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Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Johansson, L. (2018). Effects of using a preventive care model among persons with dementia in ordinary home and nursing home with poor nutritional status. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Evidence-based Policy in Long-term Care, 10-12 September 2018, Vienna, Austria.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of using a preventive care model among persons with dementia in ordinary home and nursing home with poor nutritional status
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42703 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference on Evidence-based Policy in Long-term Care, 10-12 September 2018, Vienna, Austria
Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Siebmanns, S., Ulander, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, L., Johansson, P. & Broström, A. (2018). Internet-based CBT for insomnia in the general population - a description of design, measurements and interventions in recent RCT studies. Paper presented at 24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018. Journal of Sleep Research, 27(1, SI), 290-291, Article ID P436.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based CBT for insomnia in the general population - a description of design, measurements and interventions in recent RCT studies
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 1, SI, p. 290-291, article id P436Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives/Introduction: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (ICBTi) has been proposed as an effective, accessible, non-pharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorder. The objective was to perform a literature review of published randomized controlled trials (RCT).

Methods: Literature review. PubMed was used to identify RCTs ofICBTi published since 2013. Keywords were insomnia, ICBT and RCT. The search resulted in 40 hits. Papers with study designs and methods not relevant to the objective were removed (n = 29). Reasons for exclusion were: only study protocol, not internet-based, and results based on old data.

Results: Design: Recruitment were done via e-mail, from websites, online ads, and advertisements in local newspapers.

Inclusion criteria: Six studies based their inclusion only on ISI score (from >7to>=15). 3 studies used a combination of ISI and DSM-IV. Two studies used DSM-IV only.

Sample sizes: 4 studies had less than 100 participants, and 2 studies over 200, the mean number was 139 participants (48-303). The mean age varied from 15 to 52 years. Significantly more female participants in all studies.

Data collection: ISI combined with sleep diary was the most commonly used primary or secondary outcome measurements (n =7), 2 used ISI only, and 2 used sleep diary only. Other common instruments were, PSQI, HADS, DBAS-16 and CES-D. All studies had pre- and post-treatment measurements, but none during the intervention. The follow-up-period varied between 8 weeks and 3 years. The most common follow-up time was 6 months (n = 4), with a range from 4 weeks3years.Intervention: Most of the studies (n = 10) used traditional ICBTi-treatments (i.e., stimulus control, sleep restriction, relaxation, sleep hygiene). One study did not include stimulus control. The treatment duration were six weeks (n = 8), eight weeks (n = 2) and nine weeks (n = 1). All except one used therapist guided support.

Results: All studies showed significant post treatment improvements on sleep outcomes.

Conclusions: All studies showed significant improvement with regard to sleep. The total number of participants in the studies was relatively low. Most studies are not based on clinical samples, which may affect the generalizability of the findings.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41659 (URN)000444228300618 ()
Conference
24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Lindmark, U., Jansson, H., Lannering, C. & Johansson, L. (2018). Oral health matters for the nutritional status of older persons: A population-based study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(5-6), 1143-1152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral health matters for the nutritional status of older persons: A population-based study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1143-1152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the association between oral health and nutritional status in the context of daily care for older people.

BACKGROUND: Oral problems often increase with age and affect a person's ability to chew and swallow. They might also influence the ability to maintain a satisfactory nutritional status. Oral health awareness is therefore of great importance in nursing care for older people.

DESIGN: A retrospective cross-sectional study.

METHODS: Data from the Swedish quality register, Senior Alert, were used, including structured assessments of both oral and nutritional status using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide-Jönköping and the Mini Nutritional Assessment. In total, 1,156 persons (mean age: 82.8 ± 7.9) had both oral and nutritional assessments registered by the nursing staff in daily care.

RESULTS: Approximately 29% of participants had moderate oral health problems. Another 12% had severe problems. Over 60% of the persons were considered at risk of malnutrition or were malnourished. There was a weak correlation between poor nutritional status and poor oral health, and approximately one-third of the persons who were at risk or malnourished had simultaneous oral problems. A multivariate logistic regression revealed that when problems involving voice and swallowing were present, there was also a greater possibility of being assessed as at risk of malnourishment or being malnourished.

CONCLUSION: There is a relationship between oral health problems and nutritional status, indicating the importance of evaluating oral health status in older persons with nutritional problems.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff involved in care for older people should be aware of the importance of including regular oral health check-ups in their work. There is also a need for nursing staff members and oral health professionals to exchange knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
assessment, elder care, nutrition, older people, oral care
National Category
Dentistry Geriatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40998 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14146 (DOI)000428419400074 ()29076209 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044286602 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Johansson, L. & Silén, M. (2018). Research methods in nursing students’ Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study. Nurse Education Today, 66, 187-193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research methods in nursing students’ Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study
2018 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 66, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: During the nursing programme in Sweden, students complete an independent project that allows them to receive both a professional qualification as a nurse and a Bachelor's degree. This project gives students the opportunity to develop and apply skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making, thus preparing them for their future work. However, only a few, small-scale studies have analysed the independent project to gain more insight into how nursing students carry out this task.

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to describe the methods, including ethical considerations and assessment of data quality, applied in nursing students’ independent Bachelor's degree projects in a Swedish context.

Design: A descriptive study with a quantitative approach.

Methods: A total of 490 independent projects were analysed using descriptive statistics.

Results: Literature reviews were the predominant project form. References were often used to support the analysis method. They were not, however, always relevant to the method. This was also true of ethical considerations. When a qualitative approach was used, and data collected through interviews, the participants were typically professionals. In qualitative projects involving analysis of biographies/autobiographies or blogs participants were either persons with a disease or next of kin of a person with a disease.

Conclusions: Although most of the projects were literature reviews, it seemed unclear to the nursing students how the data should be analysed as well as what ethical issues should be raised in relation to the method. Consequently, further research and guidance are needed. In Sweden, independent projects are not considered research and are therefore not required to undergo ethics vetting. However, it is important that they be designed so as to avoid possible research ethics problems. Asking persons about their health, which occurred in some of the empirical projects, may therefore be considered questionable. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Academic as topic, Baccalaureate, Dissertations, Education, Nursing, Nursing education research, Writing, adolescent, female, human, male, methodology, nursing education, nursing student, scientific literature, Sweden, young adult, Academic Dissertations as Topic, Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate, Humans, Research Design, Students, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40978 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2018.04.006 (DOI)000433645200031 ()29709306 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046169098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Ernsth-Bravell, M., Johansson, L. & Finkel, D. (2018). Using National Quality Registries In Gerontological Research: Pros and Cons. Paper presented at The Gerontological Society of America's 70th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, November 14-18, 2018. Innovation in Aging, 2(suppl_1), 149-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using National Quality Registries In Gerontological Research: Pros and Cons
2018 (English)In: Innovation in Aging, ISSN 1556-343X, Vol. 2, no suppl_1, p. 149-149Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Health care in Sweden usually focuses on single diseases and is less prepared to treat people with multimorbidity. Combining different national quality registries (NQR) can provide a broader picture of health care, preventive care, and health-promoting care of older people with multimorbidity. The aim of this study was to explore how NQRs can be used in gerontological health care research. A descriptive mixed-method study, including a case report and statistical analysis, was performed. Nine National Quality Registries, three health registries and a social care registry maintained by the Swedish government were individually matched to an older population (birth year 1896 to 1958) in the Swedish Twin Registry (n≈44000). Factor analysis demonstrated the people tended to fall into one of 4 clusters of registries: stroke/dementia/hip, heart/diabetes, arthritis-related, and other. Men were more highly represented in the heart/diabetes cluster. People in the arthritis cluster had the lowest mean age; people in the stroke/dementia/hip cluster had the highest mean age. 161 people were identified as “most ill elderly” (according to the definition by the Swedish government). Two of them were randomly selected for case reports. Each case appeared in 6–7 of the health quality registries, providing sufficient information to track their progression through the health care system until the point of death. The results highlight both pros and cons of using the quality registries as the basis for analysis and “registry-enriched” research designs, but more research needs to be performed to understand how NQRs can be used in gerontological research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42705 (URN)10.1093/geroni/igy023.540 (DOI)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Conference
The Gerontological Society of America's 70th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, November 14-18, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Siebmanns, S., Ulander, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, L., Johansson, P. & Broström, A. (2018). "You can’t always get what you want” - methodological challenges with an internet-based CBT intervention for insomnia among patients with cardiovascular disease. Paper presented at 24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018. Journal of Sleep Research, 27(1, SI), 291-291, Article ID P437.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"You can’t always get what you want” - methodological challenges with an internet-based CBT intervention for insomnia among patients with cardiovascular disease
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 1, SI, p. 291-291, article id P437Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives/Introduction: Internet‐based cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (ICBTi) is a frequently used intervention. Published studies are promising, but methodological limitations (e.g., heterogeneity, low number of participants, unclear adherence to the intervention) have been reported. The aim was to describe methodological challenges perceived in the Hit‐IT study, an ongoing ICBTi study for patients with insomnia and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

The Hit‐IT study: Design: RCT with 1‐year follow‐up. All patients with CVD (i.e., myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and angina) from 6 primary care centers are screened for insomnia and during a clinical examination diagnosed according to DSM‐V criteria.Intervention: 9 weeks I‐CBTi (1‐week introduction, 2 weeks psychoeducation on CVD/insomnia, 6 weeks of sleep hygiene, stimulus control and sleep restriction) vs 3 weeks internet‐based sleep hygiene education.Questionnnaires: Sleep (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, sleep diary), depressive‐ and cardiac symptoms (Patient Health Qurestionnaire‐9, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire) and Quality of Life (SF‐12) at baseline, during and after intervention (after 6 and 12 months).

Methods: Interim analysis with descriptive statistics.

Results: Out of 2170 approached patients with diagnosed CVD1508 (70%) responded (No=1330/Yes=178). Of the 178 approvals (124 men/54 women), 54 did not complete internet‐based screening (no e‐mail, declined participation and for unknown reasons). Of the 124 participants who completed screening, 40 (34 men/6 women, age range 42‐84 years) were excluded (ISI < 8). In addition, 32 were excluded after telephone contact and clinical examination (declined participation n = 10, no clinical insomnia n = 14, sleep apnea n = 4,restless legs n = 2, epilepsy n = 1, pharmacological side effect n = 1). Currently 46 participants have been randomized in the Hit‐IT study (15 females, 31 males, mean age 71 years/Range 41‐92 years). 19 participants have completed control group (1 dropout related to technical problems, 3 in treatment). In the intervention group, 6 have completed, 4 intentions to treat, 3 dropouts (n = 2 unknown reason, n = 1 technical problems), 10 participants in treatment.

Conclusions: Clear methodological challenges with regard to the strenuous patient inclusion process are identified. The current study has a higher mean age and higher number of participating men than current ICBTi studies in general population.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Neurology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41696 (URN)000444228300619 ()
Conference
24th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), Basel, SWITZERLAND, SEP 25-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Johansson, L., Wijk, H. & Christensson, L. (2017). Improving Nutritional Status of Older Persons with Dementia Using a National Preventive Care Program. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 21(3), 292-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Nutritional Status of Older Persons with Dementia Using a National Preventive Care Program
2017 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 292-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the outcome of change in body weight associated with use of a structured preventive care process among persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. The preventive care process is a pedagogical model used in the Senior Alert (SA) quality register, where nutrition is one of the prioritized areas and includes four steps: assessment, analysis of underlying causes, actions performed and outcome.

DESIGN: An analysis of data from SA with a pre-post design was performed.

SETTING: The participants were living in ordinary housing or special housing in Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: 1912 persons, 65 years and older, registered in both SA and the dementia quality register Svedem were included.

INTERVENTION: A national preventive care program including individualized actions.

MEASUREMENTS: The Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form was used to assess nutritional status at baseline. Body weight was measured during baseline and follow-up (7-106 days after baseline).

RESULTS: 74.3% persons were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Those at risk of malnutrition or malnourished who were registered in all four steps of the preventive care process, increased in body weight from baseline (Md 60.0 kg) to follow-up (Md 62.0 kg) (p=0.013). In those with incomplete registration no increase in body weight was found.

CONCLUSION: Using all steps in the structured preventive care process seems to improve nutritional status of persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. This study contributes to the development of evidence-based practice regarding malnutrition and persons with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Nursing process, nutrition assessment, quality improvement, registers
National Category
Geriatrics Nutrition and Dietetics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35401 (URN)10.1007/s12603-016-0737-7 (DOI)000396203100010 ()28244569 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84969941150 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Siebmanns, S., Ulander, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, L., Johansson, P. & Broström, A. (2017). Insomnia in patients with cardiovascular disease - a review of causes, consequences and nursing interventions. Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2017, 18-20 May 2017, Jönköping, Sweden. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(Suppl. 1), S31-S31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insomnia in patients with cardiovascular disease - a review of causes, consequences and nursing interventions
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S31-S31Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Insomnia is defined as a subjective complaint of difficulty to initiate sleep, difficulty to maintain sleep, and early morning awakenings that occur at a minimum of 3 nights per week for 3 months. The prevalence of insomnia in the general adult population is estimated to 12–20%. The prevalence is even higher among those with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Insomnia has a significant impact on the individual’s health and quality of life.

Aim: To examine causes, consequences and nursing interventions for insomnia in patients with CVD.

Design: Literature review.

Method: Electronic search through PubMed and Cinahl for studies published 2001-2016. Insomnia, CVD, causes, consequences, interventions and nurse-led intervention were used as keywords. Detected duplicates, irrelevant studies and others (i.e., editorials, letters) were removed. “Insomnia and CVD” resulted in 214 hits, “insomnia and CVD and causes” in 394 hits, “insomnia and CVD and consequences” in 35 hits, and “insomnia and CVD and interventions” resulted in 51 hits.

Results: Insomnia causes impaired daytime functioning, poorer cognitive function and a feeling of isolation. The pathophysiological consequences of insomnia are associated with increased risk for arteriosclerosis and CVD (i.e., caused by an increased inflammatory processes). Pharmacological treatment for insomnia have been used for some time (i.e., sedative, hypnotics and antidepressant), but there are concerns about tolerance and dependence, as well as other side effects (i.e., falls, cognitive changes and unusual sleep behaviours) which requires a thorough risk and benefit analysis before prescription. Non-pharmacological treatments such as Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and internet-based CBT (I-CBT) for insomnia, led by therapists, is a less expensive intervention used in previous studies for othe rpatient groups. Despite positive results for both CBT andI-CBT (i.e., improved performance, increased quality of life and reduced symptom burden) in these studies no nurse-led interventions (i.e., of any type) intended for patients with CVD and insomnia were found.

Conclusion: I-CBT for insomnia seems to be an accessible and effective treatment for other patient groups. The lack of nurse-led interventions, highlights the need for future studies in patients with CVD and insomnia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36001 (URN)000401775600051 ()
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2017, 18-20 May 2017, Jönköping, Sweden
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2017-06-12Bibliographically approved
Siebmanns, S., Ulander, M., Sandberg, J., Johansson, L., Johansson, P. & Broström, A. (2017). Internet-based Intervention to treat insomnia in patients with cardiovascular disease. Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2017, 18-20 May 2017, Jönköping, Sweden. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(Suppl. 1), S75-S75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based Intervention to treat insomnia in patients with cardiovascular disease
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S75-S75Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Insomnia (i.e., trouble initiating sleep,maintaining sleep or difficulties getting enough sleep) is a prevalent problem among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is associated with physical and mental symptoms such as impaired daytime functioning, worries and depressive symptoms. Recent studies in other patient groups have described Internet-based Cognitive behavioral treatment (I-CBT) as a promising accessible and cost effective intervention. Few if any studies are conductedin CVD patients with insomnia despite the possibility of reduced symptom burden, reduced cardiovascular morbidity and improved quality of life (QoL).

Aim: To describe the design, content and measures in theHit-IT study, an intervention developed to treat insomnia in patients with CVD.

Design: An explorative design with 1 year followup including 200 primary care patients with CVD and insomnia from 4 centers. Patients will be randomized to 9 weeks of I-CBT, or to a control group receiving internetbased sleep hygiene without support.

CONTENT: The I-CBT intervention starts with a 1 week introduction, 2 weeks of psychoeducation (i.e., CVD and insomnia), followed by a 6 weeks treatment part (i.e., sleep hygiene, stimulus control and sleep restriction). Participants can communicate with a nurse and receive feedback during treatment. A psychologist will act as back-up.

MEASURES: Questionnaires will be administered at baseline, during and post intervention at 6 and 12 months’. The questionnaires will focus on e.g., educational effects, as well as on effects regarding symptoms; sleep/insomnia (PSQI, ISI, ESS, sleep diary), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), as well as QoL (SF12). The participants’ experience of the program will be explored by repeated interviews (at baseline, after 3 weeks, 6 weeks and after the intervention).

Conclusion: Depending on its effectiveness a nurseled I-CBT program can be a possible tool for insomnia treatment in cardiovascular care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35921 (URN)000401775600127 ()
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2017, 18-20 May 2017, Jönköping, Sweden
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2017-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lannering, C., Ernsth-Bravell, M. & Johansson, L. (2017). Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons: nursing staff’s experiences of a structured preventive care process. Health & Social Care in the Community, 25(3), 1011-1020
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons: nursing staff’s experiences of a structured preventive care process
2017 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 1011-1020Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A structured and systematic care process for preventive work, aimed to reduce falls, pressure ulcers and malnutrition among older people, has been developed in Sweden. The process involves risk assessment, teambased interventions and evaluation of results. Since development, this structured work process has become web-based and has been implemented in a national quality registry called ‘Senior Alert’ and used countrywide. The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff’s experience of preventive work by using the structured preventive care process as outlined by Senior Alert. Eight focus group interviews were conducted during 2015 including staff from nursing homes and homebased nursing care in three municipalities. The interview material was subjected to qualitative content analysis. In this study, both positive and negative opinions were expressed about the process. The systematic and structured work flow seemed to only partly facilitate care providers to improve care quality by making better clinical assessments, performing team-based planned interventions and learning from results. Participants described lack of reliability in the assessments and varying opinions about the structure. Furthermore, organisational structures limited the preventive work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
falls prevention, home care, nursing care of older people, nursing homes, nutrition, risk assessment
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32100 (URN)10.1111/hsc.12400 (DOI)000400367700019 ()27730698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995426811 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-27 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7101-3165

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