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Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Faresjö, M. (2020). A useful guide for analysis of immune mediators in cancer by fluorochrome (Luminex) technique. In: I. Vancurova & Y. Zhu (Ed.), Immune mediators in cancer: Methods and protocols (pp. 3-13). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A useful guide for analysis of immune mediators in cancer by fluorochrome (Luminex) technique
2020 (English)In: Immune mediators in cancer: Methods and protocols / [ed] I. Vancurova & Y. Zhu, Springer, 2020, p. 3-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Immune cells and their mediators are key players in human cancer progression involving alternation in the number and function of immune cells, both peripheral and at the site of tumor. Through reliable predictive biomarkers, cancer can be predicted, and progression and response to therapy followed. Thereby immune biomarkers, e.g., cytokines and chemokines can serve as intermediate mediators of cancer diagnostics. Multiplex analysis of immune mediators in small blood volumes allows for rapid quantification of large number of circulating analytes. The fluorochrome (Luminex) technique is a bead-based sandwich immunoassay that combines the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with flow cytometry. The Luminex technique allows multiple immune mediators to be measured simultaneously in small volumes, and provides a convenient and sensitive tool for the detection of a large number of extracellular secreted cytokines and chemokines to be used in prediction and therapy prognosis of cancer.

The technique is based on so-called microspheres (beads) that serve as a solid phase for molecular detection. These individually dyed microbeads have monoclonal antibodies directed against the cyto- and chemokines of interest and allow a simultaneous detection of up to nearly 100 cyto- and chemokines in a dual-laser flow analyzer. Immune mediators can be detected in serum and plasma samples as well as in cell culture supernatants from in vitro stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This chapter describes the Luminex technique for detection of immune mediators in cancer by using magnetic bead sandwich immunoassay, with focus on some important pre-analytic factors, e.g., cell separation and cryopreservation and thawing of PBMC that may affect the outcome of detection of immune mediators. The Luminex technique thus represents a very suitable method to identify immune mediators in cancer tissues in order to diagnose and improve clinical outcome of cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Series
Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745 ; 2108
Keywords
Luminex, Immune mediators, Cancer, Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Cell separation and cryopreservation of PBMC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47485 (URN)10.1007/978-1-0716-0247-8_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077856717 (Scopus ID)978-1-0716-0246-1 (ISBN)978-1-0716-0247-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-01-22 Created: 2020-01-22 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Gimbler Berglund, I., Huus, K., Enskär, K., Møller Christensen, B., Faresjö, M. & Jacobsson, B. (2019). How do we care for children with Autism Spektrum Disorder when coming for a procedure requiring anesthesia?. In: : . Paper presented at INSAR 2019 Annual Meeting, Montreal, Canada, May 1-4, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do we care for children with Autism Spektrum Disorder when coming for a procedure requiring anesthesia?
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47822 (URN)
Conference
INSAR 2019 Annual Meeting, Montreal, Canada, May 1-4, 2019
Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved
Rundqvist, L., Engvall, J., Blomstrand, P., Carlsson, E. & Faresjö, M. (2019). Resting level of insulin-like growth factor 1 is not at play in cardiac enlargement in endurance-trained adolescents. BioMed Research International, 1-7, Article ID 9647964.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resting level of insulin-like growth factor 1 is not at play in cardiac enlargement in endurance-trained adolescents
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2019 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, p. 1-7, article id 9647964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. The study aimed to investigate resting levels of several selected growth and metabolic hormones in a group of 24 endurance-trained adolescents (aged 13-19 years) compared with 24 untrained age- and sex-matched controls, and to investigate if increased cardiac dimensions were related to these hormones at rest with emphasis on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).

Methods. The hormones (cortisol, IGF-1, IGF-2, follicle-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone) were analysed with chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) or multiplex fluorochrome (Luminex) technique. Cardiac dimensions were assessed by echocardiographic examination at rest. Peak oxygen uptake was obtained by a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill.

Results. Circulating levels of analysed hormones at rest did not differ between the groups. A correlation was found between increased cardiac dimensions and IGF-1 in the controls, but not in the active group. This correlation declined also among the controls when the cardiac parameters were indexed for body surface area.

Conclusion. Increased cardiac dimensions in endurance-trained adolescents could not be related to resting levels of hormones associated with growth and metabolism, including IGF-1 and GH. In addition, the resting levels of these hormones seem not to be affected by intense regular endurance exercise in adolescents. These findings may contribute to the knowledge about cellular signaling that trigger growth as well as cardiac adaptation to endurance training in young athletes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43514 (URN)10.1155/2019/9647964 (DOI)000491982600002 ()31663002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073601637 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Tompa, A., Åkesson, K., Karlsson, S. & Faresjö, M. (2019). Suppressed immune profile in children with type 1 diabetes in combination with celiac disease. In: : . Paper presented at ESCCA 2019, Flowrescence in the Fjords, Bergen, Norway, 18-21 September 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suppressed immune profile in children with type 1 diabetes in combination with celiac disease
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins (APP), adipocytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in different pathophysiological processes of inflammatory character. The role of the different immune markers and the peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in combination with celiac disease (CD) is not fully understood and is not well studied. The purpose of the present study was therefore to acquire more knowledge and to gain deeper understanding on peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children with T1D and/or CD.

Methods: The study included children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD (n=18), children with T1D (n=27) or CD (n=16), and reference children (n=42).

Blood samples were collected, and serum stored in -80°C until analysis, avoiding multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The inflammatory cyto/chemokines (IL-1β, -5, -6, -8, -9, -10, -13, -15, -17A, -22, -25, -33, IFN-γ, TNF-α, G-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β), diabetes related immune markers (visfatin, resistin), APP (procalcitonin (PTC), ferritin, tissue protein activator, fibrinogen, serum amyloid A) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -2, -3) were analyzed with Luminex technique using Bio-Plex assays. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify similarities/differences in immune profiles between children with double diagnosis and children with single diagnosis and reference children. Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of the different diagnosis groups within the clusters and whole cohort, respectively.

Results: The largest cluster included 75% of the participants and the diagnose distribution in the cluster were very similar to the distribution in the whole study cohort. The remaining 25% were divided in two smaller clusters representing 15.5% and 6.5% respectively. The major finding of this study showed that children with double diagnosis had (1) lower serum levels of IL-22, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 compared to children with T1D; and (2) lower serum levels of the APC associated chemokine MIP-1α compared to reference children, observed in the main cluster. Most of these observations were also seen in the whole cohort.  

Conclusion: Our observations indicate decreased serum levels of IL-22, MIP-1α, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 in children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD. These results indicate a suppressed immune profile including Th17 cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, diabetes-related and matrix metalloproteinase immune markers. Functional studies of the involved immune cells (CD4+ Treg, CD8+ Treg, NK-cells and dendritic cells) could contribute to elucidate the heterogeneous immunological processes in children with more than one autoimmune disease.

National Category
Pediatrics Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47397 (URN)
Conference
ESCCA 2019, Flowrescence in the Fjords, Bergen, Norway, 18-21 September 2019
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Rundqvist, L., Engvall, J., Faresjö, M. & Blomstrand, P. (2018). Left ventricular diastolic function is enhanced after peak exercise in endurance-trained adolescents as well as in their non-trained controls. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 38(6), 1054-1061
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Left ventricular diastolic function is enhanced after peak exercise in endurance-trained adolescents as well as in their non-trained controls
2018 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1054-1061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of the study were to explore the temporal change of cardiac function after peak exercise in adolescents, and to investigate how these functional changes relate to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). The cohort consisted of 27 endurance-trained adolescents aged 13-19 years, and 27 controls individually matched by age and gender. Standard echocardiography and colour tissue Doppler were performed at rest, and immediately after as well as 15 min after a maximal cardio pulmonary exercise test (CPET) on a treadmill. The changes in systolic and diastolic parameters after exercise compared to baseline were similar in both groups. The septal E/e'-ratio increased immediately after exercise in both the active and the control groups (from 9·2 to 11·0; P<0·001, and from 8·7 to 10·2; P = 0·008, respectively). In a comparison between the two groups after CPET, the septal E/e'-ratio was higher in the active group both immediately after exercise and 15 min later compared to the control group (P = 0·007 and P = 0·006, respectively). We demonstrated a positive correlation between VO2max and cardiac function including LVEF and E/e' immediately after CPET, but the strongest correlation was found between VO2max and LVEDV (r = 0·67, P<0·001) as well as septal E/e' (r = 0·34, P = 0·013). Enhanced diastolic function was found in both groups, but this was more pronounced in active adolescents. The cardiac functional response to exercise, in terms of LVEF and E/e', correlates with the increase in VO2 uptake. These findings in trained as well as un-trained teenagers have practical implications when assessing cardiac function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
E/e′, diastolic function, echocardiography, heart, systolic function, training, youngster
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41801 (URN)10.1111/cpf.12534 (DOI)000446073500019 ()29947056 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054186924 (Scopus ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12 (Local ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12 (Archive number)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Tompa, A., Nilsson-Bowers, A. & Faresjö, M. (2018). Subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi Lymphocytes Are in General Not Influenced by Isolation and Long-Term Cryopreservation. Journal of Immunology, 201(6), 1799-1809
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi Lymphocytes Are in General Not Influenced by Isolation and Long-Term Cryopreservation
2018 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 6, p. 1799-1809Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several key factors can affect the outcome of immunological studies; isolation/cryopreservation can possibly alter T, B, NK, and T-regulatory (Treg) cell marker expression patterns. Blood samples from 50 blood donors supplemented with Na-heparin or K2EDTA were handled within 4 and 24 h after blood sampling. PBMC were isolated with different density gradients. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular and extracellular CD markers was performed on blood samples freshly isolated PBMC, and PBMC was thawed 6 and 12 mo post-cryopreservation for the purpose of identifying B, NK, Th, T-cytotoxic, and Treg cells. No differences were observed in the percentages for CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, or CD56+CD16+ cells within 24 h of sampling regardless of which supplement or isolation techniques were used. Differentiated (diff) CD4+ cells were in general less affected by isolation and cryopreservation than diff CD8+ cells. Terminally diff effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not affected by either isolation of lymphocytes or cryopreservation. In contrast, naive and early-diff effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ cells were affected by isolation and cryopreservation. The percentages of Treg cells defined as CD4+CD25hi expressing CD101 or CD129, CD4+CD25hiCD127, and CD4+CD25hiCD127FOXP3+, respectively, remained stable after isolation and cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD127, with or without FOXP3, were not affected by isolation/cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD39, contrary to CD45RA, on CD4+CD25+CD127 cells with or without FOXP3 were not affected by either isolation or cryopreservation. In conclusion, subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Immunologists, 2018
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41150 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1701409 (DOI)000443585800020 ()30082322 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053143384 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Björkman, B., Gimbler Berglund, I., Faresjö, M., Enskär, K. & Huus, K. (2017). Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?. Paper presented at 62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography. Acta Radiologica, 58(1 Suppl.), 16-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?
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2017 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 1 Suppl., p. 16-16Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Anxiety is often experienced by children undergoing health care procedures, and children with autism spectrum disorders (ADS) experience more anxiety than typically developed children. A prerequisite for obtaining an optimum procedure is firstly based on the health care provider’s knowledge about children with ASD, but may also depend on the use of guidelines. Two previous national surveys showed, that none radiology or paediatric departments and a minority of anaesthesiology departments throughout Sweden use specific guidelines when seeing children with ASD. Following, the purpose was to develop guidelines to use when caring for and preparing children with ASD in those settings.

Methods: A modified Delphi method was used, including19 experts identified from the two afore mentioned surveys. The questions considered in the process, proceeded from previous research and the results from the surveys. The experts’ responses regarding the importance of each item, were analysed and scrutinized between each round.

Results: The Delphi process resulted in guidelines consisting of 15 items and a checklist with 16 aspects. The items cover the areas: planning and involving parents, features in the environment, use of time, communication, thehealth care professionals. The checklist covers the child’spattern of communication, anxiety, sensory stimuli, special interests and likes/dislikes.

Conclusions: To obtain an optimum caring encounter when a child with ASD is seen in the preoperative and radiology setting, a meticulous planning is important and the environment should be adjusted for the needs of the child. To accomplish this, guidelines need to be in place and be followed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37303 (URN)000404621700013 ()
Conference
62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Gimbler Berglund, I., Björkman, B., Enskär, K., Faresjö, M. & Huus, K. (2017). Management of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the anesthesia and radiographic context. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 38(3), 187-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the anesthesia and radiographic context
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: As a primary objective, this study purports to develop guidelines to better care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly regarding these children's preparation for anesthesia and radiologic procedures.

Methods: Using a Delphi method with an online distribution of questionnaire, guidelines for caring for children with ASD were created. Twenty-one participants were included in the expert panel. These participants were working with children with ASD in several anesthesia and radiology departments in Sweden. A list of items was created from a previous survey and the literature. In the first round, the items with <60% agreement were discarded. Items were merged, and a new list was created. Two more similar rounds were performed. In the last 2 rounds, 21 participants responded, and 80% agreement was considered to be consensus.

Results: The final guidelines consisted of 14 items and a checklist of 16 factors. The 5 areas covered by the items and the checklist were as follows: planning involving parents/guardians, features in the environment, and use of time, communication, and the health care professionals. The organization was important in making it possible for the health care professional to care for the individual child according to the child's needs. It was important to involve the parents/guardians to obtain knowledge about the functioning of the child.

Conclusion: A caring encounter involving a child with ASD in the anesthesia and radiology contexts requires advance planning, catered specifically to the individual needs of each child. To accomplish this, general knowledge regarding ASD and ASD's particular manifestation in the child entrusted to their care, is required from the health care workers. The organization needs to have structures in place to facilitate this process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2017
National Category
Nursing Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35267 (URN)10.1097/DBP.0000000000000432 (DOI)000399585500004 ()28333847 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015965039 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Björkman, B., Gimbler Berglund, I., Enskär, K., Faresjö, M. & Huus, K. (2017). Peri-radiographic guidelines for children with autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide survey in Sweden. Child Care Health and Development, 43(1), 31-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peri-radiographic guidelines for children with autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide survey in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of guidelines and routines used nationwide when children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are taken care of and examined in a radiology department during a peri-radiographic process.

METHOD: A nationwide survey was compiled and distributed to 94 radiology departments throughout Sweden, i.e. those performing more than 100 000 radiographic examinations annually. The survey was designed as a web questionnaire with seven questions on possible guidelines and/or routines for the departments when preparing and taking care of children with ASD in conjunction with a radiographic procedure. The data were scrutinized, using descriptive statistics.

RESULTS: In total, 86 radiology departments responded to the survey (response rate 92%). Of those departments, 40 did not examine children with ASD. None of the departments included in the study had existing guidelines underpinning the routines when preparing and performing radiographic examinations for children diagnosed with ASD. A few departments (n = 8) would set aside more time for the procedure if it were known in advance that the child to be examined had been diagnosed with ASD. Also, some departments (n = 7) had radiographers who were more experienced in the care of children who would be appointed to perform examinations for children with ASD.

CONCLUSION: It is suggested that guidelines should be developed in order to increase interaction in a supportive way and decrease anxiety during the peri-radiographic process with children with ASD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
autism spectrum disorder (ASD); children; guidelines; preparation; radiographic procedure
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32259 (URN)10.1111/cch.12427 (DOI)000396460600003 ()27807874 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84997047807 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-10 Created: 2016-11-10 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Rundqvist, L., Engvall, J., Faresjö, M., Carlsson, E. & Blomstrand, P. (2017). Regular endurance training in adolescents impacts atrial and ventricular size and function. European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, 18(6), 681-687
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regular endurance training in adolescents impacts atrial and ventricular size and function
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2017 (English)In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 681-687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aims of the study were to explore the effects of long-term endurance exercise on atrial and ventricular size and function in adolescents and to examine whether these changes are related to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max).

Methods and results: Twenty-seven long-term endurance-trained adolescents aged 13–19 years were individually matched by age and gender with 27 controls. All participants, 22 girls and 32 boys, underwent an echocardiographic examination at rest, including standard and colour tissue Doppler investigation. VO2max was assessed during treadmill exercise. All heart dimensions indexed for body size were larger in the physically active group compared with controls: left ventricular end-diastolic volume 60 vs. 50 mL/m2 (P <0.001), left atrial volume 27 vs. 19 mL/m2 (P <0.001), and right ventricular (RV) and right atrial area 15 vs. 13 and 9 vs. 7 cm2/m2, respectively (P <0.001 for both). There were strong associations between the size of the cardiac chambers and VO2max. Further, we found improved systolic function in the active group compared with controls: left ventricular ejection fraction 61 vs. 59% (P= 0.036), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion 12 vs. 10 mm/m2 (P= 0.008), and RV early peak systolic velocity s′ 11 vs. 10 cm/s (P = 0.031).

Conclusion: Cardiac remodelling to long-term endurance exercise in adolescents is manifested by an increase in atrial as well as ventricular dimensions. The physically active group also demonstrated functional remodelling with an increase in TAPSE and systolic RV wall velocity. These findings have practical implications when assessing cardiac enlargement and function in physically active youngsters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
Echocardiography; Heart; Athlete; Atria; Adolescent; Exercise
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34670 (URN)10.1093/ehjci/jew150 (DOI)000405182500014 ()27406576 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029069005 (Scopus ID)
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Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
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