. (2017). The celebrified journalist: Journalistic self-promotion and branding in celebrity constructions on Twitter. Journalism Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The celebrified journalist: Journalistic self-promotion and branding in celebrity constructions on Twitter
2017 (English)In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Ongoing transformations of the media ecology in the direction of greater digitization have increasingly blurred the boundaries between professional journalists and other information brokers; the former now must work hard to distinguish themselves from the latter. Notable among these developments is a shift towards the individualization of journalism, with journalists seeming to spend more time building personal brands, for instance on Twitter, than on building organizational ones. Within journalism research there is a growing interest in the use of Twitter for journalistic self-promotion and branding, but studies are still scarce, and the ways in which journalistic self-promotion is discursively constituted need further empirical and theoretical attention. By means of a critical discourse analysis of the tweets of a widely followed journalist in Sweden, and through the theoretical lens of celebrity, this study aims to contribute knowledge about how journalistic self-promotion discourses evolving in the digitized media setting are constituted. The article identifies discourses that construct celebrity through (1) “fame by association,” (2) asymmetrical communication, and (3) “lifestreaming.” It concludes by discussing “celebrification” as a vital component of journalistic self-promotion discourses as well as the power aspects of ubiquitous self-promotional discourses, which are deeply embedded in the general structures of society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Social media, journalism, celebrification, CDA, journalistic identity, self-commodification, self-production, selfies
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36924 (URN)10.1080/1461670X.2017.1349548 (DOI)2-s2.0-85026788092 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-18 Created: 2017-08-18 Last updated: 2017-09-08
Olausson, U. (2017). The Reinvented Journalist: The Discursive Construction of Professional Identity on Twitter. Digital Journalism, 5(1), 61-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Reinvented Journalist: The Discursive Construction of Professional Identity on Twitter
2017 (English)In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 61-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, there is much academic discussion about how journalism and journalists are affected by rapid change and convergence in the work context. Considering the fundamental transformations of the media ecology brought about by digitization and the advent of social media, it has been assumed that journalists are more or less compelled to reinvent their professional role and identity. We know a good deal about how social media is adopted by journalists, mostly through survey and interview studies investigating self-perceptions of identity in terms of norms and values. There are also some case studies, predominantly in the form of (quantitative) content analyses, exploring the (innovative) uses of Twitter. However, we still have little knowledge about how the professional identity of journalists is discursively constructed – how, in specific detail, traditional norms and ideals are discursively reinforced or challenged – in the Twitter flow. With a discourse theoretical and methodological approach, this article aims to contribute to our understanding of the discursive construction of professional identity on Twitter by qualitatively analyzing tweets from the most widely followed journalist in Sweden. The analysis of the most active j-tweeter can yield important clues as to what journalism may be in the process of becoming. The article identifies discourses that (1) reinforce the watchdog identity, (2) challenge the watchdog identity, (3) reinforce the disseminator/explicator identity, and (4) reinforce transparency but challenge professional identity. It concludes that the reinvented journalistic identity includes discursive processes that both shape and are shaped by Twitter in a dialectical relationship. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
journalism, journalistic identity, j-tweeters, news, normalizing, professional ideals, social media, Twitter
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29480 (URN)10.1080/21670811.2016.1146082 (DOI)000396578900004 ()2-s2.0-84965028322 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-1498
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P., Olausson, U. & Ots, M. (2017). What is Sustainable Journalism?: An introduction. In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism (pp. 11-26). Peter Lang Publishing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is Sustainable Journalism?: An introduction
2017 (English)In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, Our Common Future, the report from the UN World Commission on Environment and Development (also known as the Brundtland Report), pointed out economic growth, environmental protection and social equality as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be balanced and reconciled. Economic growth is in this sense necessary for a developing world, but a one-sided focus on economy will eventually lead to a world that is both socially and environmentally poorer. Obviously, the issue of sustainability has not been absent from the field of journalism research; on the contrary, there is plenty of research focusing on journalism and environmental sustainability (e.g., climate change, fracking, renewables, etc.), social sustainability (e.g., democratic and political participation, poverty, inequality), and economic sustainability (e.g., ownership, commercialization, business models). However, where journalism studies traditionally treat these three aspects of sustainability disjointedly, this book attempts to pull them closer together and integrally approach sustainable development in its environmental, social and economic sense.

The book departs from the premise that journalism has a role to play in global sustainable development—to inform, investigate and to educate in ways that reconcile the three pillars. It also raises questions about the internal sustainability of journalism itself, asking how its rampant need for economically sustainable business models can possibly be negotiated with its social and environmental obligations and impacts. In this way, the concept of sustainable journalism interlinks two current sustainability challenges that are of great theoretical relevance and in urgent need of empirical research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37308 (URN)10.3726/b11462 (DOI)9781433143816 (ISBN)9781433134418 (ISBN)9781433134401 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2017-09-27Bibliographically approved
Berglez, P., Olausson, U. & Ots, M. (Eds.). (2017). What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism. Peter Lang Publishing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, the Brundtland Report pointed out economic growth, social equality and environmental protection as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be reconciled. However, usually, scholars interested in the business crisis of the media industry tend to leave the social and environmental dimensions of journalism aside, and vice versa. What Is Sustainable Journalism? is the first book that discusses and examines the economic, social and environmental challenges of professional journalism simultaneously. This unique book and fresh contribution to the discussion of the future of journalism assembles international expertise in all three fields, arguing for the necessity of integral research perspectives and for sustainable journalism as the key to long-term survival of professional journalism. The book is relevant for scholars and master’s students in media economy, media and communication, and environmental communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017. p. 374
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37190 (URN)10.3726/b11462 (DOI)9781433143816 (ISBN)9781433134418 (ISBN)9781433134401 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2017-09-19Bibliographically approved
Olausson, U. & Berglez, P. (2016). Media and Climate Change: Four Long-standing Research Challenges Revisited. In: Olausson, Ulrika & Berglez, Peter (Ed.), Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading?: (pp. 111-127). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media and Climate Change: Four Long-standing Research Challenges Revisited
2016 (English)In: Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading? / [ed] Olausson, Ulrika & Berglez, Peter, Routledge, 2016, p. 111-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
climate change, media research, media studies, climate journalism, environmental communication, sustainable journalism
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34231 (URN)113821938X (ISBN)9781138219380 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
Olausson, U. & Berglez, P. (Eds.). (2016). Media research on climate change: Where have we been and where are we heading?. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media research on climate change: Where have we been and where are we heading?
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2016
Keywords
climate change, media, environmental communication, environmental journalism, climate journalism
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34074 (URN)9781138219380 (ISBN)113821938X (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
Olausson, U. & Berglez, P. (2016). Towards a research agenda for sustainable journalism. In: ECREA 2016 abstract book: . Paper presented at The 6th European Communication Conference (ECREA) (pp. 415). Prague: Czech-In
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a research agenda for sustainable journalism
2016 (English)In: ECREA 2016 abstract book, Prague: Czech-In , 2016, p. 415-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prague: Czech-In, 2016
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34075 (URN)978-80-906655-0-7 (ISBN)
Conference
The 6th European Communication Conference (ECREA)
Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved
Olausson, U. & Djerf-Pierre, M. (2015). Miljöjournalistik. In: Karlsson, Michael & Strömbäck, Jesper (Ed.), Handbok i journalistikforskning: (pp. 243-261). Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miljöjournalistik
2015 (Swedish)In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Karlsson, Michael & Strömbäck, Jesper, Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 243-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Studentlitteratur AB, 2015
Keywords
Journalistik
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-27918 (URN)9789144100777 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2015-10-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1011-7726

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