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Höök, A., Castor, C., Björk, M., Forsgren, E., Muszta, A. & Nilsson, S. (2024). Content validity of the electronic faces thermometer scale for pain in children: is a picture worth more than a thousand words?. Frontiers in Pain Research, 5, Article ID 1372167.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content validity of the electronic faces thermometer scale for pain in children: is a picture worth more than a thousand words?
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Pain Research, ISSN 2673-561X, Vol. 5, article id 1372167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Early recognition of pain in children is crucial, and their self-report is the primary source of information. However, communication about pain in healthcare settings can be challenging. For non-verbal communication regarding different symptoms, children prefer digital tools. The electronic Faces Thermometer Scale (eFTS) utilizes a universal design with colors, face emojis, and numbers on an 11-point scale (0–10) for pain assessment. The aim of this study was to establish content validity of the eFTS for pain assessments in children. Methods: A mixed methods design was used. The study took place at a university hospital in eastern Sweden, involving 102 children aged 8–17 years who visited outpatient clinics. Participants were presented with 17 pictures representing varying pain levels and asked to assess hypothetical pain using the eFTS. A think-aloud approach was employed, prompting children to verbalize their thoughts about assessments and the eFTS. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative statistics, together with a qualitative approach for analysis of think-aloud conversations. Results: A total of 1,734 assessments of hypothetical pain using the eFTS were conducted. The eFTS differentiated between no pain (level 0–1) and pain (level 2–10). However, no clear agreement was found in the differentiation between hypothetical pain intensity levels (level 2–10). The analysis revealed that children utilized the entire scale, ranging from no pain to high pain, incorporating numbers, colors, and face emojis in their assessments. Discussion: The variability in assessments was influenced by prior experiences, which had an impact on the statistical outcome in our study. However, employing the think-aloud method enhances our understanding of how children utilize the scale and perceive its design, including the incorporation of emotion-laden anchors. Children express a preference for using the eFTS to assess their pain during hospital visits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2024
Keywords
children, e-health, hypothetical pain, pain assessment, person-centered care, think-aloud
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-64144 (URN)10.3389/fpain.2024.1372167 (DOI)001207515500001 ()38665784 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85191320819 (Scopus ID)GOA;;949973 (Local ID)GOA;;949973 (Archive number)GOA;;949973 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, MTI2019-0011, KP2018-0023, PR2020-0026
Available from: 2024-05-07 Created: 2024-05-07 Last updated: 2024-05-07Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Björk, M., Odzakovic, E., Hellstrom, A., Sandlund, C., Ulander, M., . . . Broström, A. (2024). The ethos brief index-validation of a brief questionnaire to evaluate wellness based on a holistic perspective in patients with restless legs syndrome. Sleep and Breathing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ethos brief index-validation of a brief questionnaire to evaluate wellness based on a holistic perspective in patients with restless legs syndrome
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2024 (English)In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose The aim of this study was to validate the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) in patients with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).Methods A cross-sectional design, including 788 subjects with RLS (65% women, 70.8 years, SD 11.3) from the Swedish RLS Association, was used. A postal survey was sent out to collect data regarding socio demographics, comorbidities, and RLS-related treatment data. Questionnaires included were EBI, the Restless Legs Syndrome-6 Scale (RLS-6), Restless Legs Syndrome-Quality of Life questionnaire (RLSQoL), the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The validity and reliability of the EBI were investigated using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning (DIF) across age and gender groups, as well as insomnia, daytime sleepiness, RLS-related QoL and RLS severity were assessed.Results The results supported the unidimensionality of the EBI in the CFA (i.e., explaining 61.5% of the variance) and the Rasch model. The reliability of the EBI was confirmed using composite reliability and Cronbach's alpha. No DIF was identified for gender, age, insomnia, daytime sleepiness, RLS severity or RLS-related QoL.Conclusion The EBI showed good validity and reliability and operated equivalently for male and female patients with RLS. Accordingly, healthcare professionals can use the EBI as a psychometrically sound tool to explore and identify patient-centered problems related to the whole life situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
Restless legs syndrome, Sleep, Validity, Reliability, Ethos
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-64313 (URN)10.1007/s11325-024-03058-5 (DOI)001220948900001 ()38740633 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85192879035 (Scopus ID)HOA;;953038 (Local ID)HOA;;953038 (Archive number)HOA;;953038 (OAI)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2024-05-27 Created: 2024-05-27 Last updated: 2024-05-27
Silivri, M., Wirf, T., Hodges, E. A., Fredholm, Y. S. & Björk, M. (2023). Conversations About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights-From a School Nurse Perspective. Journal of School Nursing, 39(5), 406-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversations About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights-From a School Nurse Perspective
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2023 (English)In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 406-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Students have the right to receive education about sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The United Nations Agenda 2030 for sustainable development includes goals regarding SRHR, including the right to universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services and gender equality. The study used a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Data were collected through semistructured interviews. The results are presented in three categories and nine subcategories. The categories were "having an open attitude," "organizational prerequisites," and "challenging tasks." An open attitude was required to create confidence for both school nurses and students in SRHR conversations. Organizational prerequisites, such as planning SRHR education with others, were successful. Multicultural meetings and conversations regarding gender identity and sexual orientation were challenging tasks. Increased knowledge of SRHR and national standardized guidelines are suggested to achieve Agenda 2030 SRHR goals and to ensure equity in school health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
qualitative research, school health service, sexual and reproductive health, health promotion
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54284 (URN)10.1177/10598405211029252 (DOI)000683967900001 ()34369177 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85112357751 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;758511 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;758511 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;758511 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-08-19 Created: 2021-08-19 Last updated: 2023-09-12Bibliographically approved
Stensson, M., Norderyd, J., Van Riper, M., Marks, L. & Björk, M. (2023). Dental health care for children with Down syndrome – parents’ description of their children’s needs in dental health care settings. In: : . Paper presented at The 26th conference of the International Association for Disability and Oral Health (iADH 2022), Paris, France, 23-26 August 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental health care for children with Down syndrome – parents’ description of their children’s needs in dental health care settings
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A visit to the dental clinic may be challenging for a child with Downs syndrome due to medical and oral health problems as well as communication problems.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore how parents of children with Down syndrome describe their child’s needs in the dental health care setting.

Method: In a online survey concerning parental experiences with dental health care in Sweden, free comments were analysed with content analysis. By answering the survey, parents consented to participate. Ethical approval was obtained by from the Regional Ethics Committee for Human Research at Linköping University, Sweden.

Result: The analyse resulted in five categories: “Need for continuity of care in dental health care”; “Need for dental health care professionals to have knowledge and expertise in caring for children with Down syndrome and other disabilities”; “Need for dental health care professionals to use a caring approach with children with Down syndrome”; “Need for the child with Down syndrome to be prepared to participate in their dental health care visit” “Need for the child with Down syndrome to be given the same rights as typically developing children”.

Conclusion: To support children with Down syndrome in an optimal way, dental health care needs to be tailored to meet the child’s unique needs. When visiting dental health care services, children with Downs syndrome need continuity, and they need to meet professionals who have a caring approach and knowledge and experience of children with Down syndrome.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-62842 (URN)
Conference
The 26th conference of the International Association for Disability and Oral Health (iADH 2022), Paris, France, 23-26 August 2022
Available from: 2023-11-03 Created: 2023-11-03 Last updated: 2023-11-03Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, S., Knutsson, S., Hodges, E. A., Sherwood, G., Broström, A. & Björk, M. (2023). Development of caring behaviour in undergraduate nursing students participating in a caring behaviour course. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of caring behaviour in undergraduate nursing students participating in a caring behaviour course
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In today's complex healthcare organisations there is an increasing recognition of the need to enhance care quality and patient safety. Nurses' competence in demonstrating caring behaviour during patient encounters affects how patients experience and participate in their care. Nurse educators are faced with the challenge of balancing the demand for increasingly complex knowledge and skills with facilitating students' abilities essential to becoming compassionate and caring nurses.

AIM: The aim was to describe undergraduate nursing students' development of caring behaviour while participating in a caring behaviour course.

METHOD: This pilot study used a quantitative observational design. At a university in Sweden, video-recorded observational data from twenty-five students were collected in the first and last weeks of a full-time five-week Caring Behaviour Course (the CBC). In total, 56-min video-recorded simulation interactions between a student and a standardised patient were coded by a credentialed coder using a timed-event sequential continuous coding method based on the Caring Behaviour Coding Scheme (the CBCS). The CBCS maps the five conceptual domains described in Swanson's Theory of Caring with related sub-domains that align with Swanson's qualities of the Compassionate Healer and the Competent Practitioner. The CBCS contains seventeen verbal and eight non-verbal behavioural codes, categorised as caring or non-caring.

RESULTS: Between the two simulations, most verbal caring behaviours increased, and most non-verbal caring behaviours decreased. Statistically significant differences between the simulations occurred in the sub-domains Avoiding assumptions and Performing competently/skilfully in the quality of the Competent Practitioner. Most observed caring behaviours aligned with the Compassionate Healer.

CONCLUSION: Generally, the students' development of caring behaviours increased while participating in the CBC. Using a structured observational behavioural coding scheme can assist educators in assessing caring behaviour both in education and in practice, supporting caring as the universal foundation of nursing and a key to patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Swanson's theory of caring, caring behaviour, nursing education, observational coding scheme, observational method, simulation, standardised patient
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61667 (URN)10.1111/scs.13189 (DOI)001019278500001 ()37350361 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162910262 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;888183 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;888183 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;888183 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-08-14
Odzakovic, E., Huus, K., Ahlberg, B. M., Bradby, H., Hamed, S., Thaper-Björkert, S. & Björk, M. (2023). Discussing racism in healthcare: A qualitative study of reflections by graduate nursing students. Nursing Open, 10(6), 3677-3686
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discussing racism in healthcare: A qualitative study of reflections by graduate nursing students
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2023 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 3677-3686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim is to illustrate and analyse reflections from graduate nursing students over their experience of discussing racism in healthcare in an educational intervention.

Design: A qualitative, descriptive design was adopted.

Methods: Data were collected through written reflections and analysed through content analysis. In total, 81 students participated in the intervention; 39 paediatric and 42 public health care nursing students. Of those, 27 participants gave consent to have their written reflections included in the study.

Results: Three main categories were developed in the content analysis of student reflections: (a) the implicit embeddedness of racism in healthcare organization; (b) the effect of racism on interactions with patients; and (c) a growing awareness of one's own understanding of racism. This study indicates that student nurses discussed racism as relevant to understanding good clinical practice for the benefit of patients and work-based wellbeing of staff. This recognition of the organizational nature of racism warrants nursing leaders and managers to include racism as a social determinant of health in the undergraduate and graduate curricula to educate the next generation of nursing about racism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
article, awareness, child, clinical practice, content analysis, female, graduate nursing student, health care organization, human, leadership, major clinical study, male, manager, nurse, nursing education, public health service, qualitative research, racism, social determinants of health, wellbeing, graduate nursing education, healthcare, knowledge, qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59720 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1619 (DOI)000922006700001 ()36692244 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147115659 (Scopus ID)GOA;;860443 (Local ID)GOA;;860443 (Archive number)GOA;;860443 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016‐04078
Available from: 2023-02-06 Created: 2023-02-06 Last updated: 2023-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ringnér, A., Björk, M. & Olsson, C. (2023). Effects of Person-Centered Information for Parents of Children With Cancer (the PIFBO Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing, 40(6), 400-410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Person-Centered Information for Parents of Children With Cancer (the PIFBO Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial
2023 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing, ISSN 2752-7530, E-ISSN 2752-7549, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 400-410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Conveying information to parents is a core part of pediatric oncology nursing; however, most published interventions do not tailor information to individual parental needs.

Objective: To evaluate the effect on parental illness-related stress of person-centered information provided to parents of children with cancer.

Methods: A multicenter, unblinded randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms recruiting parents of children diagnosed within the past two months from two tertiary children's cancer centers in Sweden. Parents were randomized using sealed envelopes prepared and opened by an independent person. Parents in the intervention arm met four times with experienced nurses trained in the intervention, whereas controls received standard care. The effect of the intervention was measured five times regarding parents’ illness-related stress. Secondary outcomes were psychosocial states, experiences with healthcare providers, and received information. Further, we collected process data on the intervention's content and fidelity.

Results: Of the 32 parents included and analyzed in the study, 16 were randomized to the intervention, which addressed a broad variety of topics. The intervention increased parents’ knowledge about the biophysiological and functional aspects of their child's illness, but it had no measurable effect on their distress.

Discussion: Although fidelity to the intervention protocol was sufficient, the study was flawed by recruitment difficulties, primarily due to organizational factors, which may have prevented us from observing any possible effects on psychosocial distress. Having a person-centered perspective could be promising for future studies aimed at parents of children with cancer. (Registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT02332226.).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
parents, person-centered information, questionnaires, randomized controlled study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59817 (URN)10.1177/27527530221115860 (DOI)000921986100001 ()36731493 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147513006 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;1736711 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;1736711 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;1736711 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR20130086
Available from: 2023-02-14 Created: 2023-02-14 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hansson, H., Björk, M., Santacroce, S. J. & Raunkiaer, M. (2023). End-of-life palliative home care for children with cancer: A qualitative study on parents' experiences. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 37(4), 917-926
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End-of-life palliative home care for children with cancer: A qualitative study on parents' experiences
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 917-926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is insufficient knowledge available about the impact of paediatric palliative care at home on meeting family needs and ensuring the highest quality of care for the dying child. The aim of this study was to elucidate parents' experiences of how and why home-based paediatric palliative care impacted the entire family during their child's final phase of life.

Methods

The study used a qualitative design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the bereaved parents of children who had received palliative care at home from a paediatric cancer hospital department programme that was based on collaboration with community nurses and the paediatric palliative care service. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was applied. The Ecocultural theory was used to explain the findings.

Results

Three main themes emerged: (1) involvement enabling a sense of control and coping, (2) sustaining participation in everyday family life routines and (3) making room for presence and comfort during and after the end-of-life trajectory.

Conclusion

End-of-life palliative care at home can enable parents and other family members to maintain a sense of control, presence and semblance of everyday life. It contributes to managing and alleviating the burden and distress during the last phase of the child's life and during bereavement. We suggest that healthcare professionals support family members in participation and daily life routines and activities during a child's EOL care, as it affects the well-being of the entire family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
adolescent, child, home care services, infant, neoplasms, palliative care, parents, preschool, qualitative research, terminal care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55790 (URN)10.1111/scs.13066 (DOI)000745977900001 ()35072276 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123433651 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;793846 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;793846 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;793846 (OAI)
Funder
Novo Nordisk
Available from: 2022-02-03 Created: 2022-02-03 Last updated: 2023-12-12Bibliographically approved
Stenmarker, M., Björk, M., Golsäter, M. & Enskär, K. (2023). Everyday life during the childhood cancer trajectory—childhood cancer survivors’ descriptions of the role of caring support. Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences, 4, Article ID 1098933.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday life during the childhood cancer trajectory—childhood cancer survivors’ descriptions of the role of caring support
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences, ISSN 2673-6861, Vol. 4, article id 1098933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Being diagnosed with cancer in childhood often has a direct impact on the child’s opportunities to participate in activities and the child’s sense of belonging in different life situations. Experiences of illness in youth affect the lives of these individuals in numerous ways and they need pronounced support to regain their normal life after treatment.

Purpose: To illustrate how childhood cancer survivors describe the role of the caring support provided by healthcare professionals at diagnosis and during the cancer trajectory.

Methods: A mixed methods approach was applied. Swanson’s Theory of Caring was used to deductively analyze the answers in a study-specific questionnaire with Likert scales (1–5). Descriptive and comparative statistics and exploratory factor analyses were performed.

Results: Sixty-two former patients, diagnosed with solid tumors/lymphoma in 1983 to 2003 in Sweden, participated. The mean time passed since treatment was 15.7 years. Swanson’s caring processes Being with and Doing for were the most prominent loading categorical factor indicators. Higher scores for healthcare professionals being emotionally present (Being with), doing for others what they would do for themselves (Doing for) and being willing to understand the sick child’s situation (Knowing) were highlighted by survivors older than 30 years, compared to those younger than 30 years (p=0.041, p=0.045, and p=0.013, respectively). An increased vulnerability regarding their ability to cope with difficulties (Maintain belief) was found among participants who were treated during adolescence, related to schoolchildren (p=0.048), and among those who had been treated with extra-cranial irradiation in comparison with no extra-cranial irradiation (p=0.004). The role of having a partner in comparison with being single was underlined among those who felt they had acquired the tools they needed to take care of themselves (Enabling) (p=0.013). The total explained variance was 63%.

Conclusions: A person-centered care approach during treatment for childhood cancer, reflected by a caring model, highlights the role of healthcare professionals being emotionally present, involving children, performing actions, and with an approach that has potential long-term implications. Childhood cancer patients and survivors need not only clinically competent professionals, but professionals who provide caring interactions with compassion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
childhood cancer survivor, child, adolescents, swanson caring theory, participation, every day life, long term health conditions
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Pediatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-61326 (URN)10.3389/fresc.2023.1098933 (DOI)001019074000001 ()37397267 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174960813 (Scopus ID)GOA;;886497 (Local ID)GOA;;886497 (Archive number)GOA;;886497 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation
Available from: 2023-06-20 Created: 2023-06-20 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Björklund, A.-C., Darcy, L., Santacroce, S. J., Granlund, M. & Björk, M. (2023). Individual patterns of problems with participation, activity, body function and environment in everyday life for children who completed brain tumor treatment. Disability and Rehabilitation, 45(23), 3841-3851
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual patterns of problems with participation, activity, body function and environment in everyday life for children who completed brain tumor treatment
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2023 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 45, no 23, p. 3841-3851Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The study purpose was to, with the help of ICF and the CPS model, describe and explain patterns of co-occurring problems with participation in everyday life activities, body functioning and environment for children who completed brain tumor treatment.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hospital, habilitation and school records for nine children (5-11 yrs.) diagnosed with brain tumor, were retrospectively reviewed for everyday problems after treatment completion. These problems were linked to ICF codes. Median code distribution within ICF constructs participation, body function, body structure, activity, and environment were calculated to generate typical (close to median) and atypical (distant from median) patterns of problems on individual and group levels. Two children were in-depth analyzed with collaborative problem-solving (CPS) model to identify participation problems and plausible explanations.

RESULTS: In total, 4543 ICF linked codes revealed similarities and differences between individuals. The selected child-cases displayed educational challenges and peer-relational problems. The ICF codes related to activity, body function and environment revealed plausible explanations for the children's documented problems with participation in everyday life.

CONCLUSIONS: The combination of ICF and CPS can provide a comprehensive view of the child's problems and guide development of participation in everyday life-focused interventions for children treated for brain tumors.Implications for rehabilitationCare should be guided by interventions and support directed at individual children and their everyday life.The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework can support identification of the individual child's patterns of problems and how these affects the child's everyday life.It is recommended to start by identifying participation problems when using ICF to identify and describe problems in children's natural settings.The collaborative problem-solving model can guide healthcare, habilitation and school services when identifying and acting on typical and atypical problem patterns experienced by these children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Brain tumor, ICF, child, document analysis, everyday life, patterns of problems, treatment completion
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58856 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2022.2140845 (DOI)000879730300001 ()36341684 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141553431 (Scopus ID)HOA;intsam;58856 (Local ID)HOA;intsam;58856 (Archive number)HOA;intsam;58856 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation
Available from: 2022-11-10 Created: 2022-11-10 Last updated: 2023-10-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6419-2417

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