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Olsson, M., Enskär, K., Steineck, G., Wilderäng, U. & Jarfelt, M. (2018). Self-Perceived physical attractiveness in relation to scars among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: A population-based study. Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, 7(3), 358-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Perceived physical attractiveness in relation to scars among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: A population-based study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, ISSN 2156-5333, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 358-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Cancer treatment may result in various effects that last long after treatment has been concluded. The purpose of this study was to explore to what extent scars affect adolescents and young adults postcancer treatment.

METHODS: In this population-based study, a study-specific questionnaire was developed by a method used in several previous investigations carried out by our research group, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology. Question development involved expert validation by professionals from oncology units, midwives, epidemiologists, and statisticians. The questionnaire was developed in collaboration with adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. The topics covered in the questionnaire were as follows: psychosocial health, body image and sexuality, fertility, education, work, and leisure. The web-based questionnaire was sent to teenage and young adult cancer survivors and matched controls in Sweden.

RESULTS: In this study, the relative risk of feeling less attractive due to scars was higher both for female cancer survivors RR 1.48, CI 1.05-2.08 and male cancer survivors RR 1.90, CI 1.15-3.13 compared to controls. The feeling of attractiveness was negatively related to the size of scars in both cancer and control groups. In a logistic regression analysis, significant associations were found between age, education, exercise, depression, and the feeling of low attractiveness due to scars.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide a basis for care interventions for teenage and young adult cancer patients during and after cancer treatment. Further research is needed on care interventions to reduce, if possible, the impact of scars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2018
Keywords
attractiveness, body image, cancer survivors, physical scars, treatment-related sequelae
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38826 (URN)10.1089/jayao.2017.0089 (DOI)000423516000001 ()29373051 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048301422 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-13 Created: 2018-02-13 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M., Steineck, G., Enskär, K., Wilderäng, U. & Jarfelt, M. (2018). Sexual function in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors - a population-based study. Journal of cancer survivorship, 12(4), 450-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual function in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors - a population-based study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of cancer survivorship, ISSN 1932-2259, E-ISSN 1932-2267, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Previous research has established that treatments for cancer can result in short- and long-term effects on sexual function in adult cancer patients. The purpose was to investigate patient-reported physical and psychosexual complications in adolescents and young adults after they have undergone treatment for cancer.

METHODS: In this population-based study, a study-specific questionnaire was developed by a method used in several previous investigations carried out by our research group, Clinical Cancer Epidemiology. The questionnaire was developed in collaboration with adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (15-29 years) and validated by professionals from oncology units, midwives, epidemiologists, and statisticians. The topics covered in the questionnaire were psychosocial health, body image, sexuality, fertility, education, work, and leisure. The web-based questionnaire was sent to adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and matched controls in Sweden.

RESULTS: In this study, adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (15-29 years) showed low satisfaction regarding sexual function compared to controls (P < 0.01). Female adolescent and young adult cancer survivors had a statistically significant lower frequency of orgasm during sexual activity than the controls (P < 0.01). Male adolescent and young adult cancer survivors had statistically significant lower sexual desire than the controls (P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: We found that adolescent and young adult cancer survivors perceived themselves as being less satisfied with their sexual function than matched population-based controls.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors need psychological rehabilitation support from the health care profession during and after cancer treatment to help them to reduce their reported poor sexual function to enhance a good sexual quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents and young adults, Late effects, Sexual function, Survivorship
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39287 (URN)10.1007/s11764-018-0684-x (DOI)000439477500003 ()29508213 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045129889 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Björkman, B., Gimbler Berglund, I., Faresjö, M., Enskär, K. & Huus, K. (2017). Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?. Paper presented at 62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography. Acta Radiologica, 58(1 Suppl.), 16-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?
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2017 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 1 Suppl., p. 16-16Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Anxiety is often experienced by children undergoing health care procedures, and children with autism spectrum disorders (ADS) experience more anxiety than typically developed children. A prerequisite for obtaining an optimum procedure is firstly based on the health care provider’s knowledge about children with ASD, but may also depend on the use of guidelines. Two previous national surveys showed, that none radiology or paediatric departments and a minority of anaesthesiology departments throughout Sweden use specific guidelines when seeing children with ASD. Following, the purpose was to develop guidelines to use when caring for and preparing children with ASD in those settings.

Methods: A modified Delphi method was used, including19 experts identified from the two afore mentioned surveys. The questions considered in the process, proceeded from previous research and the results from the surveys. The experts’ responses regarding the importance of each item, were analysed and scrutinized between each round.

Results: The Delphi process resulted in guidelines consisting of 15 items and a checklist with 16 aspects. The items cover the areas: planning and involving parents, features in the environment, use of time, communication, thehealth care professionals. The checklist covers the child’spattern of communication, anxiety, sensory stimuli, special interests and likes/dislikes.

Conclusions: To obtain an optimum caring encounter when a child with ASD is seen in the preoperative and radiology setting, a meticulous planning is important and the environment should be adjusted for the needs of the child. To accomplish this, guidelines need to be in place and be followed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37303 (URN)000404621700013 ()
Conference
62nd Nordic Congress of Radiology & 23rd Nordic Congress of Radiography
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Enskär, K., Andersson-Gäre, B. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches. Nordic journal of nursing research, 37(2), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children as relatives to a sick parent: Healthcare professionals’ approaches
2017 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An illness or injury sustained by a family member affects all family members. It is consequently important that a child’s need to be involved in a family member’s care is clearly recognized by healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals’ approaches to children as relatives of a parent being cared for in a clinical setting. A web-based study-specific questionnaire was sent and responded to by 1052 healthcare professionals in Sweden. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis. The results show that guidelines and routines are often lacking regarding involving children in the care of a parent. Compared to other areas, psychiatric units seem to have enacted routines and guidelines to a greater extent than other units. The results indicate that structured approaches based on an awareness of the children’s needs as well as a child-friendly environment are vital in family-focused care. These aspects need to be prioritized by managers in order to support children’s needs and promote health and wellbeing for the whole family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
child; children as relatives; healthcare professionals; ill parent; web questionnaire
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34082 (URN)10.1177/2057158516662538 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
Wu, X. V., Enskär, K., Pua, L. H., Heng, D. G. & Wang, W. (2017). Clinical nurse leaders’ and academics’ perspectives on clinical assessment of final-year nursing students: a qualitative study. Nursing and Health Sciences, 19(3), 287-293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical nurse leaders’ and academics’ perspectives on clinical assessment of final-year nursing students: a qualitative study
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2017 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The nature of nursing practice is diverse; therefore, clinical assessment is a complex process. This study explores the perceptions of clinical nurse leaders and academics on clinical assessment for undergraduate nursing education during transition to practice. An explorative qualitative approach was applied. Eight nurse managers, six clinical nurse educators, and eight academics from two tertiary hospitals and a university in Singapore participated in four focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was conducted. Four overriding themes were revealed: the need for a valid and reliable clinical assessment tool, preceptors' competency in clinical assessment, challenges encountered by the students in clinical assessment, and the need for close academic and clinical collaboration to support preceptors and students. Closer academic-clinical partnership is recommended to review the clinical education curriculum. Clinical and educational institutions need to work closely to design a learning program to enhance preceptors' competence in clinical pedagogy and assessment. Furthermore, a stress management program could build students' resiliency in coping with unfamiliar clinical environments. Ongoing support needs to be provided for both preceptors and students to enrich the preceptorship and learning experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
academics; clinical assessment; clinical nurse leaders; clinical nursing education; nurse preceptors; undergraduate nursing students
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29935 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12342 (DOI)000409188300003 ()28371304 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016968526 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Note

Included in thesis in its submitted form

Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2017). Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness. Nursing Open, 4(4), 267-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness
2017 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Children, content analysis, parental illness, school nurse, school situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37583 (URN)10.1002/nop2.92 (DOI)000418555300009 ()29085652 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2082
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Golsäter, M., Johansson, L.-O. & Harder, M. (2017). General practitioners’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers: An interview study. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 36(1), 3-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>General practitioners’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers: An interview study
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe general practitioners’ (GPs’) accounts of how to facilitate consultations with children aged 1–2 years.

Design: A qualitative study based on focus group interviews.

Setting and subjects: Five focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 25 GPs at Swedish primary health care (PHC) centres. The GPs regularly invited toddlers to consultations.

Result: The GPs’ accounts of how to facilitate consultations with toddlers revealed descriptions of making efforts to instil confidence in the situation to enable the consultation. Toddlers in need of health care always visit the GP with adults such as their parents, guardians or other relatives. Therefore, the GP directs efforts towards the adults and the child more or less simultaneously, as they both need to rely on the GP. The GPs describe how they instil confidence in the adults by establishing a mutual understanding that the consultation is necessary to secure the child’s health. Regarding the child, the GP instils confidence by establishing a relationship in order to approach the child and accomplish bodily examinations.

Conclusion: The result shows that GPs’ encounters with children in consultations are two-sided. The GP needs to conduct bodily examinations to secure the child’s health and development, but to do so he/she needs to establish purposeful relationships with the adults and the child by instilling confidence. This indicates that establishing relationships in the consultation is significant, and a way to achieve a child-centred consultation.

KEY POINTS Research regarding GPs’ encounters with toddlers in consultation is limited, even though toddlers frequently visit PHC. GPs make efforts to instil confidence by establishing mutual understanding with parents and a relationship with the child. Establishing purposeful relationships with both the child and parent is significant in enabling the consultation. Establishing a relationship with the child overrides conducting the bodily examination, t opromote the child’s feeling of ease and allow a child-centred consultation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Children, consultation, focus group, general practitioner, qualitative study, general practice, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35151 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2017.1287518 (DOI)000396039600002 ()28277052 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014519793 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Gimbler Berglund, I., Björkman, B., Enskär, K., Faresjö, M. & Huus, K. (2017). Management of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the anesthesia and radiographic context. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 38(3), 187-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the anesthesia and radiographic context
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: As a primary objective, this study purports to develop guidelines to better care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly regarding these children's preparation for anesthesia and radiologic procedures.

Methods: Using a Delphi method with an online distribution of questionnaire, guidelines for caring for children with ASD were created. Twenty-one participants were included in the expert panel. These participants were working with children with ASD in several anesthesia and radiology departments in Sweden. A list of items was created from a previous survey and the literature. In the first round, the items with <60% agreement were discarded. Items were merged, and a new list was created. Two more similar rounds were performed. In the last 2 rounds, 21 participants responded, and 80% agreement was considered to be consensus.

Results: The final guidelines consisted of 14 items and a checklist of 16 factors. The 5 areas covered by the items and the checklist were as follows: planning involving parents/guardians, features in the environment, and use of time, communication, and the health care professionals. The organization was important in making it possible for the health care professional to care for the individual child according to the child's needs. It was important to involve the parents/guardians to obtain knowledge about the functioning of the child.

Conclusion: A caring encounter involving a child with ASD in the anesthesia and radiology contexts requires advance planning, catered specifically to the individual needs of each child. To accomplish this, general knowledge regarding ASD and ASD's particular manifestation in the child entrusted to their care, is required from the health care workers. The organization needs to have structures in place to facilitate this process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2017
National Category
Nursing Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35267 (URN)10.1097/DBP.0000000000000432 (DOI)000399585500004 ()28333847 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015965039 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-05-12Bibliographically approved
Knutsson, S., Enskär, K. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent at an adult ICU. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 39, 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent at an adult ICU
2017 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 39, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Despite a cultural change in visitation policies for children (0-17 years) in the intensive care unit (ICU) to a more open approach, children are still restricted from visiting for various reasons. To overcome these obstacles, it is vital to determine what is needed while encountering a child.

AIM:

To elucidate nurses' experiences of what constitutes the encounter with children visiting a sick parent in an adult ICU.

METHOD:

An explorative inductive qualitative design was used, entailing focus group interviews with 23 nurses working at a general ICU. The interviews were analysed according to inductive content analysis.

RESULTS:

The findings show components that constitute the encounter with children as relatives at the ICU, as experienced by ICU nurses: nurses need to be engaged and motivated; parents need to be motivated; the child needs individual guidance; and a structured follow-up is needed. This reflects a child-focused encounter.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nurses need to adopt a holistic view, learn to see and care for the child individually, and be able to engage parents in supporting their children. To accomplish this the nurses need engagement and motivation, and must have knowledge about what constitutes a caring encounter, in order to achieve a caring child-focused encounter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Children; Critically ill; Encounter; Family; Intensive care unit; Qualitative study; Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34205 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2016.09.003 (DOI)000396956400002 ()28209429 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012277220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2082
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2017-05-02Bibliographically approved
Harder, M., Enskär, K. & Golsäter, M. (2017). Nurses’ use of pliable and directed strategies when encountering children in child and school healthcare. Journal of Child Health Care, 21(1), 55-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ use of pliable and directed strategies when encountering children in child and school healthcare
2017 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nurses in Swedish child and school healthcare need to balance their assignment of promoting children’s health and development based on the national health-monitoring programme with their responsibility to consider each child’s needs. In this balancing act, they encounter children through directed and pliable strategies to fulfil their professional obligations. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent to which nurses use different strategies when encountering children during their recurrent health visits throughout childhood. A quantitative descriptive content analysis was used to code 30 video recordings displaying nurses’ encounters with children (3–16 years of age). A constructed observation protocol was used to identify the codes. The results show that nurses use pliable strategies (58%) and directed strategies (42%) in encounters with children. The action they use the most within the pliable strategy is encouraging (51%), while in the directed strategy, the action they use most is instructing (56%). That they primarily use these opposing actions can be understood as trying to synthesize their twofold assignment. However, they seem to act pliably to be able to fulfil their public function as dictated by the national health-monitoring programme, rather than to meet each child’s needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35155 (URN)10.1177/1367493516679014 (DOI)000397413600007 ()29156977 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034619053 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8596-6020

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