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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Engström, A., Barry, D., Sollander, K., Edh Mirzaei, N. & Johansson, A. (2019). Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs. In: Academy of Management Proceedings: . Paper presented at 79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM) 2019, August 9-13, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Academy of Management, Article ID 14906.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs
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2019 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2019, article id 14906Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organizational Ambidexterity (OA)–the ability to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation–is increasingly being advocated as a way to gain competitive advantage. Most of the work on OA has focused on large, multi-divisional organizations, resulting in frameworks and prescriptions that have little utility for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With this in mind, we report on the first year of an exploratory, quasi-experimental study of ambidexterity within six small-to-medium manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. The research is characterized by an emic, ‘invented here’ approach, where companies closely examine their current exploration and exploitation practices, use their findings to formulate more advanced OA approaches uniquely suited to their values and circumstances, and iteratively apply and refine these over a four year period. It appears that the construct of ‘unplanned’ and associated sub-constructs such as ‘disturbance, crashes, and interruption’ could be an important key to framing and improving OA within these SMEs and perhaps more generally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2019
Series
Academy of Management Proceedings, ISSN 0065-0668, E-ISSN 2151-6561 ; 1
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45623 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2019.14906abstract (DOI)
Conference
79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM) 2019, August 9-13, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Meisiek, S. & Barry, D. (2018). Finding the sweet spot between art and business in analogically mediated inquiry. Journal of Business Research, 85, 476-483
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finding the sweet spot between art and business in analogically mediated inquiry
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 85, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a longitudinal study, we followed 19 companies that invited artists to help their employees become more innovative. The purpose of the projects was to see if working artistically with a variety of media around organizational concerns could help employees question their habitual ways of seeing, knowing, and acting—i.e., their work epistemes. Following an artist's lead, employees created and interpreted colorful artifacts that functioned as analogs to their workplace and practices. The outcomes varied greatly. In some cases, the analogous artifacts became rich signifiers for collective sensemaking. In other cases, employees were lost in reflection. Comparing the cases, we found that there are “sweet spots” where stakeholders maintained a meaningful and dynamic balance between working artistically and business concerns. With the “sweet spot” concept, our study contributes to the literature on the role of arts-based methods for collective sensemaking, as well as the literature on epistemic objects in organizing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Sensemaking; Innovation; Epistemic objects; Arts-based methods
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34360 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.10.026 (DOI)000428227100045 ()2-s2.0-85042446945 (Scopus ID)IHHMMTCIS (Local ID)IHHMMTCIS (Archive number)IHHMMTCIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Barry, D., Caccamo, M., Ots, M. & Markowska, M. (2017). Alterities and Innovation: Conjectures from Haute Cuisine. In: : . Paper presented at 33rd EGOS Colloquium in Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017. European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alterities and Innovation: Conjectures from Haute Cuisine
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS), 2017
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38103 (URN)
Conference
33rd EGOS Colloquium in Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Barry, D. (2017). Design sweets, C-Suites, and the Candy Man factor. Journal of Marketing Management, 33(3-4), 305-311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design sweets, C-Suites, and the Candy Man factor
2017 (English)In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 305-311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Designerly design, e.g. design as taught in professional design schools, is becoming a mainstay within the world’s executive suites, where it is being used to form organisational structures, strategy, change, policy and more. The speed and extent of its uptake have come as quite a surprise to the traditional, analytically driven design disciplines within business studies; as is sometimes said of earthquakes, no one saw it coming. A watershed moment was when the American Broadcasting Corporation aired its ‘Deep Dive’ documentary on IDEO in 1999. The programme’s implication that design was ideal for innovation, that it could be applied to anything and the sometimes evangelical tide of design thinking literature that followed created a tectonic pull within business practice and education. I argue that this was due in part to a ‘Candy Man’ effect, where executives longing for easy, sure-fired innovation saw ABC’s sunny depiction of design, read the popular press articles and books on design thinking and swarmed in – often with unrealistic expectations and subsequent disappointment. I further suggest that we treat design thinking’s mixed reception as a call to reconsider where and how it might be applied to strategic level concerns, perhaps thinking of it as we might high end desserts and less like fields of candy canes for mass consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Design thinking, designerly design, innovation, organisation design
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34359 (URN)10.1080/0267257X.2017.1282727 (DOI)000395718700009 ()2-s2.0-85010931750 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Meisiek, S., Monthoux, P. G., Barry, D. & Austin, R. D. (2016). Four Voices: Making a difference with art in management education. In: The Routledge companion to reinventing management education: (pp. 330-341). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four Voices: Making a difference with art in management education
2016 (English)In: The Routledge companion to reinventing management education, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 330-341Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32103 (URN)9780415727372 (ISBN)9781315852430 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-10-27 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-10-27Bibliographically approved
Chilcott, M. & Barry, D. (2016). Narrating creativity: Developing an emic, first person approach to creativity research. The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work (3), 57-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narrating creativity: Developing an emic, first person approach to creativity research
2016 (English)In: The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, ISSN 1446-5019, no 3, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the complexity of workplace creativity, laboratory or survey-based quantitative research conducted in the positivist tradition supports a trend towards prescriptive 'recipied' lists for stimulating creativity. In contrast, by recognising creativity as a complex multi-level system, we were inspired by ideas from narrative therapy to develop a new narrative inquiry methodology that uses personal storytelling to collaboratively investigate, promote intelligent reflection on, and enhance the creativity process. Our aim was to explore how taking a pragmatic constructivist approach might unfold a new way of eliciting richly descriptive realworld information that exploits local situated knowledge (what we call 'emic creativity') about the individual and group creative processes within a workplace. Using a developmental application of the methodology as a single-level case study on gaming designers in Denmark, we found that the new emic creativity methodology can contribute valuable information about creativity within a particular system.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34358 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Meisiek, S. & Barry, D. (2016). Organizational studios: Enabling innovation. In: Ulla Johansson Sköldberg, Jill Woodilla, Ariane Berthoin Antal (Ed.), Artistic interventions in organizations: Research, theory and practice (pp. 225-238). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational studios: Enabling innovation
2016 (English)In: Artistic interventions in organizations: Research, theory and practice / [ed] Ulla Johansson Sköldberg, Jill Woodilla, Ariane Berthoin Antal, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 225-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge Research in Creative and Cultural Industries Management ; 4
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32105 (URN)9781138821132 (ISBN)9781315743486 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-10-28Bibliographically approved
Barry, D. (2016). Redesigning organization design. In: Sabine Junginger, Jürgen Faust (Ed.), Designing business and management: (pp. 81-92). London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Redesigning organization design
2016 (English)In: Designing business and management / [ed] Sabine Junginger, Jürgen Faust, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016, p. 81-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32104 (URN)9780857855534 (ISBN)9780857856241 (ISBN)9780857855688 (ISBN)9780857857705 (ISBN)
Note

Book chapter

Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-10-28Bibliographically approved
Barry, D. & Meisiek, S. (2015). Discovering the Business Studio. Journal of Management Education, 39(1), 153-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovering the Business Studio
2015 (English)In: Journal of Management Education, ISSN 1052-5629, E-ISSN 1552-6658, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 153-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the past decade, numerous business schools have begun experimenting with studio-based inquiry, often drawing inspiration from professional studios used within art and design schools and from business and governmental studios used for problem-solving and innovation. Business school studios vary considerably in form, ranging from temporary “pop up” studios to dedicated facilities with full-time staff, with the primary purpose of educating managers in craft, art, and design-based approaches to business problems. The jury on the studio phenomenon is out—can they deliver on their educational promise? To address this question, we pull together 25 years of studio experimentation in multiple settings, visits, and observations of studios around the world and interviews with studio makers from various disciplines. We consider the question of “what is a business studio?” in some detail, conjecture about the value that studios might have for management education, provide examples of four different business studio orientations and how these might translate into practice, and highlight what we believe to be some essentials when starting and running a business studio.

Keywords
design and business, experiential learning, management studies, problem-based learning
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32084 (URN)10.1177/1052562914532801 (DOI)2-s2.0-84921285939 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-27 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Meisiek, S. & Barry, D. (Eds.). (2014). Art and management: Special issue of Scandinavian Journal of Management, Volume 30, Issue 1. Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Art and management: Special issue of Scandinavian Journal of Management, Volume 30, Issue 1
2014 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32107 (URN)
Note

Guest editorship of special issue of Scandinavian Journal of Management, Volume 30, Issue 1

Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-10-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1613-2636

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