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Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Boers, B., Ljungkvist, T. & Brunninge, O. (2023). Ceasing to communicate public family firm identity: the decoupling of internally experienced and externally communicated identities. Journal of Family Business Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ceasing to communicate public family firm identity: the decoupling of internally experienced and externally communicated identities
2023 (English)In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore how the family firm identity is affected when it is no longer publicly communicated. Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach was used to follow a third-generation family business, a large Swedish home electronics firm that acquired a competitor and, initially, continued using its family firm identity after the acquisition. This study longitudinally tracks the company and its owning family using archival data combined with interviews. Findings: The case company decided to stop communicating their identity as a family business. Such a move initially appears counterintuitive, since it potentially threatens the family firm identity and leads the firm to forgo other advantages, e.g. in branding. However, the decision was based on arguments that were rational from a business perspective, leading to a decoupling of family and firm identity. Originality/value: This study contributes to the literature by showing a decoupling of internally experienced and externally communicated identities. It further contributes to the understanding of the family firm identity concept.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Case study, Decoupling, Family business, Family firm identity, Rebranding, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60809 (URN)10.1108/JFBM-01-2023-0003 (DOI)000994457100001 ()2-s2.0-85160336097 (Scopus ID)HOA;;883930 (Local ID)HOA;;883930 (Archive number)HOA;;883930 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-06-07 Created: 2023-06-07 Last updated: 2023-06-07
Brunninge, O. (2023). Invented corporate heritage brands. Journal of Brand Management, 30, 157-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invented corporate heritage brands
2023 (English)In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 30, p. 157-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the phenomenon of invented corporate heritage brands, i.e. heritage that is made up, exaggerated or far-fetched, to an extent that stakeholders may challenge its accuracy. Along six empirical cases, three dimensions characterizing invented heritage are identified, namely facticity, historical connectedness/disconnectedness, and temporal expansion/contraction. Companies draw on three different strategies to build invented corporate heritage brands: The appropriation strategy builds a heritage brand by leveraging the past of organizations that are forerunners of the present firm The forgetting strategy omits or tones down parts of the past that are deemed as not being useful for the brand. Eventually, the fantasizing strategy constructs a brand based on a purely invented past. Overall, the article provides evidence of the high degree of pragmatic flexibility (Burghausen and Balmer in Corporate Communications: an International Journal 19: 384–402, 2014a) inherent in corporate heritage. It also demonstrates how young brands can be infused with heritage, by appropriating the past of historical forerunners that are meaningfully connected to the brand.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Branding, Corporate heritage, Heritage brand, History, Social memory, Temporality
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-59758 (URN)10.1057/s41262-022-00304-7 (DOI)000913881800001 ()2-s2.0-85146619676 (Scopus ID)HOA;;860718 (Local ID)HOA;;860718 (Archive number)HOA;;860718 (OAI)
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Melander, A., Brunninge, O., Andersson, D., Elgh, F. & Löfving, M. (2023). Management innovation in SMEs – taking psychological ownership of Hoshin Kanri. Production planning & control (Print)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management innovation in SMEs – taking psychological ownership of Hoshin Kanri
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2023 (English)In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Management innovations are an important source of competitive advantage, but we lack knowledge on the implementation process, not least in small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs). Recognising that psychological ownership (PO) represents a crucial aspect of the implementation process, we address micro-foundational characteristics of the implementation process. PO and critical incident theory (CIT) provide a lens enabling this micro analysis. The empirical setting is the implementation of Hoshin Kanri, a strategic management system in eight small companies. From the analysis of the eight cases, we operationalise four dimensions that characterise how PO evolves in the implementation process: types of PO incidents, frequency of PO incidents, incidents indicating an increase or decrease in PO, and incidents addressing individual or collective PO. Looking at how PO is developed both among CEOs and managers in SMEs, we use the four dimensions to characterise the evolvement of PO within the focal organisations. In doing so, our article elaborates on PO as a driver and, if insufficiently developed, an impediment to effectively implementing management innovations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60419 (URN)10.1080/09537287.2023.2214517 (DOI)000993411200001 ()2-s2.0-85159953199 (Scopus ID)HOA;;881069 (Local ID)HOA;;881069 (Archive number)HOA;;881069 (OAI)
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2023-05-23 Created: 2023-05-23 Last updated: 2023-09-13
Mugwaneza, O. & Brunninge, O. (2020). Business networks and small and medium enterprise growth in Rwanda. In: Gouranga G. Das & Rukundo Bosco Johnson (Ed.), Rwandan Economy at the crossroads of development: Key Macroeconomic and Microeconomic Perspectives (pp. 115-137). Singapore: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business networks and small and medium enterprise growth in Rwanda
2020 (English)In: Rwandan Economy at the crossroads of development: Key Macroeconomic and Microeconomic Perspectives / [ed] Gouranga G. Das & Rukundo Bosco Johnson, Singapore: Springer, 2020, p. 115-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Networking has been found to be an important source of SME’s growth and development, both in developed and developing countries. This study discusses the importance of networking in the context of Rwanda’s SMEs. Literature on firm growth and business networks discusses networks that the SMEs are involved in, and how these networks help them grow. This study which is set in the context of a developing country follows a case study approach in studying SMEs. Using a cross-case analysis, its findings show that networks remain important and contribute toward the growth of SMEs because they help them address most of their identified growth challenges. However, networks can address some but not all growth challenges and they can address these challenges differently for different SMEs. One case in this study brought together players that would not have been able to meet without the networks. Hence, the study suggests that complementary solutions need to be found for addressing all growth challenges faced by SMEs holistically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Springer, 2020
Series
Frontiers in African Business Research, ISSN 2367-1033
Keywords
networks, business network, growth, small and medium enterprises
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50776 (URN)10.1007/978-981-15-5046-1_7 (DOI)978-981-15-5045-4 (ISBN)978-981-15-5046-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2020-10-06 Last updated: 2020-10-13Bibliographically approved
Brunninge, O., Plate, M. & Ramírez-Pasillas, M. (2020). Family business social responsibility: Is CSR different in family firms?. In: C. E. J. Härtel, W. J. Zerbe & N. M. Ashkanasy (Ed.), Emotions and service in the digital age: (pp. 217-244). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family business social responsibility: Is CSR different in family firms?
2020 (English)In: Emotions and service in the digital age / [ed] C. E. J. Härtel, W. J. Zerbe & N. M. Ashkanasy, Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2020, p. 217-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This chapter explores the m1eaning and significance of family business social responsibilities (FBSRs) using a metasystem approach, placing emphasis on the role of the family.

Design/Methodology/Approach – We employ a revelatory case study to investigate the complexity of family business (corporate) social responsibility. The main case, a German shoe retailer, is supplemented by other case illustrations that provide additional insights into FBSR.

Findings – To fully understand social responsibility in a family firm context, we need to include social initiatives that go beyond the actual family business as a unit. This FBSR connects family members outside and inside the business and across generations. As FBSR is formed through individual and familylevel values, its character is idiosyncratic and contrasts the often standardized approaches in widely held firms.

Practical Implication – Family businesses need to go beyond the business as such when considering their engagement in social responsibility. Family ownership implies that all social initiatives conducted by family members, regardless if they are involved in the firm or not, are connected. This includes a shared responsibility for what family members do at present and have done in the past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2020
Series
Research on Emotion in Organizations, ISSN 1746-9791 ; 16
Keywords
Family business; family firm; corporate social responsibility; family business social responsibility; ownership; generation; succession
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50824 (URN)10.1108/S1746-979120200000016017 (DOI)978-1-83909-260-2 (ISBN)978-1-83909-259-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-10-12 Created: 2020-10-12 Last updated: 2020-10-12Bibliographically approved
Mugwaneza, O. & Brunninge, O. (2019). Business networks and SME growth in Rwanda. In: : . Paper presented at 4th International Conference of Eastern Africa Business and Economic Watch, 12-14 June, 2019, Kigali, Rwanda.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business networks and SME growth in Rwanda
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50778 (URN)
Conference
4th International Conference of Eastern Africa Business and Economic Watch, 12-14 June, 2019, Kigali, Rwanda
Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2020-10-06 Last updated: 2020-10-07
Brunninge, O. & Hartmann, B. J. (2019). Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present. Marketing Theory, 19(2), 229-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present
2019 (English)In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this commentary, we focus on invented corporate heritage, where organizations present falsified accounts of a corporate past. The extant corporate heritage literature has highlighted how the time frames of the past, present and future (omni temporality) are merged in those organizations where there is trait constancy. Focusing on invented corporate heritage, we argue that this represents an extreme case of these dialectics, where present and future precede “the past”, or more appropriately “invented past”. Although lacking in authenticity, an invented corporate heritage may still be attractive to consumers since it can construct an aura of authenticity by delivering an enchanting experience to consumers, irrespective of its substantive genuineness. However, such inventions carry considerable risk since they represent a fabrication of the past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
corporate heritage, social memory, authenticity, temporality, corporate identity, organizational identity, myth
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40652 (URN)10.1177/1470593118790625 (DOI)000469360300007 ()2-s2.0-85052536405 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Mitiku Ferede, M. & Brunninge, O. (2019). Multi-stakeholder collaboration and sustainable entrepreneurship in the Ethiopian tourism industry. In: : . Paper presented at 6th Responsible Management Education Research Conference, 30 September - 3 October, 2019, Jönköping, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-stakeholder collaboration and sustainable entrepreneurship in the Ethiopian tourism industry
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As an activity, entrepreneurship has been praised for its ability to create jobs in both developed and developing countries. Besides, nowadays the concern for environmental and others social issues are becoming equally competing with the employment creation issues. It has been argued that in a world of finite resources, the ‘business case’ for sustainability is not enough, businesses also need to consider the ‘social case’ which takes the social inequality and environmental degradation in to account. Parrish argues that this would help the sustainable entrepreneurship to slow down the rate of harm. This concern highlights on the importance of sustainable entrepreneurship. Sustainable entrepreneurship focuses on solving societal and environmental problems through realizing successful business. In such a process, a variety of stakeholder interests needs to be taken into account, without threatening the viability of the business. However sustainable entrepreneurship goes beyond sacrificing economic gain for being more sustainable. In fact, concern for sustainability helps creating entrepreneurial opportunities that businesses can use strategically to create competitive advantage over industry peers. As the realization of opportunities is at the heart of entrepreneurial activities (Shane & Venkataraman 2000), entrepreneurs can leverage sustainability in a way that addresses social and environmental needs while at the same time contributing to financial success. In the present paper we are going to investigate businesses in the Ethiopian tourism industry to find out how they integrate sustainability in the realization of entrepreneurial opportunities. Conducting qualitative case study on multiple ventures, we are going to answer the following research questions:

1) What attitude do entrepreneurs in the Ethiopian tourism industry have towards sustainability?

2) How do they engage in multi-stakeholder collaborations to make their ventures more sustainable?

3) How do they realize entrepreneurial opportunities connected to sustainability?

Today, there are so far very few empirical based studies on sustainable entrepreneurship, particularly in the case of developing countries. Ethiopia is an interesting context for our study for several reasons. It is ranked as a Least Developed Country by the UN, while at the same time being a popular tourism destination with attractions ranging from national parks to world famous cultural heritage sites. The growing tourism industry creates entrepreneurial opportunities and provides the country with a prospect of economic growth. At the same time, it is critical that tourism grows in a sustainable manner, avoiding social and environmental harm. In this context, collaborating with stakeholders such as employees, local communities and the government is critical for success.Empirically, this paper is based on a qualitative multiple case study of ventures in the Ethiopian tourism industry. We have conducted interviews with owners, manager and employees of the businesses as well as with stakeholders with whom they collaborate. In addition, we have analysed material from company websites and various types of written documentation. We find that the concern businesses show for sustainability varies a lot across cases. While some see sustainability mainly as a task for external stakeholders, others are very knowledgeable of the impact their own activities have on society and the environment. We show how this latter group of companies collaborates with different stakeholder groups to make their businesses more sustainable and to gain a competitive edge over other companies in their industry.

Keywords
sustainability, tourism, Ethiopia, SDG, hospitality industry
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50777 (URN)
Conference
6th Responsible Management Education Research Conference, 30 September - 3 October, 2019, Jönköping, Sweden
Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2020-10-06 Last updated: 2020-10-07
Wielsma, A. & Brunninge, O. (2019). “Who am I? Who are we?”: Understanding the impact of family business identity on the development of individual and family identity in business families. The Journal of Family Business Strategy, 10(1), 38-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Who am I? Who are we?”: Understanding the impact of family business identity on the development of individual and family identity in business families
2019 (English)In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family firms incorporate two identities, namely the identity of the firm and the identity of the family. Previous literature assumes that the owning family influences the identity of the firm by transferring the values and beliefs of the owners to the firm. However, identity theory suggests that identity formation is a dynamic process, based on iterations with the environment and interpretations of the past identity. In family firms this means that identity of the family can also be influenced by the firm. In this longitudinal study of a multi-generational family firm, we draw from identity literature to explore how the interplay between the business and the family identity can take place in a family firm. Our observations suggest that the identity of the firm can influence identity processes on various levels and that this is not necessarily beneficial for the family. Our study thus contributes to the understanding of identity issues in family firms. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Business family, Case study, Family firms, Identity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43338 (URN)10.1016/j.jfbs.2019.01.006 (DOI)000469307100006 ()2-s2.0-85062084651 (Scopus ID);intsam;1296007 (Local ID);intsam;1296007 (Archive number);intsam;1296007 (OAI)
Note

Special Issue: "From Family Identity to Family Firm Image and Reputation: Exploring Facets of the Perception of Family Influence in Branding, Marketing, and Other Messaging"

Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Anisimova, T. & Brunninge, O. (2018). Creating competitive brand advantage via connecting and disconnecting historical epochs through heritage brands. In: 2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2018 Global Marketing Conference, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 2018 (pp. 1258-1260).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating competitive brand advantage via connecting and disconnecting historical epochs through heritage brands
2018 (English)In: 2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo Proceedings, 2018, p. 1258-1260Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
corporate heritage, corporate branding
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42450 (URN)10.15444/GMC2018.10.06.04 (DOI)
Conference
2018 Global Marketing Conference, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7962-6211

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