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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Stadin, M., Maria, N., Broström, A., Magnusson Hanson, L., Westerlund, H. & Fransson, E. (2016). Information and communication technology demands at work and development of suboptimal self-rated health: Prospective findings from the SLOSH study. In: : . Paper presented at Forte Talks 2016, Stockholm, 8-9 mars 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information and communication technology demands at work and development of suboptimal self-rated health: Prospective findings from the SLOSH study
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Keywords
Work-related stress; information and communication technology demans; self-rated health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29612 (URN)
Conference
Forte Talks 2016, Stockholm, 8-9 mars 2016.
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, #2013-1141
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2016-05-11Bibliographically approved
Ulhassan, W., Schwarz, U. v., Westerlund, H., Sandahl, C. & Thor, J. (2015). How visual management for continuous improvement might guide and affect hospital staff: A case study. Quality Management in Health Care, 24(4), 222-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How visual management for continuous improvement might guide and affect hospital staff: A case study
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2015 (English)In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 222-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Visual management (VM) tools such as whiteboards, often employed in Lean thinking applications, are intended to be helpful in improving work processes in different industries including health care. It remains unclear, however, how VM is actually applied in health care Lean interventions and how it might influence the clinical staff. We therefore examined how Lean-inspired VM using whiteboards for continuous improvement efforts related to the hospital staff's work and collaboration. Within a case study design, we combined semistructured interviews, nonparticipant observations, and photography on 2 cardiology wards. The fate of VM differed between the 2 wards; in one, it was well received by the staff and enhanced continuous improvement efforts, whereas in the other ward, it was not perceived to fit in the work flow or to make enough sense in order to be sustained. Visual management may enable the staff and managers to allow communication across time and facilitate teamwork by enabling the inclusion of team members who are not present simultaneously; however, its adoption and value seem contingent on finding a good fit with the local context. A combination of continuous improvement and VM may be helpful in keeping the staff engaged in the change process in the long run.

Keywords
hospital wards, Lean management, organizational case studies, whiteboards
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29578 (URN)10.1097/QMH.0000000000000073 (DOI)000369965300008 ()26426324 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84943384943 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Stadin, M., Maria, N., Broström, A., Magnusson Hanson, L., Westerlund, H. & Fransson, E. (2015). Information and communication technology demands: The association with job strain and effort-reward imbalance in different socioeconimic strata. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference on Advances in Health Care Sciences Research 2015, Stockholm, 11-12 november, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information and communication technology demands: The association with job strain and effort-reward imbalance in different socioeconimic strata
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Keywords
Work-related stress; Information and communication technology demands; self-rated health; Socioeconomic status
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28365 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Conference on Advances in Health Care Sciences Research 2015, Stockholm, 11-12 november, 2015.
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, grant #2013-1141
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2016-05-11Bibliographically approved
Ulhassan, W., Schwarz, U. v., Thor, J. & Westerlund, H. (2014). Interactions between lean management and the psychosocial work environment in a hospital setting - a multi-method study. BMC Health Services Research, 14, 480
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions between lean management and the psychosocial work environment in a hospital setting - a multi-method study
2014 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 14, p. 480-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: As health care struggles to meet increasing demands with limited resources, Lean has become a popular management approach. It has mainly been studied in relation to health care performance. The empirical evidence as to how Lean affects the psychosocial work environment has been contradictory. This study aims to study the interaction between Lean and the psychosocial work environment using a comprehensive model that takes Lean implementation information, as well as Lean theory and the particular context into consideration. Methods: The psychosocial work environment was measured twice with the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) employee survey during Lean implementations on May-June 2010 (T1) (n = 129) and November-December 2011 (T2) (n = 131) at three units (an Emergency Department (ED), Ward-I and Ward-II). Information based on qualitative data analysis of the Lean implementations and context from a previous paper was used to predict expected change patterns in the psychosocial work environment from T1 to T2 and subsequently compared with COPSOQ-data through linear regression analysis. Results: Between T1 and T2, qualitative information showed a well-organized and steady Lean implementation on Ward-I with active employee participation, a partial Lean implementation on Ward-II with employees not seeing a clear need for such an intervention, and deterioration in already implemented Lean activities at ED, due to the declining interest of top management. Quantitative data analysis showed a significant relation between the expected and actual results regarding changes in the psychosocial work environment. Ward-I showed major improvements especially related to job control and social support, ED showed a major decline with some exceptions while Ward-II also showed improvements similar to Ward-I. Conclusions: The results suggest that Lean may have a positive impact on the psychosocial work environment given that it is properly implemented. Also, the psychosocial work environment may even deteriorate if Lean work deteriorates after implementation. Employee managers and researchers should note the importance of employee involvement in the change process. Employee involvement may minimize the intervention's harmful effects on psychosocial work factors. We also found that a multi-method may be suitable for investigating relations between Lean and the psychosocial work environment.

Keywords
COPSOQ, Stress, Employee involvement, Nurses, Sweden
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25900 (URN)10.1186/1472-6963-14-480 (DOI)000344105100001 ()25339236 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84965191650 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-18 Created: 2015-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8806-5698

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