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Golsäter, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2019). Parents’ perceptions of how nurses care for children as relatives of an ill patient: Experiences from an oncological outpatient department. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 39, 35-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ perceptions of how nurses care for children as relatives of an ill patient: Experiences from an oncological outpatient department
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

Research has shown that a child's knowledge about what is happening to a parent when he/she has a cancer disease is crucial to the child's health and wellbeing. Therefore the purpose of this study was to explore parents’ perceptions of how nurses in clinical practice care for children as relatives when one parent in the family has a cancer disease.

Method:

A qualitative explorative design with interviews was used. Altogether 28 parents (17 patients and 11 partners) were interviewed. The transcripts from the interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results:

The parents perceive that the nurses make efforts to support the child as well as them as parents, but feel that the care needs to be more tailored to the specific child and his/her situation. The children are initially invited, generally informed and seen by the nurses, but the parents perceive that they themselves need repeated support and advice over time to uphold their parental responsibility for caring for their children during the illness trajectory.

Conclusion:

The parents argue for the importance of receiving repeated advice and support for how to talk to their children about the disease and treatment. The parents describe how the nurses were helpful by asking after the children and explaining the value of their visiting the hospital.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2019
Keywords
Children as relatives, Co-production, Nursing, Parents, Qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43114 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2019.01.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060543265 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Enskär, K. & Björk, M. (2019). Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 39, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The young child's experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. This study explores and describes experiences of everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis.

Method

This is a longitudinal, inductive interview study with young children with cancer, and their parents. Interviews from shortly after diagnosis, six and 12 months after diagnosis have been reanalysed. Interviews with the same children and their parents from 18 to 36 months after diagnosis have been analysed for the first time in the present paper. A longitudinal temporal analysis at category level for five synchronic data sets forms the basis for the results.

Results

The child living with cancer over a three year period is described as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. This description is built on three categories: I want to be a child like any other, I need security and control and I feel lonely and left out. Young children with cancer actively strive to understand their illness, participate in care and live an ordinary everyday life- but with ongoing feelings of social isolation and loneliness.

Conclusions

Young children with cancer need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment, is necessary. A child-centred philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Childhood cancer, Everyday life, Young child, Longitudinal
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42409 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2018.12.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059446147 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-02 Created: 2019-01-02 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Herngren, B., Stenmarker, M., Enskär, K. & Hägglund, G. (2018). Outcomes after slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a population-based study with three-year follow-up.. Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, 12(5), 434-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcomes after slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a population-based study with three-year follow-up.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, ISSN 1863-2521, E-ISSN 1863-2548, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 434-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate outcomes three years after treatment for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE): development of a vascular necrosis (AVN), subsequent surgery, hip function and the contralateral hip.

Methods: This prospective cohort study included a total national population of 379 children treated for SCFE between 2007 and 2013. A total of 449 hips treated for SCFE and 151 hips treated with a prophylactic fixation were identified. The Barnhöft questionnaire, a valid patient-reported outcome measure (PROM), was used.

Results: In all, 90 hips had a severe slip, 61 of these were clinically unstable. AVN developed in 25 of the 449 hips. Six of 15 hips treated with capital realignment developed AVN. A peri-implant femur fracture occurred in three slipped hips and in two prophylactically pinned hips. In three of these five hips technical difficulties during surgery was identified. In 43 of 201 hips scheduled for regular follow-up a subsequent SCFE developed in the contralateral hip. Implant extraction after physeal closure was performed in 156 of 449 hips treated for SCFE and in 51 of 151 prophylactically fixed hips. Children with impaired hip function could be identified using the Barnhöft questionnaire.

Conclusion: Fixation in situ is justified to remain as the primary treatment of choice in SCFE. Overweight is more common in children with SCFE than in the average population. Prophylactic fixation is a safe procedure when performed using a correct technique. The number of patients who developed AVN after capital realignment is of concern. We recommend rigorous follow-up of both hips, including PROM evaluation, until physeal closure.

Level of Evidence: II - prospective cohort study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery, 2018
Keywords
complications, outcome, patient-reported outcome measures, slipped capital femoral epiphysis
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42353 (URN)10.1302/1863-2548.12.180067 (DOI)000446125800003 ()30294367 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M., Enskär, K., Steineck, G., Wilderäng, U. & Jarfelt, M. (2018). Self-Perceived physical attractiveness in relation to scars among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: A population-based study. Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, 7(3), 358-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Perceived physical attractiveness in relation to scars among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: A population-based study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, ISSN 2156-5333, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 358-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Cancer treatment may result in various effects that last long after treatment has been concluded. The purpose of this study was to explore to what extent scars affect adolescents and young adults postcancer treatment.

METHODS: In this population-based study, a study-specific questionnaire was developed by a method used in several previous investigations carried out by our research group, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology. Question development involved expert validation by professionals from oncology units, midwives, epidemiologists, and statisticians. The questionnaire was developed in collaboration with adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. The topics covered in the questionnaire were as follows: psychosocial health, body image and sexuality, fertility, education, work, and leisure. The web-based questionnaire was sent to teenage and young adult cancer survivors and matched controls in Sweden.

RESULTS: In this study, the relative risk of feeling less attractive due to scars was higher both for female cancer survivors RR 1.48, CI 1.05-2.08 and male cancer survivors RR 1.90, CI 1.15-3.13 compared to controls. The feeling of attractiveness was negatively related to the size of scars in both cancer and control groups. In a logistic regression analysis, significant associations were found between age, education, exercise, depression, and the feeling of low attractiveness due to scars.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide a basis for care interventions for teenage and young adult cancer patients during and after cancer treatment. Further research is needed on care interventions to reduce, if possible, the impact of scars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2018
Keywords
attractiveness, body image, cancer survivors, physical scars, treatment-related sequelae
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38826 (URN)10.1089/jayao.2017.0089 (DOI)000423516000001 ()29373051 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048301422 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-13 Created: 2018-02-13 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M., Steineck, G., Enskär, K., Wilderäng, U. & Jarfelt, M. (2018). Sexual function in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors - a population-based study. Journal of cancer survivorship, 12(4), 450-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual function in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors - a population-based study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of cancer survivorship, ISSN 1932-2259, E-ISSN 1932-2267, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Previous research has established that treatments for cancer can result in short- and long-term effects on sexual function in adult cancer patients. The purpose was to investigate patient-reported physical and psychosexual complications in adolescents and young adults after they have undergone treatment for cancer.

METHODS: In this population-based study, a study-specific questionnaire was developed by a method used in several previous investigations carried out by our research group, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology. The questionnaire was developed in collaboration with adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (15-29 years) and validated by professionals from oncology units, midwives, epidemiologists, and statisticians. The topics covered in the questionnaire were psychosocial health, body image, sexuality, fertility, education, work, and leisure. The web-based questionnaire was sent to adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and matched controls in Sweden.

RESULTS: In this study, adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (15-29 years) showed low satisfaction regarding sexual function compared to controls (P < 0.01). Female adolescent and young adult cancer survivors had a statistically significant lower frequency of orgasm during sexual activity than the controls (P < 0.01). Male adolescent and young adult cancer survivors had statistically significant lower sexual desire than the controls (P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: We found that adolescent and young adult cancer survivors perceived themselves as being less satisfied with their sexual function than matched population-based controls.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors need psychological rehabilitation support from the health care profession during and after cancer treatment to help them to reduce their reported poor sexual function to enhance a good sexual quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents and young adults, Late effects, Sexual function, Survivorship
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39287 (URN)10.1007/s11764-018-0684-x (DOI)000439477500003 ()29508213 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045129889 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Björkman, B., Gimbler Berglund, I., Faresjö, M., Enskär, K. & Huus, K. (2017). Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?. Paper presented at 62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography. Acta Radiologica, 58(1 Suppl.), 16-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?
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2017 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 1 Suppl., p. 16-16Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Anxiety is often experienced by children undergoing health care procedures, and children with autism spectrum disorders (ADS) experience more anxiety than typically developed children. A prerequisite for obtaining an optimum procedure is firstly based on the health care provider’s knowledge about children with ASD, but may also depend on the use of guidelines. Two previous national surveys showed, that none radiology or paediatric departments and a minority of anaesthesiology departments throughout Sweden use specific guidelines when seeing children with ASD. Following, the purpose was to develop guidelines to use when caring for and preparing children with ASD in those settings.

Methods: A modified Delphi method was used, including19 experts identified from the two afore mentioned surveys. The questions considered in the process, proceeded from previous research and the results from the surveys. The experts’ responses regarding the importance of each item, were analysed and scrutinized between each round.

Results: The Delphi process resulted in guidelines consisting of 15 items and a checklist with 16 aspects. The items cover the areas: planning and involving parents, features in the environment, use of time, communication, thehealth care professionals. The checklist covers the child’spattern of communication, anxiety, sensory stimuli, special interests and likes/dislikes.

Conclusions: To obtain an optimum caring encounter when a child with ASD is seen in the preoperative and radiology setting, a meticulous planning is important and the environment should be adjusted for the needs of the child. To accomplish this, guidelines need to be in place and be followed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37303 (URN)000404621700013 ()
Conference
62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Enskär, K., Andersson-Gäre, B. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches. Nordic journal of nursing research, 37(2), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches
2017 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An illness or injury sustained by a family member affects all family members. It is consequently important that a child’s need to be involved in a family member’s care is clearly recognized by healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals’ approaches to children as relatives of a parent being cared for in a clinical setting. A web-based study-specific questionnaire was sent and responded to by 1052 healthcare professionals in Sweden. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis. The results show that guidelines and routines are often lacking regarding involving children in the care of a parent. Compared to other areas, psychiatric units seem to have enacted routines and guidelines to a greater extent than other units. The results indicate that structured approaches based on an awareness of the children’s needs as well as a child-friendly environment are vital in family-focused care. These aspects need to be prioritized by managers in order to support children’s needs and promote health and wellbeing for the whole family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
child; children as relatives; healthcare professionals; ill parent; web questionnaire
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34082 (URN)10.1177/2057158516662538 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
Wu, X. V., Enskär, K., Pua, L. H., Heng, D. G. & Wang, W. (2017). Clinical nurse leaders’ and academics’ perspectives on clinical assessment of final-year nursing students: a qualitative study. Nursing and Health Sciences, 19(3), 287-293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical nurse leaders’ and academics’ perspectives on clinical assessment of final-year nursing students: a qualitative study
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2017 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The nature of nursing practice is diverse; therefore, clinical assessment is a complex process. This study explores the perceptions of clinical nurse leaders and academics on clinical assessment for undergraduate nursing education during transition to practice. An explorative qualitative approach was applied. Eight nurse managers, six clinical nurse educators, and eight academics from two tertiary hospitals and a university in Singapore participated in four focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was conducted. Four overriding themes were revealed: the need for a valid and reliable clinical assessment tool, preceptors' competency in clinical assessment, challenges encountered by the students in clinical assessment, and the need for close academic and clinical collaboration to support preceptors and students. Closer academic-clinical partnership is recommended to review the clinical education curriculum. Clinical and educational institutions need to work closely to design a learning program to enhance preceptors' competence in clinical pedagogy and assessment. Furthermore, a stress management program could build students' resiliency in coping with unfamiliar clinical environments. Ongoing support needs to be provided for both preceptors and students to enrich the preceptorship and learning experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
academics; clinical assessment; clinical nurse leaders; clinical nursing education; nurse preceptors; undergraduate nursing students
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29935 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12342 (DOI)000409188300003 ()28371304 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016968526 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Note

Included in thesis in its submitted form

Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2017). Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness. Nursing Open, 4(4), 267-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness
2017 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Children, content analysis, parental illness, school nurse, school situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37583 (URN)10.1002/nop2.92 (DOI)000418555300009 ()29085652 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2082
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Johansson, L.-O. & Harder, M. (2017). General practitioners’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers: An interview study. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 36(1), 3-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>General practitioners’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers: An interview study
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe general practitioners’ (GPs’) accounts of how to facilitate consultations with children aged 1–2 years.

Design: A qualitative study based on focus group interviews.

Setting and subjects: Five focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 25 GPs at Swedish primary health care (PHC) centres. The GPs regularly invited toddlers to consultations.

Result: The GPs’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers revealed descriptions of making efforts to instil confidence in the situation to enable the consultation. Toddlers in need of health care always visit the GP with adults such as their parents, guardians or other relatives. Therefore, the GP directs efforts towards the adults and the child more or less simultaneously, as they both need to rely on the GP. The GPs describe how they instil confidence in the adults by establishing a mutual understanding that the consultation is necessary to secure the child’s health. Regarding the child, the GP instils confidence by establishing a relationship in order to approach the child and accomplish bodily examinations.

Conclusion: The result shows that GPs’ encounters with children in consultations are two-sided. The GP needs to conduct bodily examinations to secure the child’s health and development, but to do so he/she needs to establish purposeful relationships with the adults and the child by instilling confidence. This indicates that establishing relationships in the consultation is significant, and a way to achieve a child-centred consultation.

KEY POINTS Research regarding GPs’ encounters with toddlers in consultation is limited, even though toddlers frequently visit PHC. GPs make efforts to instil confidence by establishing mutual understanding with parents and a relationship with the child. Establishing purposeful relationships with both the child and parent is significant in enabling the consultation. Establishing a relationship with the child overrides conducting the bodily examination, t opromote the child’s feeling of ease and allow a child-centred consultation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Children, consultation, focus group, general practitioner, qualitative study, general practice, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35151 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2017.1287518 (DOI)000396039600002 ()28277052 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014519793 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2019-02-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8596-6020

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