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Karltun, J., Karltun, A., Havemose, K. & Kjellström, S. (2019). Positioning the study of first line managers’ resilient action strategies. In: 8th REA Symposium on Resilience Engineering: Scaling up and Speeding up: Proceedings. Paper presented at 8th REA Symposium on Resilience Engineering: Scaling up and Speeding up, Kalmar, Sweden, June 24-27, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positioning the study of first line managers’ resilient action strategies
2019 (English)In: 8th REA Symposium on Resilience Engineering: Scaling up and Speeding up: Proceedings, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper introduces a study on the action strategies of first line managers (FLMs) using a resilience perspective and the aim is to position the study in the theoretical field of resilience management and engineering. One important key to an organization's long-term competitiveness are the first line managers’ ability to handle the role as a leader in daily work. In the role of a FLM, there are a lot of conflicting objectives to manage, for example, regarding available resources, subordinates’ views versus superiors’, centralized and/or local control, optimization of cost and capability (quality and delivery). Moreover, at the operational level of detail, FLMs have to balance daily deliveries in relation to development activities, i.e. technical development, product development, implementation of new system and management concepts. Regardless of the complexity in work and organisational change over time, a FLM’s most important task is to contribute to a high and stable production output out of an input that is characterized by variability and disturbances. To do so in a sustainable way, the FLMs must develop action strategies about ways of working and problem solving that systematically facilitate coping with the situation and managing their own workload. We consider this as developing resilient actions strategies that allow the FLMs to handle the upcoming problems without getting problems on their own. In this paper we describe and develop the theoretical underpinnings of the study as well as how we position our own research in relation to the different theoretical strands of resilience management. We further suggest some methodological ideas on how to capture the work and nature of first line managers’ resilient action strategies. The focus in our work will thus be on how FLMs handle and can improve the more or less chaotic mix of activities in daily work in a resilient way.

Keywords
First line managers, resilience, manufacturing industry
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45850 (URN)978-91-88898-95-1 (ISBN)
Conference
8th REA Symposium on Resilience Engineering: Scaling up and Speeding up, Kalmar, Sweden, June 24-27, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Karltun, A. & Karltun, J. (2018). Benefits of the Human-Technology-Organization Concept in Teaching Ergonomics – Students Perspective. In: Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita (Ed.), Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing: . Paper presented at 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018; Florence; Italy; 26 - 30 August 2018 (pp. 627-636). Springer, 821
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefits of the Human-Technology-Organization Concept in Teaching Ergonomics – Students Perspective
2018 (English)In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Springer, 2018, Vol. 821, p. 627-636Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The human-technology-organization (HTO) concept has been used for creating systems understanding of ergonomics in three engineering educations at the School of Engineering in Jönköping. Students from courses given in two undergraduate and one graduate program (n = 122) participated in the study, which involved a course evaluation questionnaire to assess the understanding of ergonomics as discipline and HTO as a means for creating systems understanding. The questionnaire included both ranking and personal comments to the questions. The results show that the students in general considered knowledge of ergonomics and HTO as beneficial for their future work and that the HTO concept did contribute to their understanding of workplace ergonomics. However, there was a significant difference between undergraduate and graduate students in all these aspects where undergraduates ranked all these aspects lower than graduates. This was also reflected in personal comments on the questions. Conclusions that can be drawn are that understanding systems is generally difficult and the HTO concept can assist in helping students to overcome these difficulties. However, the differences between the student groups must be explicitly considered as well as increasing students’ awareness of the relevance of ergonomics for engineers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Engineering education, HTO concept, Systems understanding, Ergonomics, Surveys, Teaching, Course evaluations, Graduate program, Graduate students, School of engineering, Student groups, Students
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41501 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96080-7_75 (DOI)2-s2.0-85051741239 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96079-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-96080-7 (ISBN)
Conference
20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018; Florence; Italy; 26 - 30 August 2018
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. E., Karltun, J., Keller, C. & Andersson Gäre, B. (2018). Collaborative and partnership research for improvement of health and social services: researcher’s experiences from 20 projects. Health Research Policy and Systems, 16, Article ID 46.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative and partnership research for improvement of health and social services: researcher’s experiences from 20 projects
2018 (English)In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 16, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Getting research into policy and practice in healthcare is a recognised, world-wide concern. As an attempt to bridge the gap between research and practice, research funders are requesting more interdisciplinary and collaborative research, while actual experiences of such processes have been less studied. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge on the interdisciplinary, collaborative and partnership research process by investigating researchers’ experiences of and approaches to the process, based on their participation in an inventive national research programme. The programme aimed to boost collaborative and partnership research and build learning structures, while improving ways to lead, manage and develop practices in Swedish health and social services.

Methods

Interviews conducted with project leaders and/or lead researchers and documentation from 20 projects were analysed using directed and conventional content analysis.

Results

Collaborative approaches were achieved by design, e.g. action research, or by involving practitioners from several levels of the healthcare system in various parts of the research process. The use of dual roles as researcher/clinician or practitioner/PhD student or the use of education designed especially for practitioners or ‘student researchers’ were other approaches. The collaborative process constituted the area for the main lessons learned as well as the main problems. Difficulties concerned handling complexity and conflicts between different expectations and demands in the practitioner’s and researcher’s contexts, and dealing with human resource issues and group interactions when forming collaborative and interdisciplinary research teams. The handling of such challenges required time, resources, knowledge, interactive learning and skilled project management.

Conclusions

Collaborative approaches are important in the study of complex phenomena. Results from this study show that allocated time, arenas for interactions and skills in project management and communication are needed during research collaboration to ensure support and build trust and understanding with involved practitioners at several levels in the healthcare system. For researchers, dealing with this complexity takes time and energy from the scientific process. For practitioners, this puts demands on understanding a research process and how it fits with on-going organisational agendas and activities and allocating time. Some of the identified factors may be overlooked by funders and involved stakeholders when designing, performing and evaluating interdisciplinary, collaborative and partnership research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Collaborative research, co-production, integrated knowledge translation, partnership research, quality improvement, healthcare, social services
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39675 (URN)10.1186/s12961-018-0322-0 (DOI)000433968800001 ()29843735 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047814253 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Karltun, A., Karltun, J., Berglund, M. & Eklund, J. (2017). HTO – A complementary ergonomics approach. Applied Ergonomics, 59, Part A, 182-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HTO – A complementary ergonomics approach
2017 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 59, Part A, p. 182-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The field of human factors and ergonomics constitutes a strong potential in systems analysis, design and improvement. However, it is difficult to communicate its potential value. This paper addresses how the human-technology-organization (HTO) concept can be defined and supports the understanding, communication and development of the systems' character and potential of human factors and ergonomics. Empirical examples from the authors’ experiences of working with the HTO concept in R&D and teaching are illustrated, including its usefulness as: 1) a conceptual model; 2) an analysis framework; 3) a meta methodology; 4) a pedagogical tool; and 5) a design tool. The use of HTO provides guidance on how the system can be designed to better support health, individual and systems performance. It is further suggested that there is a strong potential for developing the theory, applications and methodological aspects of HTO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Human-technology-organization, Systems approach, Interaction, Activity
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31904 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.08.024 (DOI)000390642000020 ()27890126 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995804142 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
Karltun, A., Karltun, J. & Rydell, M. (2017). New legislation on organizational and social work environment: A case study. In: Conference Proceedings: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Organizing for High Performance, July 31-August 3, 2017, Banff, Alberta, Canada. Paper presented at 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists & 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, July 31-August 3, 2017, Banff, Alberta, Canada (pp. 109-114). Association of Canadian Ergonomists
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New legislation on organizational and social work environment: A case study
2017 (English)In: Conference Proceedings: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Organizing for High Performance, July 31-August 3, 2017, Banff, Alberta, Canada, Association of Canadian Ergonomists , 2017, p. 109-114Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 2017
Keywords
road and construction industry, unhealthy workload, working hours, victimization, leadership
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38889 (URN)
Conference
48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists & 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, July 31-August 3, 2017, Banff, Alberta, Canada
Available from: 2018-02-21 Created: 2018-02-21 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Karltun, J., Vogel, K., Bergstrand, M. & Eklund, J. (2016). Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability. Applied Ergonomics, 56, 92-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability
2016 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 56, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knife sharpness is imperative in meat cutting. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of knife blade steel quality with meat cutters' individual ability to maintain the cutting edge sharp in an industrial production setting. Twelve meat cutters in two different companies using three different knives during normal production were studied in this quasi-experimental study. Methods included were measuring knife cutting force before and after knife use, time knives were used, ratings of sharpness and discomfort and interviews. Results showed that the meat cutters' skill of maintaining sharpness during work had a much larger effect on knife sharpness during work than the knife steel differences. The ability was also related to feelings of discomfort and to physical exertion. It was found that meat cutters using more knives were more likely to suffer from discomfort in the upper limbs, which is a risk for developing MSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Individual skill, MSD, Sharpness analyser, Steel quality, Cutting, Ergonomics, Cutting edges, Cutting forces, Individual skills, Industrial production, Knife sharpness, Meat cutters, Meats, adult, analytical parameters, Article, correlational study, devices, human, industry, knife, knife use, meat cutting, musculoskeletal disease, physical parameters, sharpness, skill, time knives were used
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31903 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.03.010 (DOI)000377316400012 ()27184316 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962373597 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Hägg, G. M., Vogel, K., Karltun, J. & McGorry, R. (2015). How do different temperatures affect knife force?. Ergonomics Open Journal (8), 27-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do different temperatures affect knife force?
2015 (English)In: Ergonomics Open Journal, ISSN 1875-9343, E-ISSN 1875-9343, no 8, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Meat cutters have long since claimed that knife forces increase with lower meat temperatures. This study was performed to find out what effects the meat temperature has on cutting forces. In addition, the same issue was addressed for pure fat. One hundred and forty four samples of lean meat and of fat respectively were collected and put overnight inone of three refrigerators with temperatures 2, 7 and 12°C, 48 in each. These samples were cut while measuring cutting forces in an Anago KST Sharpness Analyzer machine. The results show that there were no significant differences in knife forces concerning lean meat at the three temperatures. However, the force in pure fat at 2°C was significantly increased by 30% compared to the other temperatures. The forces in fat were generally three times higher than for lean meat, regardlessof temperature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham Open, 2015
Keywords
deboner, fat, meat cutting work, MSD, pork, repetitive work, temperature.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Food Engineering
Research subject
Technology and Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26820 (URN)10.2174/1875934301508010027 (DOI)JTHIndustriellIS (Local ID)JTHIndustriellIS (Archive number)JTHIndustriellIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-28 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Vogel, K., Karltun, J., Yeow, P. & Eklund, J. (2015). Increased work pace is unprofitable: A beef-cutting case study. Meat Science (105), 81-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased work pace is unprofitable: A beef-cutting case study
2015 (English)In: Meat Science, ISSN 0309-1740, E-ISSN 1873-4138, no 105, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The beef industry worldwide is showing a trend towards increased cutting pace aimed at higher profits. However, prior research in the duck meat industry suggested that a higher cutting pace reduced quality and yield, leading to losses. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by investigating the effects of varying beefcutting paces on yield, quality and economy. A field experiment was conducted on six workers cutting beef fillet, sirloin and entrecôte. Three types of paces were sequentially tested: Baseline (i.e., status quo), ‘Quantity focus’ (i.e., pace required to maximise quantity) and ‘Quality focus’ (i.e., pace required to minimise errors). The results showed a significant drop in yield, increased rate of quality deficiency and economic losses with the change to‘Quantity focus’ (from Baseline and ‘Quality focus’) for all meat types. Workers supported these results andalso added health problems to the list. The results confirmed that an increased cutting pace is unprofitable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
quality, productivity, economy, health, satisfaction, beef
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Technology and Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26821 (URN)10.1016/j.meatsci.2015.03.009 (DOI)000354152600013 ()2-s2.0-84925808961 (Scopus ID)JTHIndustriellIS (Local ID)JTHIndustriellIS (Archive number)JTHIndustriellIS (OAI)
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Karltun, A., Karltun, J., Berglund, M. & Eklund, J. (2014). HTO - a complementary ergonomics perspective. In: O. Broberg, N. Fallentin, P. Hasle, P.L. Jensen, A. Kabel, M.E. Larsen, T. Weller (Ed.), Proceedings of Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management – xi Nordic Ergonomics Society Annual Conference – 46, Copenhagen, August 17-20: . Paper presented at HUMAN FACTORS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT – XI NORDIC ERGONOMICS SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE – 46. Nordic Ergonomics Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HTO - a complementary ergonomics perspective
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management – xi Nordic Ergonomics Society Annual Conference – 46, Copenhagen, August 17-20 / [ed] O. Broberg, N. Fallentin, P. Hasle, P.L. Jensen, A. Kabel, M.E. Larsen, T. Weller, Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2014
Keywords
Systems perspective, Interaction, Human factors, Activity
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25668 (URN)
Conference
HUMAN FACTORS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT – XI NORDIC ERGONOMICS SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE – 46
Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Eklund, J., Karltun, J. & Vogel, K. (2014). Hälsa, produktivitet och kvalitet vid arbete med kniv – en interventionsstudie, dnr 120158: Slutrapport till AFA Försäkring. Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hälsa, produktivitet och kvalitet vid arbete med kniv – en interventionsstudie, dnr 120158: Slutrapport till AFA Försäkring
2014 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Projektet startades enligt plan med insamling och sammanställning av internationella studier och annat underlag. Ett utbildningsmaterial och en metodik för denna har tagits fram i projektet, i samarbete med tre samarbetsföretag inom styckningsbranschen. Tester av utbildningen har genomförts med mycket goda resultat och mycket stort intresse från de deltagande företagen och deras styckare, dvs KLS-Ugglarps, Dalsjöfors Kött i Göteborg samt Scan i Linköping. Vid Scan blev intresset så stort att de under våren 2013 önskade utöka sitt deltagande i tid och med fler styckare än planerat, något som projektet givit dem möjlighet till. Utbildningsmaterial som inkluderar filmer, presentationsmaterial och interventionsmetodiksamt affischer har tagits fram. Resultaten visar att metodiken fungerar och att styckarna genom den återkoppling de får från knivskärpemätutrustningen kan erhålla och bibehålla högre skärpa hos sin kniv. Ett av huvudresultaten från projektet är att polering (trissning) kan återställa knivskärpan och till och med förbättra denistället för slipning samt stålning. Detta innebär att skärkrafterna för styckarna med polering kan minska i storleksordningen 20 %, något som medför minskad belastningsskaderisk, och dessutom minskat knivslitage och knivförbrukning. Detta finns inte beskrivet i forskning eller i praktiska råd för styckare, vare sig i Sverige eller internationellt. Polering ger möjlighet för styckarna att själva i närheten av sin arbetsplats underhålla sin knivskärpa bättre. Vidare uppger företagen att deras kostnader för knivar har minskat påtagligt. Projektet har också identifierat ett antal olika förutsättningar som gör utbildningen mer effektiv. Ett utbildningsmaterial har tagits fram och sprids nu kostnadsfritt via flera aktiviteter och via internet samt hemsidor. Erfarenheter från projektet kommer också att publiceras i en doktorsavhandling som planeras att presenteras under 2015.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. p. 12
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25703 (URN)
Projects
Hälsa, produktivitet och kvalitet vid arbete med kniv - en interventionsstudie
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120158
Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2018-10-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0109-5246

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