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Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Zasciurinskiene, E., Lund, H., Lindsten, R., Jansson, H. & Bjerklin, K. (2019). Outcome of orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part III: a CBCT study of external apical root resorption. European Journal of Orthodontics, 41(6), 575-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part III: a CBCT study of external apical root resorption
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

No evidence is present on the risk for external apical root resorption (EARR) during orthodontic treatment (OT) of adult patients with periodontal disease.

AIM:

To examine EARR after OT in subjects with periodontal disease and to analyse how intrusion and change in inclination of the most proclined maxillary incisors influence EARR.

METHODS:

The study included 50 patients with periodontal disease. Sub-gingival debridement by ultrasonic instrumentation supplemented with hand instruments was performed by experienced dental hygienist after baseline examination for all patients. For the control group, final periodontal treatment (PT) was performed before orthodontic tooth movement. For the test group patients, final PT was performed after levelling and alignment phases were finished, before the active space closure with elastic chain and/or inter-arch elastic traction for sagittal correction was started. OT was performed with a straight-wire appliance. Micro-implants or implants were used for posterior anchorage. Cone beam computed tomography examinations were performed before and after OT. EARR of all single-rooted teeth were measured. EARR of the most proclined maxillary incisor was related to intrusion and change in inclination angle.

RESULTS:

EARR after OT was observed in median 80.7 per cent (interquartile range 22.02) of single-rooted teeth [mean 1.2 (standard deviation 0.44) mm]. In 82.3 per cent of teeth, EARR was 2 mm or less. Severe EARR was found in 8 per cent of patients and five maxillary incisors (less than 1 per cent of all teeth). The amount of intrusion and change in inclination angle of the most proclined maxillary central incisor influenced the extent of EARR. Mean EARR was significantly higher when OT lasted more than 18 months (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

OT in conjunction with PT in periodontal patients resulted in EARR in 81 per cent of all single-rooted teeth. Intrusion and change in inclination angle of the most proclined maxillary central incisor influenced the extent of EARR, as did longer OT. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46973 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cjz040 (DOI)000505544800003 ()31165877 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075092376 (Scopus ID);HHJOralIS (Local ID);HHJOralIS (Archive number);HHJOralIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Zasciurinskiene, E., Lund, H., Lindsten, R., Jansson, H. & Bjerklin, K. (2019). Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part II: a CBCT study of alveolar bone level changes. European Journal of Orthodontics, 41(6), 565-574
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in subjects with periodontal disease. Part II: a CBCT study of alveolar bone level changes
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

To examine alveolar bone level (ABL) changes before (T1) and after (T2) orthodontic treatment (OT) in subjects with periodontal disease.

METHODS:

The study included 50 subjects with periodontal disease. All patients received subgingival debridement following baseline examination. Control group patients received final periodontal treatment before the start of OT. For the test group patients final periodontal treatment was performed simultaneous to OT. OT was performed with a straight-wire appliance. Micro-implants or temporary crowns on implants were used for posterior anchorage when needed. ABL measurements of 3821 tooth surfaces were performed on cone beam computed tomography images.

RESULTS:

No difference was observed between mean ABL at T1 and T2. ABL remained unchanged on 69 per cent of surfaces. A mean of 15.6 (SD 7.4) per cent of surfaces experienced ABL gain, and a mean of 15.1 (SD 7.5) per cent was found with ABL loss. Small significant median ABL difference was observed on mesial and distal surfaces (P < 0.001). A significant difference was found between median ABL changes on mesial/distal in comparison to buccal/lingual surfaces (P < 0.01). Significantly more buccal (17.9 %) and lingual (18.5 %) surfaces experienced ABL loss when compared with mesial (11.3 %) and distal (12.0 %) surfaces (P < 0.001). Significant difference was found in the median ABL change of intruded (0.5 (IQR 0.94) mm) and non-intruded (-0.4 (IQR 1.07) mm) maxillary incisors (P = 0.04). Significant median ABL gain was found on the lingual surface of maxillary incisors, which were retroclined more than 8.6 degree and intruded more than 1.6 mm.

CONCLUSIONS:

ABL changes after periodontal-orthodontic treatment in patients with periodontal disease were small. ABL gain was more observed on mesial and distal surfaces and ABL loss on buccal and lingual surfaces. Larger orthodontic movements of maxillary incisors influenced ABL gain. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46972 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cjz039 (DOI)000505544800002 ()31276583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075103324 (Scopus ID);HHJOralIS (Local ID);HHJOralIS (Archive number);HHJOralIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, E. & Lindsten, R. (2019). Treatment of missing maxillary lateral incisors: a clinical and aesthetic evaluation. European Journal of Orthodontics, 41(3), 273-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of missing maxillary lateral incisors: a clinical and aesthetic evaluation
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether implant therapy or orthodontic space closure was the best treatment option for patients with missing maxillary lateral incisors.

Subjects and methods: The implant group (I group) consisted of 22 patients aged <26 years who had one or both maxillary lateral incisors substituted by a single implant-supported crown. The space-closure group (SC group) consisted of patients matched with I group patients based on diagnosis, gender, and number. Examinations were performed by one examiner and occurred at least 5 years after the prosthetic therapy or orthodontic treatment was finished. Clinical examination of the 44 patients involved assessing the aesthetics and gingival conditions of the implant-supported crown and the replacement canine, the occlusal morphology and the extraoral characteristics. Both the patient and examiner answered a question about their satisfaction with the aesthetic result.

Results: Of the 12 variables analysed by the examiner, one variable was significantly improved in the I group and five variables were improved in the SC group. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups for the remaining six variables. Gingival colour and crown length were better in the SC group, and crown colour was better in the I group. There were no significant differences between the groups with regards to the patient's and examiner's overall aesthetic satisfaction of the maxillary anterior teeth or between the patient's and examiner's opinion.

Conclusion: If both treatment alternatives are available, space closure is preferable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42385 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cjy061 (DOI)30215704 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066927100 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Björksved, M., Arnrup, K., Lindsten, R., Magnusson, A., Sundell, A. L., Gustafsson, A. & Bazargani, F. (2018). Closed vs open surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: surgery time, postoperative complications, and patients' perceptions. European Journal of Orthodontics, 40(6), 626-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Closed vs open surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: surgery time, postoperative complications, and patients' perceptions
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 626-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Closed and open surgical techniques are two different main approaches to surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines (PDCs). Because there is insufficient evidence to support one technique over the other, there is a need for randomized controlled trials.

Objectives: To compare surgery time, complications and patients' perceptions between closed and open surgical techniques in PDCs.

Trial design: The trial was a multicentre, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel groups randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio.

Material and methods: Study participants were 119 consecutive patients from 3 orthodontic centres, with PDCs planned for surgical exposure, randomly allocated according to a computer-generated randomization list, using concealed allocation. Full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was raised, and bone covering the canine was removed in both interventions. In closed exposure, an attachment with a chain was bonded to the canine and the flap was sutured back with the chain penetrating the mucosa. In open exposure, a window of tissue around the tooth was removed and glass ionomer cement placed on the canine crown, to prevent gingival overgrowth during spontaneous eruption. Patient perceptions were assessed with two questionnaires, for the evening on the day of operation and 7 days post-surgery.

Blinding: It was not possible to blind either patients or care providers to the interventions. The outcome assessors were blinded and were unaware of patients' intervention group.

Results: Seventy-five girls and 44 boys, mean age 13.4 years (SD 1.46) participated in the study and got either of the interventions (closed exposure, n = 60; open exposure, n = 59). Surgery time did not differ significantly between the interventions. Complications though were more severe in bilateral cases and the patients experienced more pain and impairment in the open group.

Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences regarding surgery time between the groups. Postoperative complications were similar between the groups in unilateral PDCs, but more common in the open group in bilateral cases. More patients in the open group experienced pain and impairment compared to the closed group.

Trial registration: Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02186548 and Researchweb.org, ID: 127201.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42386 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cjy070 (DOI)000456177500008 ()30321323 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Zasčiurinskienė, E., Basevičienė, N., Lindsten, R., Slotte, C., Jansson, H. & Bjerklin, K. (2018). Orthodontic treatment simultaneous to or after periodontal cause-related treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part I: Clinical outcome. A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 45(2), 213-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orthodontic treatment simultaneous to or after periodontal cause-related treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part I: Clinical outcome. A randomized clinical trial
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To compare two treatment strategies regarding the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal status in patients with plaque-induced periodontitis.

Subjects and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Fifty periodontal patients were randomly assigned to the test or control groups according to periodontal treatment timing. All patients received supra- and subgingival debridement following baseline examination. Control group patients received cause-related periodontal treatment before the start of orthodontic treatment and which was performed simultaneous to orthodontic treatment for the test group patients.

Results: No difference between the test and control groups was found regarding change of clinical attachment level (CAL) after periodontal–orthodontic treatment. Fewer sites with initial pocket depth (PD) of 4–6 mm healed after periodontal–orthodontic treatment in the test group (20.5%, IQR = 11.9%) in comparison with controls (30.4%, IQR = 27.1%) (p =.03). Anterior teeth [OR 2.5] and teeth in male patients [OR 1.6] had a greater chance for PD improvement ≥2 mm. Total periodontal–orthodontic treatment duration was significantly longer for the control group (p <.01).

Conclusions: Both groups showed a gain of CAL and a reduction in sites with PD ≥ 4 mm. Orthodontic treatment, simultaneously to the periodontal treatment, could be used in the routine treatment of patients with plaque-induced periodontitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
clinical attachment level, gingival recession, orthodontic treatment, periodontal treatment, periodontitis, pocket depth
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38627 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12835 (DOI)000419830500007 ()29106749 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040336769 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS, HHJOralIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS, HHJOralIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS, HHJOralIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Stange, K. M., Lindsten, R. & Bjerklin, K. (2016). Autotransplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor region: A long-term follow-up of 12-22 years. European Journal of Orthodontics, 38(5), 508-515
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autotransplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor region: A long-term follow-up of 12-22 years
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 508-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the long-term outcome of treatment of missing maxillary incisor teeth by transplantation of premolars, with special reference to aesthetics and patient satisfaction.

Subjects and Methods: Twenty subjects who had undergone transplantation of premolars to the maxillary incisor area were recalled for follow-up varying between 12 and 22 years post-surgery. Twelve subjects presented for examination, including radiography and three subjects participated only by answering questions. Three reference groups-general practitioners, orthodontists, and lay people-evaluated the aesthetic results from photographs. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by interviews and OHIP-14.

Results: The mean age at transplantation was 12.3 years: 1 subject had been 20 years old and 11 were in the range of 9-14 years. Twelve to 22 years after autotransplantation, 5 subjects could not be reached: of the 15 who could be contacted, the survival rate was 15 out of 15. In the 12 subjects who presented for clinical examination, 11 out of the 12 transplants were assessed as successful. Nine transplants were restored with crowns and five had been recontoured with composite build-ups. In one patient, no restorative treatment had been undertaken. The subjects were satisfied with the aesthetic result.

Conclusion: Autotransplantation of premolars is an appropriate method for treatment of missing maxillary anterior teeth. Subjects with a transplanted tooth to the maxillary anterior region perceive their oral health as good long term.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32223 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cjv078 (DOI)000386063200009 ()26490395 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84990929575 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-02 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Zasčiurinskienė, E., Lund, H., Lindsten, R., Jansson, H. & Bjerklin, K.Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part II: A CBCT study of external apical root resorption.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part II: A CBCT study of external apical root resorption
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39348 (URN)
Note

Included in thesis in submitted manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-04
Zasčiurinskienė, E., Lund, H., Lindsten, R., Jansson, H. & Bjerklin, K.Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part III: A CBCT study of alveolar bone changes.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of periodontal-orthodontic treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part III: A CBCT study of alveolar bone changes
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39349 (URN)
Note

Included in thesis in submitted manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-04
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