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Brunninge, O. & Hartmann, B. J. (2019). Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present. Marketing Theory, 19(2), 229-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present
2019 (English)In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this commentary, we focus on invented corporate heritage, where organizations present falsified accounts of a corporate past. The extant corporate heritage literature has highlighted how the time frames of the past, present and future (omni temporality) are merged in those organizations where there is trait constancy. Focusing on invented corporate heritage, we argue that this represents an extreme case of these dialectics, where present and future precede “the past”, or more appropriately “invented past”. Although lacking in authenticity, an invented corporate heritage may still be attractive to consumers since it can construct an aura of authenticity by delivering an enchanting experience to consumers, irrespective of its substantive genuineness. However, such inventions carry considerable risk since they represent a fabrication of the past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
corporate heritage, social memory, authenticity, temporality, corporate identity, organizational identity, myth
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40652 (URN)10.1177/1470593118790625 (DOI)000469360300007 ()2-s2.0-85052536405 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Wielsma, A. & Brunninge, O. (2019). “Who am I? Who are we?”: Understanding the impact of family business identity on the development of individual and family identity in business families. The Journal of Family Business Strategy, 10(1), 38-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Who am I? Who are we?”: Understanding the impact of family business identity on the development of individual and family identity in business families
2019 (English)In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family firms incorporate two identities, namely the identity of the firm and the identity of the family. Previous literature assumes that the owning family influences the identity of the firm by transferring the values and beliefs of the owners to the firm. However, identity theory suggests that identity formation is a dynamic process, based on iterations with the environment and interpretations of the past identity. In family firms this means that identity of the family can also be influenced by the firm. In this longitudinal study of a multi-generational family firm, we draw from identity literature to explore how the interplay between the business and the family identity can take place in a family firm. Our observations suggest that the identity of the firm can influence identity processes on various levels and that this is not necessarily beneficial for the family. Our study thus contributes to the understanding of identity issues in family firms. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Business family, Case study, Family firms, Identity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43338 (URN)10.1016/j.jfbs.2019.01.006 (DOI)000469307100006 ()2-s2.0-85062084651 (Scopus ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Local ID);IHHCeFEOIS (Archive number);IHHCeFEOIS (OAI)
Note

Special Issue: "From Family Identity to Family Firm Image and Reputation: Exploring Facets of the Perception of Family Influence in Branding, Marketing, and Other Messaging"

Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Anisimova, T. & Brunninge, O. (2018). Creating competitive brand advantage via connecting and disconnecting historical epochs through heritage brands. In: 2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2018 Global Marketing Conference, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 2018 (pp. 1258-1260).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating competitive brand advantage via connecting and disconnecting historical epochs through heritage brands
2018 (English)In: 2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo Proceedings, 2018, p. 1258-1260Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
corporate heritage, corporate branding
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42450 (URN)10.15444/GMC2018.10.06.04 (DOI)
Conference
2018 Global Marketing Conference, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Boers, B., Ljungkvist, T. & Brunninge, O. (2018). Dropping family heritage while staying a family business. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International Symposium on Corporate Heritage, Paris, France, 18-20 April 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dropping family heritage while staying a family business
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to explore the consequences for family businesses and the owning families, when the owners decide to give up the family connection in the name of the business. In family firms, the owner family is often very openly and visibly connected to the firm. This close interconnectedness of family and business is often seen as source for both strength and weaknesses of family businesses (Brunninge, 2017; Tagiuri & Davis, 1996).

Moreover, recent research has identified the past as a source for value (Balmer, 2011; Urde, Greyser & Balmer, 2007). Even family firms can draw on their history, developing their heritage (Blombäck & Brunninge, 2013). Connecting family heritage to the heritage of the firm involves opportunities from a branding perspective, but it also includes risk as the family and its members are exposed to more attention from external audiences (Brunninge, 2017).

Therefore, an interesting question arises, concerning what happens when a business gives up branding itself as a family business. How is identity affected, when the family brand is replaced by a brand not alluding to family ownership? To what extent does this imply that the ties with the firm’s and the family’s heritage are cut?

Design/Methodology/Approach: This study follows a case study approach. The focal company is a third generation family business, started in 1951. The company acquired another firm in 2011. In 2016, the owners decided to give up the traditional family brand and only use the brand of the acquired firm for their operations. The case study draws on interviews with representatives of both companies as well as archival study of both.

Findings: The data collection for the study is still in progress. We expect the findings to show to what extent elements of family heritage and corporate heritage survive the decision to give up the family name in a family business and how members of the owning family

Practical implications: Family businesses stand for the majority of companies in the industrialized world. Connecting family heritage and corporate heritage implies opportunities as well as risks. The paper sheds light on issues that family business owners need to be aware of when deciding about connecting or disconnecting the heritage of the family and that of the firm.

Originality/value: Family business research with connections to marketing, branding or more specifically corporate heritage topics is still scarce. Our paper contributes to family business research by showing how connections of corporate and family heritage can be managed and what dropping the family connection in the name implies for the opportunities to leverage corporate and/or family heritage.

Keywords
family business, corporate heritage, corporate branding
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42453 (URN)
Conference
6th International Symposium on Corporate Heritage, Paris, France, 18-20 April 2016
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Boers, B., Ljungkvist, T. & Brunninge, O. (2018). Giving up the family name while staying a family business: The family business as acquirer. In: : . Paper presented at 14th EIASM workshop on family firm management research, Larnaca, Cyprus, May 17-19, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Giving up the family name while staying a family business: The family business as acquirer
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
family business, socioemotional wealth, M&A
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42451 (URN)
Conference
14th EIASM workshop on family firm management research, Larnaca, Cyprus, May 17-19, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Brunninge, O. (2017). Börsen bra. Hemma bäst: MSAB köps ut från börsen. Att familjebolag avnoteras har sina förklaringar.. Affärsvärlden (47), pp. 28-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Börsen bra. Hemma bäst: MSAB köps ut från börsen. Att familjebolag avnoteras har sina förklaringar.
2017 (Swedish)In: Affärsvärlden, ISSN 0345-3766, no 47, p. 4p. 28-31Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

The main owners of the Swedish famly firm Melker Schörling AB (MSAB) have made an offer to the minority owners to repurchase their shares. The intention is to delist MSAB from the stock exchange. It is not uncommon that owning families choose to delist their firms from the stock exchange. One reaseon to do so is that being listed may have negative implications for the socioemotional wealth (SEW) of the owners. Family owners need to consider both financial wealth and socioemotional wealth in their corporate governance decisions. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alma Talent Media AB, 2017. p. 4
Keywords
family business, ownership, corporate governance, buy-out, going private, stock exchange, delisting, MSAB Melker Schörling AB, socioemotional wealth, SEW, familjeföretag, ägande, bolagsstyrning, utköp, börs, avnotering, MSAB, Melker Schörling AB, socioemotionellt välstånd
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37983 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-25 Created: 2017-11-25 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Brunninge, O. (2017). Family heritage in corporate heritage branding: opportunities and risks. In: Foundations of Corporate Heritage: . Oxford: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family heritage in corporate heritage branding: opportunities and risks
2017 (English)In: Foundations of Corporate Heritage, Oxford: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter explores the opportunities and risks associated with addressing family heritage in the context of corporate heritage branding. Family businesses are particularly interesting for the communication of corporate heritage , as the heritage of the company and that of the owner family are usually closely connected. Firms communicating their corporate heritage often aim at assuring stakeholders that central traits of the company will endure even in the future. Such trait constancy can become embodied, reinforced, and extended by the inclusion fo family heritage. However family heritage can become a liability when stakeholders discover negative traits in the family's past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
marketing, branding, family business, renewal, continuity, corporate heritage, social memory
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34179 (URN)9781138833555 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2016-12-05
Boers, B., Ljungkvist, T., Brunninge, O. & Nordqvist, M. (2017). Going private: A socioemotional wealth perspective on why family controlled companies decide to leave the stock-exchange. Paper presented at European-Academy-of-Management Conference, Atlanta, GA, AUG 04-08, 2017. The Journal of Family Business Strategy, 8(2), 74-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Going private: A socioemotional wealth perspective on why family controlled companies decide to leave the stock-exchange
2017 (English)In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our purpose is to understand the process of ‘going private’ decisions in family firms by applying a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective, specified in the following research questions: how do socioemotional wealth considerations influence owning families’ decisions to delist their publicly-listed companies? How do socioemotional wealth considerations change after the delisting of a firm? Based on case studies of two family firms, we elaborate upon the balancing of socioemotional and financial wealth considerations by the family owners, the assessment of which changes over time. Ultimately, we propose that the experiences from being listed can lead to the reevaluation of financial, as well as socioemotional, wealth considerations. By delisting, the companies reclaim independence and control, and the identity as a private family-owned firm becomes once again pronounced. We develop the SEW-perspective by viewing the decision to delist as a mixed gamble, in that owning families have to weigh personal and financial losses against SEW gains, thereby indicating how SEW-considerations change over time. We find that owning families are willing to sacrifice current SEW, accepting current financial losses for prospective increased SEW. Additionally, in this study we extend the argument that decisions to leave the stock market are tradeoffs between competing factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Socioemotional wealth, Family business, Mixed gamble, Going private, Family ownership, Case study
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Humanities and Social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35402 (URN)10.1016/j.jfbs.2017.01.005 (DOI)000417670900002 ()2-s2.0-85017464265 (Scopus ID)
Conference
European-Academy-of-Management Conference, Atlanta, GA, AUG 04-08, 2017
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Achtenhagen, L., Brunninge, O. & Melin, L. (2017). Patterns of dynamic growth in medium-sized companies: beyond the dichotomy of organic versus acquired growth. Long range planning, 50(4), 457-471
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of dynamic growth in medium-sized companies: beyond the dichotomy of organic versus acquired growth
2017 (English)In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 457-471Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current research commonly investigates two different growth modes, organic growth and growth by acquisitions. Studies on acquisition-based growth typically draw on cross-sectional quantitative studies of large firms that treat all acquisitions the same. Our study takes a different approach, and explores different growth modes of a smaller sample of medium-sized companies drawing on a longitudinal, qualitative case-study design. This research design allows us to identify eight different growth modes that companies combine in unique ways over time. Thereby, we illustrate that patterns of dynamic growth in medium-sized firms are much more diverse and complex than commonly assumed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
growth, renewal, SME, medium-sized company, strategy, family business, Penrose, organic growth, M&A, growth mode, organic growth
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31709 (URN)10.1016/j.lrp.2016.08.003 (DOI)000405062500003 ()2-s2.0-84995478960 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2017-09-13Bibliographically approved
Brunninge, O. & Fridriksson, H.-V. (2017). ”We have always been responsible”: A social memory approach to responsibility in supply chains. European Business Review, 29(3), 372-383
Open this publication in new window or tab >>”We have always been responsible”: A social memory approach to responsibility in supply chains
2017 (English)In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 372-383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Drawing on the social memory literature, we discuss what implications referencing to the past can have for how firms manage their supply chains and communicate about them.

Design/Methodology/Approach: In a conceptual manner, we connect the field of responsible supply chain management to the growing literature on corporate heritage and social memory in organizations.

Findings: We develop seven propositions related to the communication of the past and its connection to responsible supply chain management.

Research limitations/implications: A social memory perspective can inform supply chain management research, by helping to better understand how and with what consequences the past can be used in communication about supply chains. Our paper is conceptual in nature and empirical investigations would be needed to support and/or modify our literature-based findings.

Practical implications: Managers should be aware that both opportunities and risks are associated withcommunicating the past in connection to responsible supply chain management. Deployed in the right way, such communication can be valuable both in marketing and in internal management processes.

Originality/value: This article introduces the social memory perspective to the supply chain management field and shows what implications it can have for research on responsibility in supply chains. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
supply chain management, sustainable supp ly chain management, corporate social responsibilit y, social memory, corporate heritage, corporate commun ications
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34562 (URN)10.1108/EBR-02-2016-0033 (DOI)000404765700007 ()2-s2.0-85020551693 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2017-09-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7962-6211

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