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Publications (10 of 171) Show all publications
Zarea, F., Burgers, J. H., Obschonka, M. & Davidsson, P. (2024). Imprinting parental signals: a key driver of network status for new spinoff firms. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imprinting parental signals: a key driver of network status for new spinoff firms
2024 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Although past research has firmly established the positive effects of network status for resource acquisition and success in entrepreneurial endeavors, we still have a fragmented, limited understanding of the actual drivers of network status emergence. Prior research has mainly focused on the post-founding phase, pointing to the importance of current employment–based and firm-level affiliations in new ventures for their future status formation. In this paper, we extend the attention to the pre-founding phase in a study of spinoffs. Building on imprinting and signaling theories, we theorize that coming from a highly reputable parent firm has a long-term positive impact on a spinoff’s subsequent status by signaling a young spinoff firm’s quality to external parties. We advance previous research by further theorizing that such imprinting is contingent on the level of knowledge relatedness between the parent and spinoff as well as on whether there exists a strategic alliance between them post-founding. In addition, we argue a positive three-way interaction among parent reputation, parent-spinoff knowledge relatedness, and the parent-spinoff strategic alliance. Our analysis of a comprehensive longitudinal sample of 162 Australian mining spinoffs (i.e., firms started by ex-employees of incumbent parent firms) and 3405 strategic alliances from 2001 to 2014 supports majority of our hypotheses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
C01, C12, C23, G40, Imprinting, L24, L26, New firms, Reputation, Signaling, Spinoffs, Status
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63615 (URN)10.1007/s11187-024-00871-w (DOI)2-s2.0-85184476919 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;938317 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;938317 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;938317 (OAI)
Available from: 2024-02-19 Created: 2024-02-19 Last updated: 2024-02-19
Sakhdari, K., Burgers, J. H. & Davidsson, P. (2023). Alliance portfolio management capabilities, corporate entrepreneurship, and relative firm performance in SMEs. Journal of small business management (Print), 61(2), 802-830
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alliance portfolio management capabilities, corporate entrepreneurship, and relative firm performance in SMEs
2023 (English)In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 802-830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article shows how small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can enhance the level of corporate entrepreneurship through alliance management capabilities. The findings from a sample of 272 suppliers to the mining industry demonstrate that the constituting dimensions of alliance portfolio management capability (that is, partnering proactiveness, relational governance, and portfolio coordination) positively affect corporate entrepreneurship. Moreover, corporate entrepreneurship mediates the effects of these dimensions on firm performance. These findings improve our understanding of how organizational capabilities enable SMEs to mitigate their lack-of-resources problem while engaging in interfirm relationships to better utilize corporate entrepreneurship for increasing firm performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Alliance portfolio management capabilities, corporate entrepreneurship, partnering proactiveness, performance, portfolio coordination, relational governance
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50853 (URN)10.1080/00472778.2020.1816433 (DOI)000949498800020 ()2-s2.0-85092356798 (Scopus ID);intsam;1477918 (Local ID);intsam;1477918 (Archive number);intsam;1477918 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-10-20 Created: 2020-10-20 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Kuckertz, A., Scheu, M. & Davidsson, P. (2023). Chasing mythical creatures – A (not-so-sympathetic) critique of entrepreneurship's obsession with unicorn startups. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 19, Article ID e00365.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chasing mythical creatures – A (not-so-sympathetic) critique of entrepreneurship's obsession with unicorn startups
2023 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 19, article id e00365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, the notion of a unicorn, a startup exceeding a premarket valuation of one billion USD, has become one of the most prominent concepts in the practical discourse of entrepreneurship. Consequently, entrepreneurs aim to build unicorns, investors want to participate in their success, policymakers strive to support their emergence, and educators present them as an ideal-type entrepreneurial activity. We challenge this view with a provocative critique of the positive mainstream perception of unicorns. First, we characterize unicorns as an ambiguous analytical category with little value for research and evidence-based policy. Second, we point to the danger of neglecting the multifaceted nature of entrepreneurship by focusing solely on extreme outliers. Third, we highlight the potentially unethical consequences of entrepreneurship's obsession with unicorns. Finally, we conclude that focusing on unicorns contributes to a biased picture of entrepreneurship that favors valuation (i.e., the unicorn) over value creation (i.e., productive entrepreneurship).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Growth, Startup, Unicorn, Valuation, Value creation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59258 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2022.e00365 (DOI)2-s2.0-85143890674 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;59258 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;59258 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;59258 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-12-30 Created: 2022-12-30 Last updated: 2023-02-20Bibliographically approved
Davidsson, P. (2023). Ditching Discovery-Creation for Unified Venture Creation Research. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 47(2), 594-612
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ditching Discovery-Creation for Unified Venture Creation Research
2023 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 594-612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extending earlier critiques, I suggest that continued use of Shanian discovery and Alvarez-Barnean creation views and their respective standpoints on “opportunities” would constrain future entrepreneurship research. Instead, I suggest venture creation be recognized as the field’s true core, with or without the opportunity concept. Within a big tent of venture creation research, researchers with different knowledge interests and varying convictions regarding the roles of agency and structure in venture creation can partake in our most valuable contribution to the broader domain of economic and organizational studies: insights into the journey from non-existence to existence of new ventures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
creation, discovery, nascent, opportunity, start-up
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54215 (URN)10.1177/10422587211030870 (DOI)000677696400001 ()2-s2.0-85109663600 (Scopus ID)HOA;;757187 (Local ID)HOA;;757187 (Archive number)HOA;;757187 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-08-13 Created: 2021-08-13 Last updated: 2023-05-04Bibliographically approved
Davidsson, P., Recker, J., Chalmers, D. & Carter, S. (2023). Environmental change, strategic entrepreneurial action, and success: Introduction to a special issue on an important, neglected topic. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 17(2), 322-334
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental change, strategic entrepreneurial action, and success: Introduction to a special issue on an important, neglected topic
2023 (English)In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 322-334Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Research Summary: The two premises that underpin this SEJ Special Issue on Environmental Change, Strategic Entrepreneurial Action, and Success are that all environmental changes provide positive potentials for some ventures, and that this has been under-emphasized in past theory and research. After stating these premises and illustrating how present research treats the environment, we proceed to explain how the five articles selected for the special issue advance our thinking in this domain. We then broaden our discussion to how future entrepreneurship research can make further progress by studying interaction among environmental changes as well as their links to entrepreneurial agents, contexts (sectoral, spatial, organizational, etc.) and the entrepreneurial artifact (emerging venture). Throughout, the focus is on the enabling rather than constraining role of environmental changes.

Managerial Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic, the digital revolution, and the sustainability transition forced by climate change demonstrate significant business impact of environmental changes, including potentials for new business initiatives. This editorial and the five vanguard articles included in this SEJ Special Issue on Environmental Change, Strategic Entrepreneurial Action, and Success outline how future research can develop better theory and evidence on this important topic. The articles address matters ranging from how COVID-19 facilitated some technology firms' recruiting and reignited media firms' dormant initiatives to how environmental degradations sparked entrepreneurial ecosystem development in Kenya, how the level of environmental dynamism at a venture's birth impact its current ability to benefit from change, and the consequences of passing on potentials provided by environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60487 (URN)10.1002/sej.1464 (DOI)000989088600001 ()2-s2.0-85159351137 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2023-09-04Bibliographically approved
Davidsson, P. (2023). Making contributions: personal reflections from the co-creative evolution of entrepreneurship research. Small Business Economics, 61, 1391-1410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making contributions: personal reflections from the co-creative evolution of entrepreneurship research
2023 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 61, p. 1391-1410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This essay reflects on the last few decades’ evolution of Ideas, Evidence, Concepts, and Methods in the multidisciplinary, multi-level, and multi-methodological field of entrepreneurship research. Using illustrations from my own career and how prior recipients of the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research guided and inspired them, I describe the journey from early empirical exploration to understand the nature of the phenomenon to more recent, endogenous theory-development and -testing, heralding each as an indispensable steppingstone in meaningful knowledge development. The essay ends with an ode to the collective, co-creating nature of our knowledge-building enterprise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Co-creation, Cross-National, Entrepreneurship, External enabler, Firm growth, History, Knowledge accumulation, New business, Opportunity, Profitability, Research collaboration, Small business, Venture creation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62633 (URN)10.1007/s11187-023-00820-z (DOI)001071473100001 ()2-s2.0-85172273172 (Scopus ID)HOA;;908661 (Local ID)HOA;;908661 (Archive number)HOA;;908661 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-10-10 Created: 2023-10-10 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Parker, S. C., Åstebro, T., Audretsch, D. B., Blackburn, R., Burke, A., Coad, A., . . . Thurik, R. (2023). “Remembering David J Storey, a pioneer of the entrepreneurship field”. Small Business Economics, 62, 1-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Remembering David J Storey, a pioneer of the entrepreneurship field”
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2023 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 62, p. 1-21Article in journal, Editorial material (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-63083 (URN)10.1007/s11187-023-00848-1 (DOI)001122180900001 ()2-s2.0-85179308829 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Zarea Fazlelahi, F., Burgers, J. H., Obschonka, M. & Davidsson, P. (2023). Spinoffs’ alliance network growth beyond parental ties: performance diminishing, then performance enhancing. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 40, 743-773
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spinoffs’ alliance network growth beyond parental ties: performance diminishing, then performance enhancing
2023 (English)In: Asia Pacific Journal of Management, ISSN 0217-4561, E-ISSN 1572-9958, Vol. 40, p. 743-773Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spinoff firms are a common phenomenon in entrepreneurship where employees leave incumbent parent firms to found their own. Like other types of new firms, such new spinoffs face liabilities of newness and smallness. Previous research has emphasised the role of the initial endowments from their parent firm to overcome such liabilities. In this study, we argue and are the first to show, that, in addition to such endowments, growing an alliance network with firms other than their parents’ is also critical for spinoff performance. Specifically, we investigate the performance effect of alliance network growth in newly founded spinoffs using a longitudinal sample of 248 spinoffs and 3370 strategic alliances in the mining industry. Drawing on theory based on the resource adjustment costs of forming alliances, we posit and find a U-shaped relationship between the alliance network growth and spinoff performance, above and beyond the parent firm’s influence. We further hypothesise and find that performance effects become stronger with increased time lags between alliance network growth and spinoff performance, and when spinoffs delay growing their alliance networks. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Strategic alliances, Network growth, Spinoff, Mining industry, Resource adjustment costs
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55602 (URN)10.1007/s10490-022-09804-1 (DOI)000742238000001 ()2-s2.0-85123128021 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;791270 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;791270 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;791270 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-01-17 Created: 2022-01-17 Last updated: 2023-06-30Bibliographically approved
Davidsson, P. & Sufyan, M. (2023). What does AI think of AI as an external enabler (EE) of entrepreneurship?: An assessment through and of the EE framework. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 20, Article ID e00413.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What does AI think of AI as an external enabler (EE) of entrepreneurship?: An assessment through and of the EE framework
2023 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 20, article id e00413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent breakthroughs make Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology a particularly potent enabler of entrepreneurship. Therefore, we use the External Enablement (EE) framework to examine AI's potentials as enabler of entrepreneurship. In doing so, we involve AI – specifically ChatGPT 4.0 – to enhance the analysis beyond our personal limitations. Through this exercise we provide insights into 1) AI technologies as enablers of entrepreneurship; 2) possible improvements of the EE framework, and 3) ChatGPT's and similar AI tools’ usefulness for entrepreneurship research more generally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Artificial intelligence, Entrepreneurship, Environmental change, External enabler
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62177 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2023.e00413 (DOI)2-s2.0-85164309615 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;897290 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;897290 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;897290 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-08-17 Created: 2023-08-17 Last updated: 2023-08-17Bibliographically approved
Steffens, P. R., Baker, T., Davidsson, P. & Senyard, J. M. (2023). When Is Less More?: Boundary Conditions of Effective Entrepreneurial Bricolage. Journal of Management, 49(4), 1277-1311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When Is Less More?: Boundary Conditions of Effective Entrepreneurial Bricolage
2023 (English)In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 1277-1311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While prior research suggests that entrepreneurial bricolage is often useful as a coping mechanism for resource-constrained new ventures, other accounts document detrimental effects of bricolage. As the conditions for effective bricolage have not been systematically examined in prior research, we develop and test theoretical explanations for some important boundary conditions. We propose that while bricolage has a positive influence through a resource replacement mechanism, it may be detrimental through the intertwined “second-best solutions” and “tinkering trap,” which together lead to an accumulation of compromises that may result in a detrimental path dependence. We hypothesize that the intensity of these counteracting mechanisms differs depending on the venture's stage of development (nascent vs. operational) and its level of growth expectations. In essence, we argue that ventures expecting to achieve more derive greater benefit from resource replacement. In addition, they are more likely to resist an accumulation of compromises. We test our hypotheses using a longitudinal study of early-stage ventures. Although the results mostly support our theory, they also point to one interesting surprise for which we extend our theorizing to propose an explanation. Counter to the prevailing view in the literature, we find that bricolage is particularly effective for developing competitiveness for early-stage ventures striving to develop and grow. Complementing this, our results suggest the net effects of bricolage may actually be detrimental to the competitiveness of operational ventures that are not actively trying to grow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
bricolage, competitiveness, growth expectations, nascent ventures
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-56061 (URN)10.1177/01492063221077210 (DOI)000778402400001 ()2-s2.0-85126027012 (Scopus ID);intsam;801070 (Local ID);intsam;801070 (Archive number);intsam;801070 (OAI)
Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2023-06-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6363-1382

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