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Publications (10 of 93) Show all publications
Winroth, M. & Säfsten, K. (2018). Research Results Improve Learning and Understanding in Master Courses - The use of a manufacturing strategy tool. In: Procedia Manufacturing: . Paper presented at 8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018, Waterfront Convention Centre Stockholm, Sweden, 16 - 18 May 2018 (pp. 47-54). Elsevier, 25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research Results Improve Learning and Understanding in Master Courses - The use of a manufacturing strategy tool
2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 47-54Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The analytical STRATEGO-tool has been used in total 48 project groups in master courses at Chalmers University of Technology from spring term of 2015. The project trains the students in applying theoretical tools at real organizations with a specific interest in analyzing their use of operations strategy. This paper presents the outcome from these courses and specifically discusses its usability as a pedagogic tool in different contexts, even though the intention with the tool initially was to constitute a tool for SMEs who wanted to develop their manufacturing strategies. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Analytical framework, Operations Strategy, Teaching
National Category
Learning Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-44408 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.056 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065670174 (Scopus ID)
Conference
8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018, Waterfront Convention Centre Stockholm, Sweden, 16 - 18 May 2018
Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-07-16Bibliographically approved
Landscheidt, S., Kans, M. & Winroth, M. (2017). Differences on automation practices in wooden single-family houses manufacturing: Four case studies. In: Marcin Zbiec and Kazimierz Orlowski (Ed.), 23rd International Wood Machining Seminar Proceedings: . Paper presented at 23rd International Wood Machining Seminar 2017, Warsaw, 28-31 May, 2017.. Warsaw: The Polish Chamber of Commerce of Furniture Manufacturers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences on automation practices in wooden single-family houses manufacturing: Four case studies
2017 (English)In: 23rd International Wood Machining Seminar Proceedings / [ed] Marcin Zbiec and Kazimierz Orlowski, Warsaw: The Polish Chamber of Commerce of Furniture Manufacturers , 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In densely forested countries, forest and wood based products are generally an important contributing factor to the country’s economy. Especially wood product industries, such as furniture or joinery industries, add a lot of economic value. A large portion of employment positions are linked directly or indirectly to forest and wood product industries. In Europe´s highly industrialized countries, labor costs influence wood product companies rather negatively and put high pressure on them to stay competitive. Some of those companies have chosen outsourcing of their operations and production as means to survive. Another way, already successfully proven in other industries, is the automation of production processes by among others introduction of industrial robots. Effective implementation of automation equipment depends on several factors, e.g. production volume, applied material, chosen application or cycle times. It is not fully clear which factors are mostly affecting the successful change to a more automated production.

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish which automation enabling factors are dependent or independent on the specific conditions of the wood product industry. [SL1] 

By applying a comparative case study approach, automation standards and practices for wood product industries in three highly industrialized European countries are compared and analyzed. As key contribution of this paper crucial factors for the implementation of industrial robots are identified. The contributing factors are set into context to the country’s specific preconditions for wood products, e.g. market penetration, sales volume, availability and supply of resources.

As results of this study, differences and similarities are found for revealing independent or depending factors. Dependent factors are influencing only wood product industries while independent factors are connected to the nation´s specific economic and industrial situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Warsaw: The Polish Chamber of Commerce of Furniture Manufacturers, 2017
Keywords
Automation, industrial robot, international practices, wood product industry
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36873 (URN)9788394804602 (ISBN)
Conference
23rd International Wood Machining Seminar 2017, Warsaw, 28-31 May, 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
Winroth, M. & Bennett, D. (2017). International Production Networks in the Automotive Industry: Drivers and Enablers. In: Proceedings of 24th International Conference on Production Research: . Paper presented at 24th International Conference on Production Research, Poznan, July 28-August 3, 2017.. International Conference on Production Research (ICPR)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Production Networks in the Automotive Industry: Drivers and Enablers
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of 24th International Conference on Production Research, International Conference on Production Research (ICPR) , 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The automotive industry was one of the earliest to internationalise, with overseas production by US companies already happening in the early 1900s. However, the arrangement for overseas automotive production at that time was quite different from the idea of international production networks in the contemporary sense. There were few linkages between international locations and overseas operations were designed either as largely self-sufficient, vertically integrated, replications of their domestic factories or as CKD/SKD assembly plants with little local technical content. By comparison, our current understanding of international production networks is that they are dispersed, collaborative, high value adding and centrally coordinated. This paper uses global company case analysis to identify the drivers and enablers that shape the international production networks of two automotive companies, BMW and Volvo Cars. The methodology contrasts with previous network studies of the automotive industry that have concentrated their analysis at the country and regional level.      

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Conference on Production Research (ICPR), 2017
Keywords
International production networks, automotive industry, case studies, drivers, enablers
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36871 (URN)
Conference
24th International Conference on Production Research, Poznan, July 28-August 3, 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Landscheidt, S., Kans, M. & Winroth, M. (2017). Opportunities for robotic automation in wood product industries: The supplier and system integrators' perspective. In: Procedia Manufacturing: . Paper presented at International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2017, Modena, June 27-30, 2017. (pp. 233-240). Elsevier, 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities for robotic automation in wood product industries: The supplier and system integrators' perspective
2017 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 11, p. 233-240Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study the opportunities for automation in the poorly automated wood product industry are highlighted. This is accomplished by conducting a qualitative interview study of suppliers and system integrators for industrial robots active in this particular industry sector. Five case companies are chosen in order to explore the unique dimensions responsible for successful automation implantation in wood product companies. Results show that a low understanding of automation opportunities, unclear requirements specifications and small production volumes are the main problems for suitable automation solutions. Although wood is a fragile and changeable material, existing technology allows its manipulation with industrial robots. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Series
Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789 ; 11
Keywords
Automation, industrial robot, supplier perspective, system integration; wood product industry
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36869 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2017.07.231 (DOI)000419072100026 ()2-s2.0-85029864755 (Scopus ID)
Conference
International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2017, Modena, June 27-30, 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Landström, A., Almström, P. & Winroth, M. (2017). Review of a performance measurement system at shopfloor level. In: Proceedings of 24th EurOMA Conference: . Paper presented at 24th EurOMA Conference, Edinburgh, July 1-5, 2017.. International Annual EurOMA Conference
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review of a performance measurement system at shopfloor level
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of 24th EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Performance measurement systems (PMS) are used within most manufacturing

companies in Sweden today. However, little focus has been on reviewing the efficiency

of the PMS. This article reviews the PMS in a production unit in a systematic analysis

with a scientific approach. The analysis is based on interview data from the identified

stakeholders of the PMS at the production unit. The studied production unit has a quite

efficient PMS, but there are also some improvement areas the can help them become more

efficient. The systematic analysis method used in the studied case can be used in other

contexts as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017
Keywords
Performance measurement system, Performance indicator, Case study
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36872 (URN)
Conference
24th EurOMA Conference, Edinburgh, July 1-5, 2017.
Projects
SureBPMS
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Zackrisson, M., Kurdve, M., Shabazi, S., Wiktorsson, M., Winroth, M., Landström, A., . . . Myrelid, A. (2017). Sustainability performance indicators at shop floor level in large manufacturing companies. Paper presented at The 24th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, Kamakura, March 8-10, 2017.. Procedia CIRP, 61, 457-462
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability performance indicators at shop floor level in large manufacturing companies
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2017 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, p. 457-462Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates sustainability in the performance measurement systems of Swedish manufacturing companies. It builds on a previous study that documents relatively few direct environmental indicators at shop floor level, which raises questions about possible indirect links between existing indicators and the environment that could be used to improve the environmental aspect of company´s sustainability ambitions. 

A method for identifying and categorizing indirect links to sustainability issues was defined and used. The results suggest that at shop floor level 90% of the indicators have at least an indirect relation to one or more of the sustainability dimensions economy, environment and social, of which 26% are at least indirectly related to the environmental dimension. Despite the many indirect connections, participating companies perceive a need to improve sustainability indicators and some ideas are suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Performance Measurement System, Sustainability, Sustainability Performance Indicator, Environmental management
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-36870 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.11.199 (DOI)000404511900079 ()2-s2.0-85020043898 (Scopus ID)
Conference
The 24th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, Kamakura, March 8-10, 2017.
Projects
SureBPMS
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
Persson, M., Eklind, J. & Winroth, M. (2016). Coordinating external manufacturing of product modules. Decision Sciences, 47(6), 1178-1202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coordinating external manufacturing of product modules
2016 (English)In: Decision Sciences, ISSN 0011-7315, E-ISSN 1540-5915, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1178-1202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Product modularization has changed gradually from mainly being a way to bring strategic flexibility into product design, to becoming a means to reach new suppliers in a globalized world. Use of external suppliers is facilitated by the ‘embedded coordination’ brought by standardized module interfaces which reduce the interdependence between modules manufactured by different suppliers. However, the distance between design and manufacturing is increased by heavy reliance on suppliers, and requires coordination between design and manufacturing. Hence, this paper aims to identify appropriate mechanisms to enable coordination of external manufacturing of product modules.

The investigation is based on two case studies in one manufacturing company that has for long relied heavily on external suppliers. The case studies identify different means, coordination mechanisms, of handling the increased distance between design and manufacturing. In addition to organizational solutions, various intermediaries including especially the supply chain function act as bridges between design and manufacturing. 

The appropriate mechanism to use is decided by the character of the product and the degree of upgrading. We recommend openness to adaptation to situation dynamics rather than investment in optimizing the level of integration with a particular supplier.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Product modules, coordination, external manufacturing
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-27781 (URN)10.1111/deci.12197 (DOI)000392725900008 ()2-s2.0-84952684963 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sustainable Production Initiative
Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Popovic, D. & Winroth, M. (2016). Industrial timber house building – levels of automation. In: ISARC 2016: . Paper presented at 33rd International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction, Auburn, United States, 18 July 2016 through 21 July 2016 (pp. 470-477). International Association for Automation and Robotics in Construction (IAARC)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial timber house building – levels of automation
2016 (English)In: ISARC 2016, International Association for Automation and Robotics in Construction (IAARC) , 2016, p. 470-477Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Swedish industrial timber house building faces a constantly increasing housing demand. In order to respond to the demand, companies in this sector, have to improve their businesses in terms of productivity. At the same time, they need to meet customer requirements, i.e., offering flexible building solutions, thus creating a balance between productivity and flexibility. Off-site assembly of exterior walls is an essential part of the house production, and cutting down lead times at this phase hence, increases the competitiveness. If introduced in a right way, automation can contribute to a higher productivity. Thus, right levels of both physical and cognitive automation are necessary. The objective of this study is to measure the current levels of automation (LoA) within the off-site exterior wall assembly. Research design consisted of a literature study and a case study that was conducted at a Swedish company that is an engineer-to-order producer of single-family timber houses. A case study design was made according to the DYNAMO ++ framework. The framework was used in the assessment of LoA and designing flexible task allocation in many manufacturing industries, but there is a lack of knowledge on how to use this method in the industrial timber house building. The average physical and cognitive LoA of 124 identified tasks are 3 and 1 respectively. Increased physical and cognitive LoA for critical tasks would enable flexible task allocation between human operators and technology. It is believed that this type of flexibility can result in less production disturbances and higher productivity when a high variety of exterior walls is assembled.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Association for Automation and Robotics in Construction (IAARC), 2016
Keywords
physical and cognitive levels of automation, hierarchical task analysis, exterior wall, single-family timber house, off-site assembly
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-32238 (URN)10.22260/ISARC2016/0057 (DOI)2-s2.0-84994252447 (Scopus ID)
Conference
33rd International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction, Auburn, United States, 18 July 2016 through 21 July 2016
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2016-11-04 Created: 2016-11-04 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Salim, R., Andersson, O., Schneider, C., Winroth, M. & Säfsten, K. (2016). Levels of Automation in the wood products industry: A case study. In: Proceedings of the 23rd EurOMA Conference: . Paper presented at 23rd EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, 17th-22nd June, 2016.. International Annual EurOMA Conference
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of Automation in the wood products industry: A case study
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 23rd EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper investigates the effect of the changeover in levels of automation (LoA) on the material utilization and the production flexibility in processing line systems, in the wood product industry. Further, the paper examines the applicability of the DYNAMO methodology in the chosen context. A case study was conducted where two processing line systems were analysed and compared in terms of LoA and performance. The results imply that consistency in quality and the ability to handle product complexity are affected by the changeover in LoA. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016
Keywords
Levels of Automation (LoA), material utilization, production flexibility
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31437 (URN)978-82-303-3277-1 (ISBN)
Conference
23rd EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, 17th-22nd June, 2016.
Projects
ProWood
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2016-08-23 Created: 2016-08-23 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Löfving, M., Säfsten, K. & Winroth, M. (2016). Manufacturing strategy formulation, leadership style and organisational culture in small and medium-sized enterprises. International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management (IJMTM), 30(5), 306-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manufacturing strategy formulation, leadership style and organisational culture in small and medium-sized enterprises
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management (IJMTM), ISSN 1368-2148, E-ISSN 1741-5195, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 306-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study encourages an increased focus on managerial and organisational issues in manufacturing strategy formulation. The study investigates the relationship between manufacturing strategy formulation, leadership style and organisational culture in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Manufacturing strategy formulation is studied in three cases, and it is found that the formulation is different in each case. Leadership style is more visible than organisational culture in manufacturing strategy formulation in the case companies. Owing to the small number of employees in SMEs, the top manager’s decisions influence the whole organisation and the organisational culture. The leadership style and organisational culture are closely aligned in SMEs owing to the managers and to the centralised decision-making.

Keywords
Manufacturing strategy, process, formulation, leadership style, organisational culture, small and medium-sized enterprises, SMEs, small firms
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31390 (URN)10.1504/IJMTM.2016.078918 (DOI)2-s2.0-84986189955 (Scopus ID)
Projects
STRATEGO
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2016-08-19 Created: 2016-08-19 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3236-5648

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