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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Miri, S. F., Javadi, M., Lin, C.-Y., Griffiths, M. D., Björk, M. & Pakpour, A. H. (2019). Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on nutrition improvement and weight of overweight and obese adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Diabetes & Metabolic syndrome: clinical Research & Reviews, 13(3), 2190-2197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on nutrition improvement and weight of overweight and obese adolescents: A randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: Diabetes & Metabolic syndrome: clinical Research & Reviews, ISSN 1871-4021, E-ISSN 1878-0334, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 2190-2197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To assess the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) program on weight reduction among Iranian adolescents who are overweight. Methods: Using a randomized controlled trial design, 55 adolescents who were overweight (mean [SD] age = 14.64 [1.69] years; zBMI = 2.18 [0.65]) were recruited in the CBT program and 55 in the treatment as usual (TAU; mean age = 14.88 [1.50]; zBMI = 2.09 [0.57]) group. All the participants completed several questionnaires (Child Dietary Self-Efficacy Scale; Weight Efficacy Lifestyle questionnaire; Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory; and self-reported physical activity and diet) and had their anthropometrics measured (height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and body fat). Results: The CBT group consumed significantly more fruits and juice, vegetables, and dairy in the 6-month follow-up as compared with the TAU group (p-values <0.001). The CBT group consumed significantly less sweet snacks, salty snacks, sweet drinks, sausages/processed meat, and oils in the six-month follow-up compared with the TAU group (p-values<0.001). Additionally, the waist circumference, BMI, waist-hip ratio, and fat mass were significantly decreased in the CBT group in the six-month follow-up compared with the TAU group (p-values<0.005). The CBT group significantly improved their psychosocial health, physical activity, and health-related quality of life (p-values<0.001). Conclusion: The CBT program showed its effectiveness in reducing weight among Iranian adolescents who were overweight. Healthcare providers may want to adopt this program to treat excess weight problems among adolescents. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Adolescence, CBT, Nutrition, Obesity, Overweight
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-44352 (URN)10.1016/j.dsx.2019.05.010 (DOI)000472598700078 ()31235156 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066156391 (Scopus ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12;HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12;HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)PP HHJ 2019 embargo 12;HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-07-12Bibliographically approved
Enskär, K., Darcy, L., Björk, M., Knutsson, S. & Huus, K. (2019). Experiences of Young Children With Cancer and Their Parents With Nurses' Caring Practices During the Cancer Trajectory. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Article ID 1043454219874007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Young Children With Cancer and Their Parents With Nurses' Caring Practices During the Cancer Trajectory
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, article id 1043454219874007Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Children with cancer require repeated hospitalizations and the family's everyday life and routines undergo change. Concrete descriptions of how nurses act when caring for children with cancer throughout the various phases of care and treatment are sparsely highlighted in the literature. The aim of this study was to describe young children with cancer and their parents' experiences of nurses' caring practices over a 3-year period, from diagnosis to follow-up. This study is based on semistructured interviews with 25 children newly diagnosed with cancer, aged 1 to 6 years, and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. Child and parent data were analyzed with a deductive content analysis using Swanson's theory of caring. The result shows that nurse care practices directed toward young children with cancer and their parents are to some extent similar across a 3-year period from diagnosis to follow-up but also differ in some ways. Nurses' caring practices aim to support children and parents in the transition to a "new normal." Child- and family-friendly care processes include the following: creating hope and a trustful relationship, asking rather than assuming, providing knowledge and information, performing tasks skillfully, displaying an interest in the child's and parents' life outside the hospital, and helping the family to trust in the future and other health care providers. Based on these results, we recommend the development of a standardized and structured nursing care plan or clinical guideline with detailed information on how to carry out clinical nurse care practices in the different phases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Swanson caring theory, cancer, caring, children
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46751 (URN)10.1177/1043454219874007 (DOI)000488438000001 ()31526068 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074264023 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Møller Christensen, B., Björk, M., Almqvist, L. & Huus, K. (2019). Patterns of support to adolescents related to disability, family situation, harassment, and economy. Child Care Health and Development, 45(5), 644-653
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of support to adolescents related to disability, family situation, harassment, and economy
2019 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 644-653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Adolescents need support from family, friends, and teachers to increase their involvement in everyday life. Their environment and their own characteristics also influence their ability to participate in an everyday supportive environment.

AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate patterns of support from parents, teachers, and very important persons such as peers to the ability of adolescents to participate in everyday life, as well as the importance of interpersonal relations as experienced by the adolescents.

METHOD: The study has a cross-sectional design. The data compiled and analysed in this study are part of a longitudinal study of adolescents and their development into adults-LoRDIA (Longitudinal Research on Development In Adolescence). A combination of person- and variable-oriented design was used to capture patterns of support.

RESULTS: Adolescents with a complicated home situation and low economic prerequisites who received little support from parents and friends participated to a lower degree in home activities. A substantial number of these adolescents had self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders and, as a group, were more often exposed to harassment. However, these adolescents participated to a higher extent in school activities, although they received little support from the teachers. The adolescents who received most support from parents and teachers were those with a country of origin other than Sweden and those who lived with both of their parents and had more siblings than average. However, this did not mean that they participated to a higher extent in home and school activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
adolescents, cluster analysis, support
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-44377 (URN)10.1111/cch.12675 (DOI)000481448600004 ()30995346 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065670692 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Lin, C.-Y., Imani, V., Broström, A., Huus, K., Björk, M., Hodges, E. A. & Pakpour, A. H. (2019). Psychological distress and quality of life in Iranian adolescents with overweight/obesity: mediating roles of weight bias internalization and insomnia. Eating and Weight Disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological distress and quality of life in Iranian adolescents with overweight/obesity: mediating roles of weight bias internalization and insomnia
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2019 (English)In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To examine whether weight-related self-stigma (aka weight bias internalization) and insomnia are potential predictors of psychological distress and quality of life (QoL) among Iranian adolescents with overweight (OW)/obesity (OB). To examine whether weight-related self-stigma and insomnia are potential mediators in the relationship between excess weight and health outcomes of distress and QoL.

METHODS: All participants (n = 934; 444 males; mean age = 15.7 ± 1.2 years; zBMI = 2.8 ± 1.0) completed questionnaires on weight-related self-stigma and insomnia at baseline. Six months later, they completed questionnaires on psychological distress and QoL to assess health outcomes. Relationships among variables were tested using mediation analyses with bootstrapping method.

RESULTS: Weight-related self-stigma significantly mediated the effects of zBMI on psychological distress (effect = 0.22; bootstrapping SE = 0.09; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.45), psychosocial QoL (effect = - 0.64; bootstrapping SE = 0.19; 95% CI = - 1.10, - 0.32), and physical QoL (effect = - 1.35; bootstrapping SE = 0.54; 95% CI = - 2.43, - 0.26). Insomnia also significantly mediated the effects of zBMI on psychological distress (effect = 2.18; bootstrapping SE = 0.31; 95% CI = 1.61, 2.81), psychosocial QoL (effect = - 0.89; bootstrapping SE = 0.33; 95% CI = - 1.60, - 0.28), and physical QoL (effect = - 0.83; bootstrapping SE = 0.42; 95% CI = - 1.69, - 0.02). Full mediations were found in psychosocial QoL; partial mediations were found in psychological distress and physical QoL.

CONCLUSIONS: Weight-related self-stigma and insomnia were significant mediators in the effects of excess weight on health outcomes. Therefore, it is important to identify and treat weight-related self-stigma and insomnia for adolescents with OW/OB.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Insomnia, Mental health, Obese, Quality of life, Stigma
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46799 (URN)10.1007/s40519-019-00795-5 (DOI)000493495000001 ()31673986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074688918 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-11 Created: 2019-11-11 Last updated: 2019-11-25
Björklund, A.-C., Granlund, M., Santacroce, S. J., Enskär, K. & Björk, M. (2019). The Documentation of Everyday Functioning in Children with Brain Tumors in Medical Care, Habilitation Services and School - is There a Coherent Description?. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 66(4, SI), S437-S437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Documentation of Everyday Functioning in Children with Brain Tumors in Medical Care, Habilitation Services and School - is There a Coherent Description?
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2019 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 66, no 4, SI, p. S437-S437Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Hematology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46828 (URN)000488458005010 ();HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Enskär, K. & Björk, M. (2019). Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 39, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The young child's experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. This study explores and describes experiences of everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis.

Method

This is a longitudinal, inductive interview study with young children with cancer, and their parents. Interviews from shortly after diagnosis, six and 12 months after diagnosis have been reanalysed. Interviews with the same children and their parents from 18 to 36 months after diagnosis have been analysed for the first time in the present paper. A longitudinal temporal analysis at category level for five synchronic data sets forms the basis for the results.

Results

The child living with cancer over a three year period is described as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. This description is built on three categories: I want to be a child like any other, I need security and control and I feel lonely and left out. Young children with cancer actively strive to understand their illness, participate in care and live an ordinary everyday life- but with ongoing feelings of social isolation and loneliness.

Conclusions

Young children with cancer need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment, is necessary. A child-centred philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Childhood cancer, Everyday life, Young child, Longitudinal
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42409 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2018.12.007 (DOI)000462419500001 ()30850132 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059446147 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-02 Created: 2019-01-02 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Björk, M. & Ringnér, A. (2018). The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 42, E97-E102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 42, p. E97-E102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) measures parental stress related to caring for a child with an illness. However, no Swedish translation is available.

PURPOSE: This study reports a Swedish translation of the PIP and psychometric properties of the instrument.

DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a descriptive/methodological paper. The PIP was translated and culturally adapted to Swedish, and comprehensibility was tested. Data were collected twice from 48 parents of children with different illnesses, and initial psychometric properties of the instrument were examined. The IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) was used for concurrent validity.

RESULTS: The Swedish version of the PIP demonstrated good correlations with the IES-R, and temporal changes were similar. Endorsement frequencies and test-retest were also satisfactory. When comparing groups of parents, the parents of children with cancer were statistically significantly more distressed, both on total score and for emotional distress and role function. Discriminative validity was demonstrated by comparing parents of children with cancer with parents of children with other diseases.

CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the PIP seems to be a valid and reliable instrument. However, as we used relatively small sample, for the future, we suggest further testing with larger samples.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians and researchers seeking to measure parental distress in chronic illness could use the Swedish version of the PIP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Swedish, chronic illness, instrument translation, parental stress, psychometric testing
National Category
Psychology Pediatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41004 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2018.02.013 (DOI)000444524700015 ()29627285 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044938227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Björk, M., Granlund, M. & Enskär, K. (2017). ICF applications in health care for children with cancer in Sweden. In: S. Castro & O. Palikara (Ed.), An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability (pp. 178-186). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICF applications in health care for children with cancer in Sweden
2017 (English)In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 178-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and its version for children and youth, the ICF-CY, can contribute to the present knowledge on the lives of young children with cancer, with an international and interdisciplinary language. In this context, the term health can be seen as a multidimensional concept in which both illness and non-illness/well-being are dimensions that can be present at the same time, rather than two opposite concepts. Health is the result of a continuous process rather than something that one individual has; it is a resource for everyday life rather than the objective of living (WHO, 1986). The ICF was developed to classify different dimensions on individuals’ health as a unified standardised common language and framework, to be used across disciplines (WHO, 2007). It acknowledges that health and illness are complex concepts and promotes a biopsychosocial model of health, in which the context is as important as the individual and his/her needs. The view of health as functioning in everyday life can be operationalised using the ICF model of body structure, body function, activities and participation and environmental factors (Rosenbaum & Gorter, 2012).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
National Category
Educational Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41962 (URN)10.4324/9781315519692 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050297818 (Scopus ID)9781315519685 (ISBN)9781138698178 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Björk, M., Knutsson, S., Granlund, M. & Enskär, K. (2016). Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 33(3), 173-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse.

Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children’s health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory.

Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis.

Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children’s trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

Keywords
Childhood cancer, Sweden, Young child
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26384 (URN)10.1177/1043454215610489 (DOI)000373837100002 ()26655332 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962691659 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Björk, M., Sundler, A. J., Hallström, I. & Hammarlund, K. (2016). Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket – Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 40-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket – Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer.

Method Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach.

Results One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life.

Conclusion There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Death, Lived experience, Nursing, Paediatric cancer, Palliative care, Parents
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32055 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.08.007 (DOI)000389172500006 ()27865251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988644276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-26 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6419-2417

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