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Publications (10 of 204) Show all publications
Scott, M., Falkmer, M., Falkmer, T. & Girdler, S. (2018). Evaluating the effectiveness of an autism-specific workplace tool for employers: A randomised controlled trial. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the effectiveness of an autism-specific workplace tool for employers: A randomised controlled trial
2018 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of the Integrated Employment Success Tool (IEST™) in improving employers’ self-efficacy in modifying the workplace for individuals on the autism spectrum. Employers (N = 84) were randomised to the IEST™ or support as usual groups. Measurements of self-efficacy, knowledge and attitudes towards disability in the workplace were obtained at baseline and post-test. Results revealed a significant improvement in self-efficacy within the IEST™ group between baseline and post-test (p = 0.016). At post-test, there were no significant differences between groups in relation to self-efficacy in implementing autism-specific workplace modifications and employer attitudes towards disability in the workplace. Given the lack of significant outcomes, further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of the IEST™ for employers. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #ACTRN12614000771651, registered 21/7/2014. Trial URLhttps://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366699. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorder, Complex intervention, Hiring, Vocational support, Work environment
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39857 (URN)10.1007/s10803-018-3611-0 (DOI)29767376 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047146139 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-05
Hatfield, M., Ciccarelli, M., Falkmer, T. & Falkmer, M. (2018). Factors related to successful transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 18(1), 3-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors related to successful transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum
2018 (English)In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescents on the autism spectrum often have difficulties with the transition from high school to post-school activities. Despite this, little is known about the transition planning processes for this group. This study explored predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors related to the transition planning processes for adolescents on the autism spectrum in Australia. The PRECEDE model guided a needs assessment, in which descriptive data about transition planning processes were collected via an online questionnaire from adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents and professionals (N = 162). Predisposing factors included: an individualised and strengths-focused approach, and adolescent motivation, anxiety and insight. Reinforcing factors included: support and guidance, skill development and real-life experiences. Enabling factors were: having a clear plan with a coordinated approach, scheduled meetings and clear formal documentation. Whilst some factors aligned with recommendations for transition planning for adolescents with disabilities in general, there were some autism-specific factors. For example: anxiety, motivation and insight were important predisposing factors, and providing choice and flexibility was an enabling factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Asperger syndrome, Child development disorder, Pervasive developmental disorder, Employment, Vocational education, College, University, Career planning and development
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35391 (URN)10.1111/1471-3802.12388 (DOI)000419513000001 ()2-s2.0-85040172767 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Cowan, G., Earl, R., Falkmer, T., Girdler, S., Morris, S. L. & Falkmer, M. (2018). Fixation patterns of individuals with and without Autism Spectrum disorder: Do they differ in shared zones and in zebra crossings?. Journal of Transport and Health, 8, 112-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fixation patterns of individuals with and without Autism Spectrum disorder: Do they differ in shared zones and in zebra crossings?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 8, p. 112-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shared zones are a contemporary traffic zone that promotes equality between multiple road users and efficiently utilizes available space, while simultaneously maintaining safety and function. As this is a relatively new traffic zone, it is important to understand how pedestrians navigate a shared zone and any potential challenges this may pose to individuals with impairments. The aim of this study was to utilize eye-tracking technology to determine fixations and fixation duration on traffic relevant objects, non-traffic relevant objects, and eye contact, in 40 individuals with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in a shared zone and a zebra crossing. It was assumed that individuals with ASD would make less eye contact in the shared zone compared to the group of typically developing adults. A total of 3287 fixations across the shared zone and zebra crossing were analysed for areas of interest that were traffic relevant, non-traffic relevant, and eye contact, and for fixation duration. Individuals with ASD did not display any difference in terms of eye contact in the shared zone and the zebra crossing when compared to the controls. All pedestrians were more likely to look at traffic relevant objects at the zebra crossing compared to the shared zone. Individuals with ASD had an overall shorter fixation duration compared to the control group, indicating people with ASD either process information quickly, or they do not process it for long enough, although these findings require further investigation. While shared zones have many benefits for traffic movement and environmental quality, it appeared that pedestrians displayed safer road crossing behaviours at a zebra crossing than in a shared zone, indicating that more education and environmental adaptations are required to make shared zones safe for all pedestrians. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Eye contact, Non-traffic relevant, Pedestrian crossing, Shared space, Traffic relevant
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38751 (URN)10.1016/j.jth.2017.12.001 (DOI)000431077800015 ()2-s2.0-85040536467 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-06 Created: 2018-02-06 Last updated: 2018-07-11Bibliographically approved
Blane, A., Falkmer, T., Lee, H. C. & Willstrand, T. D. (2018). Investigating cognitive ability and self-reported driving performance of post-stroke adults in a driving simulator. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 25(1), 44-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating cognitive ability and self-reported driving performance of post-stroke adults in a driving simulator
2018 (English)In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Safe driving is a complex activity that requires calibration. This means the driver can accurately assess the level of task demand required for task completion and can accurately evaluate their driving capability. There is much debate on the calibration ability of post-stroke drivers.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to assess the cognition, self-rated performance, and estimation of task demand in a driving simulator with post-stroke drivers and controls.

Methods

A between-groups study design was employed, which included a post-stroke driver group and a group of similarly aged older control drivers. Both groups were observed driving in two simulator-based driving scenarios and asked to complete the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) to assess their perceived task demand and self-rate their driving performance. Participants also completed a battery of psychometric tasks to assess attention and executive function, which was used to determine whether post-stroke cognitive impairment impacted on calibration.

Results

There was no difference in the amount of perceived task demand required to complete the driving task. Despite impairments in cognition, the post-stroke drivers were not more likely to over-estimate their driving abilities than controls. On average, the post-stroke drivers self-rated themselves more poorly than the controls and this rating was related to cognitive ability.

Conclusion

This study suggests that post-stroke drivers may be aware of their deficits and adjust their driving behavior. Furthermore, using self-performance measures alongside a driving simulator and cognitive assessments may provide complementary fitness-to-drive assessments, as well as rehabilitation tools during post-stroke recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Attention, Australia, calibration, cognition, executive function, task demand
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38407 (URN)10.1080/10749357.2017.1373929 (DOI)000424127300007 ()29022422 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045076824 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
Rogerson, J., Falkmer, M., Cuomo, B., Falkmer, T., Whitehouse, A., Granich, J. & Vaz, S. (2018). Parental experiences using the Therapy Outcomes by You (TOBY) application to deliver early intervention to their child with autism. Developmental Neurorehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental experiences using the Therapy Outcomes by You (TOBY) application to deliver early intervention to their child with autism
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38909 (URN)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved
Hatfield, M., Falkmer, M., Falkmer, T. & Ciccarelli, M. (2018). Process evaluation of the BOOST - A transition planning program for adolescents on the autism spectrum: A strengths-based approach. Journal of autism and developmental disorders (2), 377-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process evaluation of the BOOST - A transition planning program for adolescents on the autism spectrum: A strengths-based approach
2018 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, no 2, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A process evaluation was conducted to determine the effectiveness, usability, and barriers and facilitators related to the Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A (TM)), an online transition planning program. Adolescents on the autism spectrum (n = 33) and their parents (n = 39) provided feedback via an online questionnaire. Of these, 13 participants were interviewed to gain in-depth information about their experiences. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (i) taking action to overcome inertia, (ii) new insights that led to clear plans for the future, (iii) adolescent empowerment through strengths focus, and (iv) having a champion to guide the way. The process evaluation revealed why BOOST-A (TM) was beneficial to some participants more than others. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Asperger’s syndrome; Employment; High school; Pervasive developmental disorder; Self-determination theory; Vocational education
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37562 (URN)10.1007/s10803-017-3317-8 (DOI)000424669000005 ()29019012 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030831834 (Scopus ID)HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-10-05 Created: 2017-10-05 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Evans, K. L., Millsteed, J., Richmond, J. E., Falkmer, M., Falkmer, T. & Girdler, S. J. (2018). The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Multigenerational care, mother, parental caregiver, working women, work-life balance
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39426 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2018.1449888 (DOI)29540096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044089240 (Scopus ID)HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-07-17
McAuliffe, T., Vaz, S. V., Falkmer, T. & Cordier, R. (2017). A comparison of families of children with autism spectrum disorders in family daily routines, service usage, and stress levels by regionality. Developmental Neurorehabilitation (8), 483-490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of families of children with autism spectrum disorders in family daily routines, service usage, and stress levels by regionality
2017 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, no 8, p. 483-490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To explore whether family routines, service usage, and stress levels in families of children with autism spectrum disorder differ as a function of regionality.

Methods: Secondary analysis of data was undertaken from 535 surveys. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate differences between families living in densely populated (DP) areas and less densely populated (LDP) areas.

Results: Families living in LDP areas were found to: (1) have reduced employment hours (a two-parent household: Exp (B) = 3.48, p < .001, a single-parent household: Exp (B) = 3.32, p = .011); (2) travel greater distance to access medical facilities (Exp (B) = 1.27, p = .006); and (3) report less severe stress levels (Exp (B) = 0.22, p = .014).

Conclusions: There were no differences in family routines; however, flexible employment opportunities and travel distance to medical services need to be considered in families living in LDP areas. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
ASD, employment status, regional and remote, travel distance
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34314 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2016.1236844 (DOI)000415973000004 ()27739909 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84991035078 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Milbourn, B., Falkmer, M., Black, M. H., Girdler, S., Falkmer, T. & Horlin, C. (2017). An exploration of the experience of parents with children with autism spectrum disorder after diagnosis and intervention. Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, 5(3), 104-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploration of the experience of parents with children with autism spectrum disorder after diagnosis and intervention
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Delays and difficulties in both diagnosis and access to services can compound existing stressors experienced by families with children with autism spectrum disorder Early and accurate diagnosis and appropriate intervention may not only improve child-specific outcomes but may also mitigate some of the stressors impacting family relationships and quality of life. We aimed to understand the experience of over 500 families that had sought autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and intervention, their perceptions of the efficacy of these services, and the impact that this process had on their family life. Parents overwhelmingly described frustration with access to a timely diagnosis, specialized intervention services, and funding that impacted their family life and relationships. However, parents simultaneously reported positive perceptions of change as a consequence of diagnosis and effective intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand, 2017
Keywords
autism; diagnosis; services; family; qualitative
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39042 (URN)10.21307/sjcapp-2017-014 (DOI)000426421200003 ()HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HLKCHILDIS, HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Blane, A., Lee, H. C., Falkmer, T. & Willstrand, T. D. (2017). Assessing Cognitive Ability and Simulator-Based Driving Performance in Poststroke Adults. Behavioural Neurology, Article ID 1378308.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Cognitive Ability and Simulator-Based Driving Performance in Poststroke Adults
2017 (English)In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, article id 1378308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Driving is an important activity of daily living, which is increasingly relied upon as the population ages. It has been well-established that cognitive processes decline following a stroke and these processes may influence driving performance. There is much debate on the use of off-road neurological assessments and driving simulators as tools to predict driving performance; however, the majority of research uses unlicensed poststroke drivers, making the comparability of poststroke adults to that of a control group difficult. It stands to reason that in order to determine whether simulators and cognitive assessments can accurately assess driving performance, the baseline should be set by licenced drivers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess differences in cognitive ability and driving simulator performance in licensed community-dwelling poststroke drivers and controls. Two groups of licensed drivers (37 poststroke and 43 controls) were assessed using several cognitive tasks and using a driving simulator. The poststroke adults exhibited poorer cognitive ability; however, there were no differences in simulator performance between groups except that the poststroke drivers demonstrated less variability in driver headway. The application of these results as a prescreening toolbox for poststroke drivers is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2017
National Category
Applied Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36038 (URN)10.1155/2017/1378308 (DOI)000401871400001 ()28559646 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019858496 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0756-6862

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